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Beverage consumption of Canadian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152560
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Didier Garriguet
Author Affiliation
Health Information and Research Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6. didier.garriguet@statcan.gc.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):23-9
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholic Beverages - utilization
Animals
Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Caffeine
Canada
Carbonated Beverages - utilization
Central Nervous System Stimulants
Coffee
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Female
Fruit
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - utilization
Sex Factors
Tea
United States
Water
Young Adult
Abstract
According to results from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition, total beverage consumption among adults declined steadily with age. This reflects drops in the percentage of adults consuming most beverages and in the amounts consumed. While water was the beverage consumed most frequently and in the greatest quantity by adults, for many of them, coffee ranked second. Largely as a result of drinking coffee, more than 20% of men and 15% of women aged 31 to 70 exceeded the recommended maximum of 400 milligrams of caffeine per day. About 20% of men aged 19 to 70 consumed more than two alcoholic drinks a day. Owing to declines in the consumption of soft drinks and alcohol, the contribution of beverages to adults' total calorie intake falls at older ages. Regardless of age, men were generally more likely than women to report drinking most beverages, and those who did, drank more. There were, however, a few exceptions, with higher percentages of women than men reporting that they drank water and tea.
PubMed ID
19226924 View in PubMed
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Beverage consumption of children and teens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152561
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Didier Garriguet
Author Affiliation
Health Information and Research Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6. didier.garriguet@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):17-22
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Carbonated Beverages - utilization
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Fruit
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Male
Milk - utilization
Water
Abstract
According to results from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey--Nutrition, children and teens get about one-fifth of their daily calories from beverages. As they get older, boys and girls drink less milk and fruit juice, and more soft drinks and fruit drinks. By ages 14 to 18, boys' average daily consumption of soft drinks matches their consumption of milk, and exceeds their consumption of fruit juice and fruit drinks. Beverage consumption by children and teens varies little by province, except in Newfoundland and Labrador where it tends to be comparatively high, and in British Columbia where it tends to be low.
PubMed ID
19226923 View in PubMed
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Beverage consumption patterns of Canadian adults aged 19 to 65 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121161
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2175-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Nooshin Nikpartow
Adrienne D Danyliw
Susan J Whiting
Hyun J Lim
Hassanali Vatanparast
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2175-84
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Animals
Beer
Beverages
Canada
Carbonated Beverages
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Drinking
Educational Status
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Milk
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Sweetening Agents
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the beverage intake patterns of Canadian adults and explore characteristics of participants in different beverage clusters.
Analyses of nationally representative data with cross-sectional complex stratified design.
Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2 (2004).
A total of 14 277 participants aged 19-65 years, in whom dietary intake was assessed using a single 24 h recall, were included in the study. After determining total intake and the contribution of beverages to total energy intake among age/sex groups, cluster analysis (K-means method) was used to classify males and females into distinct clusters based on the dominant pattern of beverage intakes. To test differences across clusters, ?2 tests and 95 % confidence intervals of the mean intakes were used.
Six beverage clusters in women and seven beverage clusters in men were identified. 'Sugar-sweetened' beverage clusters - regular soft drinks and fruit drinks - as well as a 'beer' cluster, appeared for both men and women. No 'milk' cluster appeared among women. The mean consumption of the dominant beverage in each cluster was higher among men than women. The 'soft drink' cluster in men had the lowest proportion of the higher levels of education, and in women the highest proportion of inactivity, compared with other beverage clusters.
Patterns of beverage intake in Canadian women indicate high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages particularly fruit drinks, low intake of milk and high intake of beer. These patterns in women have implications for poor bone health, risk of obesity and other morbidities.
PubMed ID
22931911 View in PubMed
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Beverage intake improvement by high school students in Saskatchewan, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153676
Source
Nutr Res. 2008 Mar;28(3):144-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Elisabeth Lo
Renee Coles
M Louise Humbert
Joyce Polowski
Carol J Henry
Susan J Whiting
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5C9.
