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82 records – page 1 of 9.

40-year trends in skin cancer in British Columbia, Canada, 1973 to 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125127
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
David I McLean
Norm Phillips
Youwen Zhou
Richard Gallagher
Tim K Lee
Author Affiliation
Prevention Programs and Cancer Control Research, BC Cancer Agency, BC. david.mclean@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Skin cancer is common in North America. Incidence rate trends are potentially important in the assessment of the effects of measures to increase sun awareness in the population as well as measures to reduce sun damage.
To determine the incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) in a geographically defined Canadian population over a 40-year period.
Data were obtained from the BC Cancer Registry for the calendar years 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003.
Age-standardized incidence rates increased significantly from 1973 to 2003 for BCC, SCC, and CMM.
The ethnic makeup of British Columbia has changed over time, and a novel method of accounting for the effect of this on skin cancer rates is presented.
The incidence rate for skin cancers continued to rise in British Columbia, but there appears to have been a decline in the incidence of CMM and BCC in the youngest cohorts.
PubMed ID
22513059 View in PubMed
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Actinic Keratosis Diagnosis and Increased Risk of Developing Skin Cancer: A 10-year Cohort Study of 17,651 Patients in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311024
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2020 Apr 29; 100(8):adv00128
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-29-2020
Author
Ghassan Guorgis
Chris D Anderson
Johan Lyth
Magnus Falk
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2020 Apr 29; 100(8):adv00128
Date
Apr-29-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Keratosis, Actinic - diagnosis
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Actinic keratosis is the most common actinic lesion in fair-skinned populations. It is accepted as an indicator of actinic skin damage and as an occasional precursor of squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate, in a cohort of patients with a diagnosis of actinic keratosis, the relative risk of developing skin cancer during a follow-up period of 10 years. This registry-based cohort study compared a cohort of 2,893 individuals in south-eastern Sweden, who were diagnosed with actinic keratosis during the period 2000 to 2004, with a matched-control cohort of 14,668 individuals without actinic keratosis during the same inclusion period. The subjects were followed for 10 years to identify skin cancer development in both cohorts. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used as risk measures. Individuals in the actinic keratosis cohort had a markedly higher risk for all skin cancer forms compared with the control cohort (hazard ratio (HR) 5.1, 95% CI 4.7-5.6). The relative risk was highest for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (HR 7.7, 95% CI 6.7-8.8) and somewhat lower for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (HR 4.4, 95% CI 4.1-5.0) and malignant melanoma (MM) (HR 2.7 (2.1-3.6). Patients with a diagnosis of actinic keratosis were found to be at increased risk of developing SCC, BCC and MM in the 10 years following diagnosis of actinic keratosis. In conclusion, a diagnosis of actinic keratosis, even in the absence of documentation of other features of chronic sun exposure, is a marker of increased risk of skin cancer, which should be addressed with individually directed preventive advice.
PubMed ID
32314794 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the risk of skin cancer from sunlight and solaria in subjects living in northern Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235096
Source
Photodermatol. 1987 Jun;4(3):118-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987
Author
B L Diffey
Author Affiliation
Regional Medical Physics Department, Dryburn Hospital, Durham, UK.
Source
Photodermatol. 1987 Jun;4(3):118-26
Date
Jun-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Child
Germany, West
Great Britain
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Occupations
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
The risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in northern Europeans who indulge in sunbathing or use a UVA solarium was estimated using a mathematical model of skin cancer incidence that makes allowance for childhood, occupational and recreational sun exposure. This model demonstrates that the cumulative incidence of skin cancer in indoor workers is about 2-3% by the age of 70, yet this risk can increase 5-fold if they indulge in a two-week sunbathing vacation each summer. The use of a UVA solarium is also shown to increase the risk of skin cancer. Because risk increases with the approximate square of annual solarium exposure, it is not possible to define a 'safe' level of exposure. Instead, it is shown that weekly use of a UVA solarium from age 20 until middle age (40-50) gives a relative cumulative incidence of 1.3 compared with non-users of sun beds and sun canopies. The risk begins to increase rapidly for more frequent use, particularly when solaria are used in combination with sunbathing.
