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Association between soft drink consumption, oral health and some lifestyle factors in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269469
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1039-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Agneta Hasselkvist
Anders Johansson
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1039-46
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages
Computers
DMF Index
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Meals
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Index
Sex Factors
Snacks
Sports
Sweden
Television
Tooth Erosion - classification
Toothbrushing
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the relationship between soft drink consumption, oral health and some lifestyle factors in Swedish adolescents.
A clinical dental examination and a questionnaire concerning lifestyle factors, including drinking habits, oral hygiene, dietary consumption, physical activity and screen-viewing habits were completed. Three hundred and ninety-two individuals completed the study (13-14 years, n = 195; 18-19 years, n = 197). The material was divided into high and low carbonated soft drink consumption groups, corresponding to approximately the highest and the lowest one-third of subjects in each age group. Differences between the groups were tested by the Mann-Whitney U-test and logistic regression.
Intake of certain dietary items, tooth brushing, sports activities, meal patterns, screen-viewing behaviors, BMI and parents born outside Sweden differed significantly between high and low consumers in one or both of the two age groups. Dental erosion (both age groups) and DMFT/DMFS (18-19 years group) were significantly higher in the high consumption groups. Logistic regression showed predictive variables for high consumption of carbonated soft drinks to be mainly gender (male), unhealthy dietary habits, lesser physical activity, higher BMI and longer time spent in front of TV/computer.
High soft drink consumption was related to poorer oral health and an unhealthier lifestyle.
PubMed ID
25183250 View in PubMed
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Beverage consumption of Canadian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152560
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Didier Garriguet
Author Affiliation
Health Information and Research Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6. didier.garriguet@statcan.gc.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):23-9
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholic Beverages - utilization
Animals
Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Caffeine
Canada
Carbonated Beverages - utilization
Central Nervous System Stimulants
Coffee
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Female
Fruit
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - utilization
Sex Factors
Tea
United States
Water
Young Adult
Abstract
According to results from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey-Nutrition, total beverage consumption among adults declined steadily with age. This reflects drops in the percentage of adults consuming most beverages and in the amounts consumed. While water was the beverage consumed most frequently and in the greatest quantity by adults, for many of them, coffee ranked second. Largely as a result of drinking coffee, more than 20% of men and 15% of women aged 31 to 70 exceeded the recommended maximum of 400 milligrams of caffeine per day. About 20% of men aged 19 to 70 consumed more than two alcoholic drinks a day. Owing to declines in the consumption of soft drinks and alcohol, the contribution of beverages to adults' total calorie intake falls at older ages. Regardless of age, men were generally more likely than women to report drinking most beverages, and those who did, drank more. There were, however, a few exceptions, with higher percentages of women than men reporting that they drank water and tea.
PubMed ID
19226924 View in PubMed
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Beverage consumption patterns of Canadian adults aged 19 to 65 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121161
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2175-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Nooshin Nikpartow
Adrienne D Danyliw
Susan J Whiting
Hyun J Lim
Hassanali Vatanparast
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2175-84
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Animals
Beer
Beverages
Canada
Carbonated Beverages
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Drinking
Educational Status
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Milk
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Sweetening Agents
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the beverage intake patterns of Canadian adults and explore characteristics of participants in different beverage clusters.
Analyses of nationally representative data with cross-sectional complex stratified design.
Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2 (2004).
A total of 14 277 participants aged 19-65 years, in whom dietary intake was assessed using a single 24 h recall, were included in the study. After determining total intake and the contribution of beverages to total energy intake among age/sex groups, cluster analysis (K-means method) was used to classify males and females into distinct clusters based on the dominant pattern of beverage intakes. To test differences across clusters, ?2 tests and 95 % confidence intervals of the mean intakes were used.
Six beverage clusters in women and seven beverage clusters in men were identified. 'Sugar-sweetened' beverage clusters - regular soft drinks and fruit drinks - as well as a 'beer' cluster, appeared for both men and women. No 'milk' cluster appeared among women. The mean consumption of the dominant beverage in each cluster was higher among men than women. The 'soft drink' cluster in men had the lowest proportion of the higher levels of education, and in women the highest proportion of inactivity, compared with other beverage clusters.
Patterns of beverage intake in Canadian women indicate high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages particularly fruit drinks, low intake of milk and high intake of beer. These patterns in women have implications for poor bone health, risk of obesity and other morbidities.
