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Relationship between dental erosion, soft drink consumption, and gastroesophageal reflux among Icelanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71149
Source
Clin Oral Investig. 2004 Jun;8(2):91-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
T. Jensdottir
I B Arnadottir
I. Thorsdottir
A. Bardow
K. Gudmundsson
A. Theodors
W P Holbrook
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Medicine, Dental School of Copenhagen, University of Copenhagen, Nørre Alle 20, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. tje@odont.ku.dk
Source
Clin Oral Investig. 2004 Jun;8(2):91-6
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects - classification
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications
Humans
Iceland
Incisor - pathology
Male
Molar - pathology
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rural Health
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Tooth Erosion - classification - etiology
Urban health
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dental erosion in young Icelandic adults (19-22 years old) and patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in relation to their soft drink consumption and gastroesophageal reflux. Eighty subjects (40 males and 40 females), comprising 57 young adults (mean age 21 +/- 2 years) and 23 GERD patients (mean age 35 +/- 10 years), were enrolled in this study. All subjects answered a detailed frequency questionnaire of soft drink consumption and participated in a clinical examination. Erosion was scored for incisor and molar teeth separately. No significant difference was observed in the prevalence of dental erosion between young adults and GERD patients. However, by combining the two study groups a three-fold higher risk of having erosion in molars or incisors was found for subjects drinking Coca-Cola three times a week or more often ( p
PubMed ID
14745590 View in PubMed
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