PubMed ID
3684734 View in PubMed
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Atopic dermatitis and risk of skin cancer: a Danish nationwide cohort study (1977-2006).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128708
Source
Am J Clin Dermatol. 2012 Feb 1;13(1):29-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2012
Author
Annette O Jensen
Claus Svaerke
Dora Körmendiné Farkas
Anne B Olesen
Knud Kragballe
Henrik T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. aoj@dce.au.dk
Source
Am J Clin Dermatol. 2012 Feb 1;13(1):29-36
Date
Feb-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent data suggest a reduced risk of malignant melanoma (MM) among atopic dermatitis (AD) patients, but an increased risk of other skin cancers (including basal cell carcinoma [BCC] and squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]).
We examined the association between AD and skin cancers in a large cohort study in Denmark from 1977 through 2006.
Our cohort consisted of 31 330 AD patients recorded in the Danish National Patient Registry, including AD patients admitted to hospitals and specialized outpatient clinics. Linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry allowed ascertainment of skin cancers. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by comparing the incidence rate of skin cancers among AD patients with that among the general Danish population.
The overall observed number of MM cases among AD patients was 12, with 21 expected, yielding a SIR of 0.59 (95% CI 0.30, 1.02), with the most pronounced protective effect among AD patients with more than 5 years of follow-up (SIR?=?0.46; 95% CI 0.19, 0.95). The corresponding SIRs for BCC and SCC were increased among AD patients (1.41 [95% CI 1.07, 1.83] and 2.48 [95% CI 1.00, 5.11], respectively).
Our findings support an inverse association between AD and MM, but an increased risk of BCC and SCC among AD patients.
PubMed ID
22175302 View in PubMed
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Basal cell carcinoma. An epidemiologic study in a defined population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24414
Source
Cancer. 1992 Jul 1;70(1):104-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1992
Author
E. Dahl
M. Aberg
A. Rausing
E L Rausing
Author Affiliation
Department of Plastic Surgery, Allmänna Sjukhuset, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Cancer. 1992 Jul 1;70(1):104-8
Date
Jul-1-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND. The incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in a defined population is unknown. METHODS. The incidence of histologically diagnosed cases of BCC in a defined population of a city in southern Sweden was studied. Four 2-year periods were examined from 1970 to 1986. Cases from 1970 and 1980 were reexamined microscopically. RESULTS. From 1970 to 1986, the age-standardized incidence of BCC was doubled. BCC was equally common in male and female patients. It was possible to trace another BCC in the medical history of 41% of the patients. The risk of development of BCC increased rapidly with age greater than 55 years. Approximately two-thirds of the tumors were found in the head and neck region. There was a possible increase in superficial multicentric tumors on the trunk but otherwise an essentially unchanged pattern in type and distribution. CONCLUSIONS. The age-standardized incidence of histologically diagnosed BCC was doubled from 1970 to 1986. The rapid increase should be taken into consideration when planning allocation of medical resources.
PubMed ID
1606530 View in PubMed
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Basal Cell Carcinoma is as Common as the Sum of all Other Cancers: Implications for Treatment Capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279452
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2016 May;96(4):505-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Ann-Sofie Holm
Christoffer V Nissen
Hans Christian Wulf
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2016 May;96(4):505-9
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Incidence
Needs Assessment - trends
Prevalence
Registries
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Time Factors
Abstract
Reliable estimates of disease incidence are fundamental to planning future healthcare services. However, in many countries registration of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is often non-existent. This study examines how many BCC treatments were carried out in Denmark in 2013. The Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Pathology Registry were used to examine how many BCC treatments were registered, and a test sample was taken from Bispebjerg Hospital to examine the number treated but not registered. The study showed that 21.7% of BCC treatments were performed solely on a clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, some records are inadequate in relation to BCC registration, as BCCs treated are 3 times the number of individuals in the Danish Cancer Registry, and there are nearly as many BCCs as the sum of all other cancers. The increasing BCC incidence will result in difficulties in ensuring treatment capacity.