PubMed ID
22931911 View in PubMed
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Dental erosion and soft drink consumption in Swedish children and adolescents and the development of a simplified erosion partial recording system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137205
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(4):187-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Agneta Hasselkvist
Anders Johansson
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Author Affiliation
Public Dental Health, Orebro County Council, Orebro, Sweden. agneta.hasselkvist@orebroll.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(4):187-95
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Dental Enamel - pathology
Drinking Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Observer Variation
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Erosion - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of dental erosion among Swedish children and adolescents and to examine its relation to soft drink consumption. It was hypothesized that the prevalence of dental erosion would be higher in boys than girls,that it would show a correlation with soft drink consumption and that a further simplification ofa previously-used partial recording screening system for dental erosion would have an acceptable sensitivity and specificity. 801 individuals were invited to participate, of whom 609 (75%) accepted. 135 were 5-6 years, 227 were 13-14 years, and 247 were18-19 years old. A questionnaire survey of each individual's soft drink consumption habits, in addition to a clinical examination, were performed. Severe erosion extending into dentine on one or more maxillary anterior teeth/ molars was found to be 13.3% in the 5-6 group, 11.9% in 13-14 group and 22.3% in 18-19 group. The total prevalence for all age groups was 16.4%. The severity of erosion was highest among 18-19 year-old boys, 34.4 % of whom exhibited one or more teeth with severe erosive damage while none of the girls did so. Soft drink consumption was significantly correlated with severity of dental erosion in the 18-19 and 13-14 groups but not in the 5-6 years old group. A simplified erosion partial recording system (SEPRS) using 4 (permanent) or 6 (primary) surfaces as markers showed excellent sensitivity (100%/100%, respectively) and specificity (98%/100%, respectively) in relation to scoring of all maxillary canines/incisors and first permanent/all primary molars. In view of the high prevalence of dental erosion and soft drink consumption among Swedish children and adolescents reported here,there is clearly a need for a national epidemiological registration system as well as for community-based preventive programs to be implemented. The hypothesis that dental erosion would be higher in boys than girls and that it would show a correlation with soft drink intake was confirmed.
PubMed ID
21306084 View in PubMed
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Dental erosive wear and salivary flow rate in physically active young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125878
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2012;12:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Aida Mulic
Anne Bjørg Tveit
Dag Songe
Hanne Sivertsen
Anne B Skaare
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. aida.mulic@odont.uio.no
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2012;12:8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Citrus - adverse effects
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dentin - pathology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate
Tooth Erosion - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Little attention has been directed towards identifying the relationship between physical exercise, dental erosive wear and salivary secretion. The study aimed i) to describe the prevalence and severity of dental erosive wear among a group of physically active young adults, ii) to describe the patterns of dietary consumption and lifestyle among these individuals and iii) to study possible effect of exercise on salivary flow rate.
Young members (age range 18-32 years) of a fitness-centre were invited to participate in the study. Inclusion criteria were healthy young adults training hard at least twice a week. A non-exercising comparison group was selected from an ongoing study among 18-year-olds. Two hundred and twenty participants accepted an intraoral examination and completed a questionnaire. Seventy of the exercising participants provided saliva samples. The examination was performed at the fitness-centre or at a dental clinic (comparison group), using tested erosive wear system (VEDE). Saliva sampling (unstimulated and stimulated) was performed before and after exercise. Occlusal surfaces of the first molars in both jaws and the labial and palatal surfaces of the upper incisors and canines were selected as index teeth.
Dental erosive wear was registered in 64% of the exercising participants, more often in the older age group, and in 20% of the comparison group. Enamel lesions were most observed in the upper central incisors (33%); dentine lesions in lower first molar (27%). One fourth of the participants had erosive wear into dentine, significantly more in males than in females (p = 0.047). More participants with erosive wear had decreased salivary flow during exercise compared with the non-erosion group (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22443448 View in PubMed
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Exploring the association between television advertising of healthy and unhealthy foods, self-control, and food intake in three European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268470
Source
Appl Psychol Health Well Being. 2015 Mar;7(1):41-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Helge Giese
Laura M König
Diana Taut
Hanna Ollila
Adriana Baban
Pilvikki Absetz
Harald Schupp
Britta Renner
Source
Appl Psychol Health Well Being. 2015 Mar;7(1):41-62
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Advertising as Topic
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating - psychology
Female
Finland
Food Preferences - psychology
Germany
Humans
Male
Romania
Self-Control
Snacks
Social Class
Television
Young Adult
Abstract
Building upon previous results, the present study explored the relationship between exposure to unhealthy and healthy food TV commercials, trait self-control, and food intake.
