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Television in the bedroom and increased body weight: potential explanations for their relationship among European schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118120
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2013 Apr;8(2):130-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
A J Cameron
M M van Stralen
J. Brug
J. Salmon
E. Bere
M J M Chinapaw
I. De Bourdeaudhuij
N. Jan
Y. Manios
L A Moreno
S J Velde
Author Affiliation
Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia.
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2013 Apr;8(2):130-41
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Belgium - epidemiology
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Female
Greece - epidemiology
Humans
Hungary - epidemiology
Male
Motor Activity
Netherlands - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Overweight - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Sleep
Slovenia - epidemiology
Spain - epidemiology
Television - statistics & numerical data
Weight Gain
Abstract
A television in the bedroom is associated with measures of adiposity. We aimed to test if this association is mediated by any of (i) time spent watching television, (ii) sleep duration, (iii) physical activity level or (iv) consumption of soft drinks.
Data were from 7234 boys and girls aged 10-12 years in European countries involved in the EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth project (Belgium, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia and Spain). Waist circumference, height and weight were measured. The presence of a bedroom television, television viewing time, sleep duration, physical activity time and soft drink consumption were assessed by standardized questionnaires.
Almost 40% of schoolchildren had a bedroom television, with the highest percentage among Hungarian children (65%) and lowest for Belgian, Slovenian and Spanish children (all ?28%). A television in the bedroom was positively associated with time spent watching television, soft drink consumption and overweight and obesity (all P?
PubMed ID
23239631 View in PubMed
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