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Adolescent impulsivity and soft drink consumption: The role of parental regulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277047
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jan 1;96:432-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2016
Author
Elisabeth L Melbye
Ingunn H Bergh
Solveig E S Hausken
Ester F C Sleddens
Kari Glavin
Nanna Lien
Mona Bjelland
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jan 1;96:432-42
Date
Jan-1-2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The present study aimed to explore the process in which impulsivity might influence soft drink consumption in adolescents, addressing potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulation regarding unhealthy eating. A cross-sectional survey was performed among 440 13-15-year-olds in Eastern Norway. The survey questionnaire included measures of impulsivity, six types of maternal and paternal regulation (as perceived by the adolescents), and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Parallel multiple-mediator analyses were performed to reveal potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulatory behaviors on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. Separate models were run for maternal and paternal regulation. Results from our model analyses (both maternal and paternal models) indicated that all the six measured parental regulatory behaviors jointly acted as mediators on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. However, only perceived maternal and paternal legitimacy of regulation showed a unique contribution to the mediated effect. This finding suggests that adolescents' perception of parental legitimate authority is of particular importance in explaining the relationship between impulsivity and unhealthy eating behaviors in adolescents. Future nutrition interventions targeting adolescents and their parents should take personal factors such as adolescents' level of impulsivity into account. Ultimately; what may be an appropriate approach to impulsive individuals and their parents may diverge from what may be an appropriate approach to less impulsive individuals and their parents.
PubMed ID
26456410 View in PubMed
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Does tracking of dietary behaviours differ by parental education in children during the transition into adolescence?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121842
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):673-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Torunn H Totland
Mekdes K Gebremariam
Nanna Lien
Mona Bjelland
May Grydeland
Ingunn H Bergh
Knut-Inge Klepp
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway. t.h.totland@medisin.uio.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):673-82
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages - analysis
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Internet
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Parents - education
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweetening Agents - administration & dosage
Vegetables
Abstract
The present study investigates the changes and tracking of dietary behaviours in Norwegian 11-year-olds and examines the association between parental education and dietary tracking over a time period of 20 months.
Longitudinal data from the Norwegian HEalth In Adolescents (HEIA) cohort study followed up at three time points (2007-2009).
Intakes of fruits, vegetables and snacks were assessed by frequency and intakes of sugar-sweetened soft drinks and squash were assessed by frequency and amount. Tracking of dietary behaviours was assessed by adolescents' relative position in rank over time and Cohen's kappa was used to measure tracking coefficients. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between parental education and the tracking of dietary behaviours.
In total, 885 adolescents from the HEIA cohort study participated by answering Internet-based questionnaires at three time points.
The results indicated that boys and girls maintained their relative position in rank of dietary intake over time, when grouped by baseline consumption. Fair to moderate tracking coefficients of dietary variables were observed. An inverse association was found between parental education and stability of soft drink and squash consumption during the 20 months.
The observed tracking pattern indicates the importance of promoting healthy dietary behaviours at an even earlier age. Furthermore, interventions should focus particularly on adolescents from families with low parental education and their consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.
PubMed ID
22874120 View in PubMed
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Perceived rules and accessibility: measurement and mediating role in the association between parental education and vegetable and soft drink intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286563
Source
Nutr J. 2016 Aug 17;15(1):76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-17-2016
Author
Mekdes K Gebremariam
Nanna Lien
Liv Elin Torheim
Lene F Andersen
Elisabeth L Melbye
Kari Glavin
Solveig E S Hausken
Ester F C Sleddens
Mona Bjelland
Source
Nutr J. 2016 Aug 17;15(1):76
Date
Aug-17-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Educational Status
Female
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Parenting
Parents - education - psychology
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
The existence of socioeconomic differences in dietary behaviors is well documented. However, studies exploring the mechanisms behind these differences among adolescents using comprehensive and reliable measures of mediators are lacking. The aims of this study were (a) to assess the psychometric properties of new scales assessing the perceived rules and accessibility related to the consumption of vegetables and soft drinks and (b) to explore their mediating role in the association between parental education and the corresponding dietary behaviors.
A cross-sectional survey including 440 adolescents from three counties in Norway (mean age 14.3?years (SD?=?0.6)) was conducted using a web-based questionnaire. Principal component analysis, test-retest and internal reliability analysis were conducted. The mediating role of perceived accessibility and perceived rules in the association between parental education and the dietary behaviors was explored using linear regression analyses.
Factor analyses confirmed two separate subscales, named "accessibility" and "rules", both for vegetables and soft drinks (factor loadings >0.60). The scales had good internal consistency reliability (0.70-0.87). The test-retest reliability of the scales was moderate to good (0.44-0.62). Parental education was inversely related to the consumption of soft drinks and positively related to the consumption of vegetables. Perceived accessibility and perceived rules related to soft drink consumption were found to mediate the association between parental education and soft drink consumption (47.5 and 8.5?% of total effect mediated). Accessibility of vegetables was found to mediate the association between parental education and the consumption of vegetables (51?% of total effect mediated).
The new scales developed in this study are comprehensive and have adequate validity and reliability; they are therefore considered appropriate for use among 13-15 year-olds. Parents, in particular those with a low educational background, should be encouraged to increase the accessibility of vegetables and to decrease the accessibility of soft drinks, in particular during dinner. Enforcing parental rules limiting soft drink intake in families with low parental education also appears relevant.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27530159 View in PubMed
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The relationship between parental education and adolescents' soft drink intake from the age of 11-13 years, and possible mediating effects of availability and accessibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116645
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Sep 14;110(5):926-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-14-2013
Author
Torunn H Totland
Nanna Lien
Ingunn H Bergh
Mona Bjelland
Mekdes K Gebremariam
Knut-Inge Klepp
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Sep 14;110(5):926-33
Date
Sep-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages - supply & distribution
Child
Female
Health education
Humans
Male
Norway
Parents - education
Time Factors
Abstract
The present study examined the prospective relationship between parental education and adolescents' soft drink intake over 20 months, and possible mediating effects of adolescents' availability and accessibility of soft drinks at home. A total of 866 adolescents, with data on two time points in the Norwegian HEalth In Adolescents (HEIA) cohort study (2007-9), were included in the analyses. Data on intake and determinants of soft drinks were collected from adolescents and both parents by questionnaires. Mediation analyses using linear regression investigated the total and direct effects of parental education on adolescents' soft drink intake from the age of 11-13 years. In order to investigate prospective relationships, two models were set up to measure the (1) prediction and (2) change in consumption over 20 months. Possible mediation effects of availability and perceived accessibility at home were further examined in both models. The results showed that a lower level of parental education predicted a higher intake of soft drinks among adolescents after 20 months, and that higher perceived accessibility of soft drinks reported by adolescents and mothers explained 39 % of the total effect. No relationship was observed between parental education and the change in adolescents' intake of soft drinks over 20 months. Interventions aimed at families with low parental education should target the perceived accessibility of soft drinks at home in order to diminish social differences in adolescents' soft drink consumption.
PubMed ID
23375110 View in PubMed
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