PubMed ID
26554445 View in PubMed
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Basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid in Finland during 1953-97.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175502
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2005 Apr;83(2):215-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Ville Paavilainen
Juhani Tuominen
Eero Pukkala
K Matti Saari
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2005 Apr;83(2):215-20
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Eyelid Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Social Class
Abstract
To study the incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the eyelid in Finland.
We studied 6241 cases of BCC of the eyelid reported to the nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry during 1953-97. We determined the age- and sex- specific incidence rates and overall rates adjusted for age to the world standard population, and social class- and occupation-specific standardized incidence ratios, with the total Finnish population as reference.
The incidence rates of BCC of the eyelid varied between 0.7 and 3.0 per 100 000 person-years in men and between 0.5 and 2.8 per 100 000 person-years in women during the study period. The age-adjusted incidence rates of BCC of the eyelid increased during 1953-87 (p
PubMed ID
15799736 View in PubMed
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Basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid. Risk of recurrence according to adequacy of surgical margins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21492
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1998 Aug;76(4):477-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
H. Sigurdsson
B A Agnarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1998 Aug;76(4):477-80
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Eyelid Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To examine all basal cell carcinomas of the eyelid diagnosed in Iceland during a 25-year period, paying special attention to the surgical margins of excision in relation to recurrence. Based on the results a simple, clinically relevant method of classifying the surgical margin is proposed. METHODS: All histologically proven basal cell cancer specimens from eyelids were reviewed retrospectively. The surgical excision margins were classified as radical, marginal or intralesional. RESULTS: Recurrence risk was low when the tumor had a surgical margin described as radical or marginal. The recurrence rate was 38% when the margin was intralesional. CONCLUSION: By assessing the surgical margins by this method, which is easy to apply, better understanding between the pathologist and the surgeon may be achieved.
PubMed ID
9716337 View in PubMed
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Basal-cell carcinoma of the skin: a harbinger of cutaneous and noncutaneous multiple primary cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22405
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1996 Nov 15;125(10):852-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1996
Author
D. Schottenfeld
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1996 Nov 15;125(10):852-4
Date
Nov-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Causality
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Ann Intern Med. 1996 Nov 15;125(10):815-218928988
PubMed ID
8928994 View in PubMed
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Basal cell carcinoma of the vulva: clinical features and treatment results in 28 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207404
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Nov;90(5):765-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
J L Benedet
D M Miller
T G Ehlen
M A Bertrand
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. lbenedet@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1997 Nov;90(5):765-8
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - surgery
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Vulva - surgery
Vulvar Neoplasms - epidemiology - surgery
Abstract
To review our experience and that in the recent literature regarding basal cell carcinoma of the vulva to see whether current management guidelines are appropriate.
Twenty-eight women with basal cell carcinoma of the vulva were seen over 25 years at the BC Cancer Agency. The clinical-pathologic features were tabulated and the outcome was analyzed.
The mean age was 74 years, and almost two-thirds were over the age of 70 at diagnosis. Patients typically presented with an irritation or soreness, with a symptom duration ranging from a few months to several years. Most lesions were confined to the anterior half of the vulva, and 23 of the 28 patients had T1 lesions. Wide local excision was the treatment method used most commonly. Only one patient was known to have died from disease metastasis. Ten women had other basal cell carcinomas, either before or after the diagnosis of their vulvar lesions, and in ten patients 11 other malignancies were diagnosed.
Basal cell carcinoma of the vulva is an extremely uncommon tumor that rarely metastasizes or spreads. Primary treatment should consist of wide local excision and continued follow-up.
PubMed ID
9351761 View in PubMed
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82 records – page 1 of 9.