In total, 825 Finns (53% female), 1,055 Germans (55% female), and 971 Romanians (55% female) aged 8-21 reported advertisement exposure, self-control, and food intake.
Altogether, participants indicated higher exposure to unhealthy compared to healthy food advertisements (F(1, 2848)?=?354.73, p?
PubMed ID
25363859 View in PubMed
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Gastric reflux is a significant causative factor of tooth erosion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88813
Source
J Dent Res. 2009 May;88(5):422-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Holbrook W P
Furuholm J.
Gudmundsson K.
Theodórs A.
Meurman J H
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Vatnsmyrarvegi 16, IS 101 Reykjavík, Iceland. phol@hi.is
Source
J Dent Res. 2009 May;88(5):422-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Beverages - adverse effects
Buffers
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dentin - pathology
Drug Therapy
Esophageal pH Monitoring
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications - microbiology
Gastroscopy
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Male
Manometry
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Saliva - physiology - secretion
Secretory Rate - physiology
Tooth Erosion - classification - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Dental erosion is caused by dietary or gastric acid. This study aimed to examine the location and severity of tooth erosion with respect to causative factors, and to determine whether the clinical pattern of erosion reflected the dominant etiological factor. The study involved 249 Icelandic individuals and included: a detailed medical history; clinical oral examination; salivary sampling, and analysis for flow rate, pH, and buffering capacity. Reflux was assessed in 91 individuals by gastroscopy, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour esophageal-pH monitoring. Reflux symptoms were reported by 36.5% individuals. Manometry results were abnormal in 8% of study participants, abnormal esophageal pH in 17.7%, and a pathological 24-hour pH recording in 21.3%. 3.6% were positive for Helicobacter pylori. Normal salivary flow was found in 92%, but low salivary buffering (10.4%) was associated with erosion into dentin (P
PubMed ID
19493884 View in PubMed
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Is consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks during pregnancy associated with birth weight?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292724
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2017 Oct; 13(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Jacob H Grundt
Geir Egil Eide
Anne-Lise Brantsaeter
Margaretha Haugen
Trond Markestad
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway.
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2017 Oct; 13(4):
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages
Diabetes, gestational
Dietary Sugars - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Exercise
Female
Fetal Development
Humans
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Obesity
Overweight
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
In Norway, there were parallel increases and subsequent decreases in birth weight (BW) and consumption of sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks (SSC) during the period 1990-2010, and by an ecological approach, we have suggested that the relationship was causal. The objective of this study was to examine if such a relationship was present in a prospectively followed cohort of pregnant women. The study population included 62,494 term singleton mother-infant dyads in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), a national prospective cohort study in Norway from 1999 to 2008. The association between SSC consumption and BW was assessed using multiple regression analyses with adjustment for potential confounders. Each 100 ml intake of SSC was associated with a 7.8 g (95% confidence interval [CI]: -10.3 to -5.3) decrease in BW, a decreased risk of BW > 4,500 g (odds ratio [OR]: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90 to 0.97) and a near significantly increased risk of BW  4,500 g (OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.39) and a trend towards significant increase in mean BW (25.1 g, 95% CI: -2.0 to 52.2) per 100 ml SSC. Our findings suggest that increasing consumption of rapidly absorbed sugar from SSC had opposite associations with BW in normal pregnancies and pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27928892 View in PubMed
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Occurrence of risk factors for dental erosion in the population of young adults in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124894
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;40(5):425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Øyvind Asmyhr
Jostein Grytten
Dorthe Holst
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Defence Medical Services, Sessvollmoen, Norway.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;40(5):425-31
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbonated Beverages
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Tooth Erosion - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of risk factors for dental erosion for a group of young adults who are particularly susceptible to erosion. Another aim was to describe the awareness of erosion and distribution of risk factors according to the educational background of the parents.