Source
Nutr Res. 2008 Mar;28(3):144-50
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Attitude to Health
Beverages - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Carbonated Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Child Nutrition Sciences - education
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Certain beverages contribute energy, protein, vitamins, and minerals. North American adolescents have shifted their beverage intake from predominantly milk to predominantly sugary beverages. Intake of these sugary beverages, in sufficient quantity, may increase the risk of bone fractures, may contribute to obesity, and may lead to tooth decay. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a school-nutrition education program (Fluids Used Effectively for Living) on nutrition knowledge, attitude, and self-reported behavior of grade 9 students in Saskatchewan, Canada. Two classes of grade 9 students, 1 (n = 33) in a high school in Saskatoon (n = 33) and 1 (n = 24) in a large high school in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, received the peer educator intervention. Two other classes in the 2 cities (n = 24 and n = 24, respectively) were controls. Six sessions of Fluids Used Effectively for Living nutrition education were delivered by using 2 peer educator models (multiple and single), and the intervention was delivered in a 45-minute weekly class session over a 6-week period. After the intervention, students in these 2 peer educator classes decreased their sugary beverage intake significantly, which was sustained for 3 months. Students in the control self-taught class increased their juice intake at the end of the year. The significant decrease of juice and sugary beverage intakes in the single model peer educator class disappeared after Bonferroni correction. Carbonated sugary beverage intake of students in the control self-taught classes declined, but it was not sustainable at the 3-month follow-up. A peer educator school-based nutrition education approach can lead to a decrease in sugary beverage intake in high school children.
PubMed ID
19083401 View in PubMed
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Caffeine and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter: the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17161
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):578-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Lars Frost
Peter Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Lars.Frost@as.aaa.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):578-82
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - etiology
Atrial Flutter - epidemiology - etiology
Cacao - chemistry
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - analysis
Coffee - chemistry
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea - chemistry
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is not known whether the consumption of caffeine is associated with excess risk of atrial fibrillation. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in association with daily consumption of caffeine from coffee, tea, cola, cocoa, and chocolate. DESIGN: We prospectively examined the association between the amount of caffeine consumed per day and the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter among 47 949 participants (x age: 56 y) in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. Subjects were followed in the Danish National Registry of Patients and in the Danish Civil Registration System. The consumption of caffeine was analyzed by quintiles with Cox proportional-hazard models. RESULTS: During follow-up (x: 5.7 y), atrial fibrillation or flutter developed in 555 subjects (373 men and 182 women). When the lowest quintile of caffeine consumption was used as a reference, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% CIs) in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.12 (0.87, 1.44), 0.85 (0.65, 1.12), 0.92 (0.71, 1.20), and 0.91 (0.70, 1.19), respectively. CONCLUSION: Consumption of caffeine was not associated with risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):539-4015755819
PubMed ID
15755825 View in PubMed
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Carbonated soft drinks and risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma: a population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81082
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Aug 16;98(16):1158-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-2006
Author
Lagergren Jesper
Viklund Pernilla
Jansson Catarina
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. jesper.lagergren@ki.se
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Aug 16;98(16):1158-61
Date
Aug-16-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects - utilization
Cardia
Case-Control Studies
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The increased intake of carbonated soft drinks parallels the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma. To determine whether an association exists between carbonated drink intake and esophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma, we analyzed data from a Swedish nationwide, population-based, case-control study. During data collection in 1995-1997, 189 patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (88% of all eligible), 262 patients with cardia adenocarcinoma (84%), and 820 control subjects (73%) were interviewed in person. All cancers were histologically classified. We calculated odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals using conditional logistic regression and multivariable analyses. Frequency of intake of carbonated soft drinks was not associated with risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma; high consumers (intake more than six times weekly) were at a statistically nonsignificantly decreased risk compared with never users (odds ratio = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.49 to 1.64). Consumption of carbonated low-alcohol beer and combined intake of carbonated drinks were not associated with risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. No association between intake of carbonated soft drinks or low-alcohol beer and risk of cardia adenocarcinoma was observed.
PubMed ID
16912268 View in PubMed
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Changes in beverage consumption in Norwegian children from 2001 to 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132271
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):379-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Tonje H Stea
Nina C Øverby
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway. tonje.h.stea@uia.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):379-85
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages - utilization
Carbonated Beverages
Child
Child Behavior
Diet - trends
Diet Surveys
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Female
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweetening Agents
Abstract
To analyse (i) differences in beverage pattern among Norwegian children in 2001 and 2008; (ii) beverage intake related to gender, parental education and family composition; and (iii) potential disparities in time trends among the different groups.
Within the Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks (FVMM) project, 6th and 7th grade pupils filled in a questionnaire about frequency of beverage intake (times/week) in 2001 and 2008.