The sample (n = 2004 individuals) was randomly drawn from the population of 19-20-year-old Norwegians. The data were collected using telephone interviews. We measured awareness about erosion using the following question: 'Have you ever heard about dental erosion?' We obtained information about the frequency of intake of the following risk factors: soft drinks with and without sugar, and juice. Soft drinks with sugar included lemonade (Coca-Cola, Solo, Pepsi, Mozell and ice tea) and sport drinks (XL1, Maxim). Soft drinks without sugar included Cola light, Zero, PepsiMax, Solo light and ice tea light. Juice included orange, grapefruit, apple and kiwi juice. The parents' level of education was based on the Norwegian school system, which has three levels: compulsory schooling (10 years), upper secondary school education (up to 13 years) and university/college education. The data were analysed using logistic regressions analyses.
Awareness of erosion was high - 93.5% of respondents were aware of the problem. The majority of respondents believed that erosion can be prevented - altogether 84.9%. They also believed that soft drinks with and without sugar are equally important for the development of erosion. 17.5% of respondents drank soft drinks with sugar daily or several times a day. The corresponding figures for soft drinks without sugar and juice were 4.9% and 34.1%, respectively. Young adults with mothers with high education drank soft drinks both with and without sugar less frequently than those who had mothers with low education. This pattern was the opposite for juice.
Consumption of soft drinks and juice is high, even though awareness and knowledge about the causes of erosion are widespread. This indicates the need for effective intervention strategies to reduce the level of consumption. These strategies should take into account the fact that the distribution of risk factors is skewed with respect to parents' level of education.
PubMed ID
22537451 View in PubMed
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Oral health of individuals aged 3-80 years in Jönköping, Sweden, during 40 years (1973-2013). I. Review of findings on oral care habits and knowledge of oral health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269038
Source
Swed Dent J. 2015;39(2):57-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ola Norderyd
Göran Kochi
Apostolos Papias
Alkisti Anastassaki Köhler
Anna Nydell Helkimo
Carl-Otto Brahm
Ulrika Lindmark
Ninita Lindfors
Anna Mattsson
Bo Rolander
Christer Ullbro
Elisabeth Wárnberg Gerdin
Fredrik Frisk
Source
Swed Dent J. 2015;39(2):57-68
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carbonated Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology
Dental Caries - etiology
Dental Devices, Home Care - utilization
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the this study was to present data on oral care habits and knowledge of oral health in 2013, and to compare these data with results from a series of four previous cross-sectional epidemiological studies. All these studies were carried out in the city of Jönköping, Sweden, in 1973, 1983, 1993, 2003, and 2013. The 1973 study constituted a random sample of 1,ooo individuals evenly distributed in the age groups 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 years. The same age groups with addition of a group of 80-year-olds were included in the 1983, 1993, 2003, and 2013 studies, which comprised 1,104; 1,078; 987; and 1,010 individuals, respectively. A questionnaire about dental care habits and knowledge of oral health was used. The questionnaire contained the same questions in all the five studies, although some had to be slightly modernised during the 40-year period. During the period 1973-2013, a continous increase of individuals in the age group 20-60 years were treated by the Public Dental Service amounting to about 50%. Almost 70% of the 70- and 80-year-olds were treated by private practitioners. In 2013, 10-20% of the individuals in the age groups 30-40 years did not regularly visit neither Public Dental Service nor a private practitioner. The corresponding figures for the individuals 50-80 years old were 4-7%. Similar number of avoidance was reported in the previous studies. In the survey 2013, about 20-30% of the individuals in the age groups 20-50 felt frightened, sick, or ill at ease at the prospect of an appointment with the dentist. These findings were in agreement with the results from the surveys 1973-2003. Among the younger age groups, 0-15 years, a reduction in self-reported "ill at ease" was found in the surveys 2003 and 2013 compared to the previous surveys in this series. In 2013, the knowledge of the etiology of caries was known by about 60% of the individuals which was similar to that reported 1973-2003. Twenty per cent of the individuals stated that they did not know which etiological factors that causes caries. This percentage was equivalent during the period 1973-2013.About 85% of the individuals in all age groups brushed their teeth with fluoride tooth paste at least two times a day. These frequencies have gradually increased during the 40-year period. Around 40% in the age groups 50-80 years used toothpicks regularly in 2013. This is a about 1/3-1/2 less compared to 2003. In the age groups 20-40 years 3-14% used toothpicks for proximal cleaning in 2013. In 2013, about 35% of the individuals never consumed soft drinks, in comparison with 20% in 2003. In the age groups 3-20 years about 20% were consuming soft drinks every day or several times a week,which is a reduction by half compared to 2013.
PubMed ID
26529832 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.