Twenty-seven elementary schools in two Norwegian counties.
In 2001 a total of 1488 and in 2008 1339 pupils participated.
Between 2001 and 2008, a decreased consumption frequency of juice (from 3·6 to 3·4 times/week, P = 0·012), lemonade (from 4·8 to 2·5 times/week, P
PubMed ID
21835086 View in PubMed
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Changes in eating behaviour and food choices in families where the mother undergoes gastric bypass surgery for obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276824
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jan;70(1):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
M. Willmer
D. Berglind
P. Tynelius
A. Ghaderi
E. Näslund
F. Rasmussen
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jan;70(1):35-40
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent - surgery
Adult - surgery
Attitude to Health - surgery
Body Mass Index - surgery
Carbonated Beverages - surgery
Child - surgery
Diet - surgery
Eating - surgery
Family - surgery
Female - surgery
Food Habits - surgery
Food Preferences - surgery
Gastric Bypass - surgery
Humans - surgery
Male - surgery
Middle Aged - surgery
Mothers - surgery
Obesity - surgery
Spouses - surgery
Surveys and Questionnaires - surgery
Sweden - surgery
Weight Loss - surgery
Abstract
There is a lack of research exploring the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery on the patient's family's eating behaviour and food choices. The aim of the current study was to investigate changes in partners' and children's eating behaviour and food choices following maternal RYGB.
Sixty-nine women and their families were recruited from RYGB waiting lists at five Swedish surgical clinics. Data were collected during home visits 3 months before and 9 months after RYGB. Anthropometrical measures were taken, the adults completed the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire and the children completed the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT). All participants also completed a short food frequency questionnaire.
Changes in scores were analysed using paired t-tests for unadjusted estimates or linear regression models with robust variance (General Estimating Equations) in order to enable age- and sex-adjusted estimates for the children. There were no meaningful differences in the partners' eating behaviour or food choices. The boys, but not the girls, improved their ChEAT scores, as did the overweight/obese children in comparison with the normal-weight children. The boys, unlike the girls, also decreased their intake of soft drinks, as did the normal-weight children when compared with the overweight/obese children.
No clear-cut changes were found in partners' eating behaviour and food choices. Eating attitudes and soft drinks intake were improved among boys but not among girls. Differing modelling behaviour may partially explain these findings, but available data did not allow us to understand the underlying mechanisms.
PubMed ID
26330145 View in PubMed
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Cola intake and serum lipids in the Oslo Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147181
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Oct;34(5):901-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Arne Torbjørn Høstmark
Sissel Erland Tomten
Author Affiliation
Section of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Oslo Norway, Blindern, Oslo, Norway. a.t.hostmark@medisin.uio.no
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2009 Oct;34(5):901-6
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Abstract
Soft drinks can be a major source of sucrose, which may influence serum lipid concentration. We have examined the association between intake frequency of various types of soft drinks and the concentration of serum triglycerides (TG) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the cross-sectional Oslo Health Study. A total of 14 188 subjects of the altogether 18,770 participants of the study had data on intake frequency of colas and non-colas, with or without sugar. The population sample consisted of both sexes and 3 age groups: group 1 (30 years of age), group 2 (40 and 45 years of age), and group 3 (59-60 years of age). In both sexes, HDL decreased and TG increased significantly (p
PubMed ID
19935852 View in PubMed
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[Connection between of overweight and consumption confectionary, fast food stuffs and soft drinks. Widespread investigation Russian schoolchildren].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144422
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2010;79(1):52-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
I Ia Kon'
L Iu Volkova
N E Sannikova
A A Dzhumagaziev
I V Aleshina
M A Toboleva
M M Korosteleva
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2010;79(1):52-5
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Fast Foods - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Overweight appear one of the serious problem in European region WHO today. Obesity is polyetiological disease and result of different factors. The aim of the current studies was investigation of connection between consumption confectionary, fast food stuffs and soft drinks and body-mass index (BMI). At the beginning, was inspection of 434 schoolchildren 7-18 age old. As a result, was determined, that confectionary, fast food stuffs and soft drinks mach more popular, than ever stuffs. At the same time, was determined, that mean significance BMI was reliable above for children, who used confectionary, fast food stuffs and soft drinks frequently.
PubMed ID
20369626 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 2 of 9.