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Adolescent impulsivity and soft drink consumption: The role of parental regulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277047
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jan 1;96:432-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2016
Author
Elisabeth L Melbye
Ingunn H Bergh
Solveig E S Hausken
Ester F C Sleddens
Kari Glavin
Nanna Lien
Mona Bjelland
Source
Appetite. 2016 Jan 1;96:432-42
Date
Jan-1-2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The present study aimed to explore the process in which impulsivity might influence soft drink consumption in adolescents, addressing potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulation regarding unhealthy eating. A cross-sectional survey was performed among 440 13-15-year-olds in Eastern Norway. The survey questionnaire included measures of impulsivity, six types of maternal and paternal regulation (as perceived by the adolescents), and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Parallel multiple-mediator analyses were performed to reveal potential mediating effects of perceived parental regulatory behaviors on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. Separate models were run for maternal and paternal regulation. Results from our model analyses (both maternal and paternal models) indicated that all the six measured parental regulatory behaviors jointly acted as mediators on the association between adolescent impulsivity and SSB consumption. However, only perceived maternal and paternal legitimacy of regulation showed a unique contribution to the mediated effect. This finding suggests that adolescents' perception of parental legitimate authority is of particular importance in explaining the relationship between impulsivity and unhealthy eating behaviors in adolescents. Future nutrition interventions targeting adolescents and their parents should take personal factors such as adolescents' level of impulsivity into account. Ultimately; what may be an appropriate approach to impulsive individuals and their parents may diverge from what may be an appropriate approach to less impulsive individuals and their parents.
PubMed ID
26456410 View in PubMed
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Association between intake of artificially sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverages and preterm delivery: a large prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122026
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):552-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Linda Englund-Ögge
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margareta Haugen
Verena Sengpiel
Ali Khatibi
Ronny Myhre
Solveig Myking
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Marian Kacerovsky
Roy M Nilsen
Bo Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. linda.englund-ogge@vgregion.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):552-9
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Norway
Obstetric Labor, Premature - etiology
Overweight - complications
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Single Person
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweetening Agents - adverse effects
Thinness - complications
Abstract
Artificially sweetened (AS) and sugar-sweetened (SS) beverages are commonly consumed during pregnancy. A recent Danish study reported that the daily intake of an AS beverage was associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery.
We examined the intake of AS and SS beverages in pregnant women to replicate the Danish study and observe whether AS intake is indeed associated with preterm delivery.
This was a prospective study of 60,761 pregnant women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Intakes of carbonated and noncarbonated AS and SS beverages and use of artificial sweeteners in hot drinks were assessed by a self-reported food-frequency questionnaire in midpregnancy. Preterm delivery was the primary outcome, and data were obtained from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry.
Intakes of both AS and SS beverages increased with increasing BMI and energy intake and were higher in women with less education, in daily smokers, and in single women. A high intake of AS beverages was associated with preterm delivery; the adjusted OR for those drinking >1 serving/d was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.24). Drinking >1 serving of SS beverages per day was also associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery (adjusted OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.45). The trend tests were positive for both beverage types.
This study suggests that a high intake of both AS and SS beverages is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery.
Notes
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Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):22423283681
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):224-523405391
PubMed ID
22854404 View in PubMed
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Association between soft drink consumption, oral health and some lifestyle factors in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269469
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1039-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Agneta Hasselkvist
Anders Johansson
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1039-46
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages
Computers
DMF Index
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Meals
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Index
Sex Factors
Snacks
Sports
Sweden
Television
Tooth Erosion - classification
Toothbrushing
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the relationship between soft drink consumption, oral health and some lifestyle factors in Swedish adolescents.
A clinical dental examination and a questionnaire concerning lifestyle factors, including drinking habits, oral hygiene, dietary consumption, physical activity and screen-viewing habits were completed. Three hundred and ninety-two individuals completed the study (13-14 years, n = 195; 18-19 years, n = 197). The material was divided into high and low carbonated soft drink consumption groups, corresponding to approximately the highest and the lowest one-third of subjects in each age group. Differences between the groups were tested by the Mann-Whitney U-test and logistic regression.
Intake of certain dietary items, tooth brushing, sports activities, meal patterns, screen-viewing behaviors, BMI and parents born outside Sweden differed significantly between high and low consumers in one or both of the two age groups. Dental erosion (both age groups) and DMFT/DMFS (18-19 years group) were significantly higher in the high consumption groups. Logistic regression showed predictive variables for high consumption of carbonated soft drinks to be mainly gender (male), unhealthy dietary habits, lesser physical activity, higher BMI and longer time spent in front of TV/computer.
High soft drink consumption was related to poorer oral health and an unhealthier lifestyle.
PubMed ID
25183250 View in PubMed
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Associations between schools' guidelines and pupils' smoking and sweet consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261055
Source
Community Dent Health. 2014 Dec;31(4):234-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
R. Kankaanpää
M. Tolvanen
J. Anttila
S. Lahti
Source
Community Dent Health. 2014 Dec;31(4):234-9
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude to Health
Candy
Carbonated Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Finland
Food Dispensers, Automatic
Food Habits
Food Services
Guidelines as Topic
Health Behavior
Humans
Oral Health
Organizational Policy
Schools - organization & administration
Smoking - prevention & control
Snacks
Students
Tobacco, Smokeless
Abstract
The aims were to find out if schools' sweet-selling was associated with pupils' sweet consumption, and whether the school's guideline about leaving the school area was associated with pupils' tobacco and sweet consumption.
Two independently collected datasets from all Finnish upper secondary schools (N = 988) were linked together. The first dataset on schools' sweet-selling (yes/no) and guideline about leaving school area (yes/no) was collected via school principals in 2007 using an Internet questionnaire with a response rate of 49%, n = 480. The second dataset on pupils' self-reported: weekly school-time (0, never; 1, less than once; 2, 1-2 times; 3, 3-5 times), overall sweet consumption frequencies (1, never; 2, 1-2 times; 3, 3-5 times; 4, 6-7 times) and smoking and snuff-using frequencies (1, never; 2, every now and then; 3 = every day) was collected in 2006-2007 in the School Health Promotion Study from pupils. An average was calculated for the school-level with a response rate 80%, n = 790. The total response rate of the linked final data was 42%, n = 414. Mean values of self-reported sweet and tobacco consumption frequencies between sweet-selling and non-sweet-selling schools and between schools with different guidelines were compared using Mann-Whitney test.
Pupils in sweet-selling schools and in schools without a guideline about leaving the school area, more frequently used sweet products and tobacco products than their peers in other schools.
Schools may need help in building permanent guidelines to stop sweet-selling in school and to prevent leaving the school area to decrease pupils' sweet consumption and smoking.
PubMed ID
25665357 View in PubMed
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Awareness and attitudes related to dental erosive wear among 18-yr-old adolescents in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107307
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2013 Oct;121(5):471-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Rasa Skudutyte-Rysstad
Aida Mulic
Marit Slåttelid Skeie
Anne B Skaare
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology and Gerodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2013 Oct;121(5):471-6
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Dental Enamel - pathology
Female
Food Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Tooth Erosion - etiology - pathology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to describe awareness and attitudes related to dental erosive wear among 18-yr-old adolescents in Oslo and to explore attitudinal differences between participants with and without the condition. All 18-yr-old subjects scheduled for their routine examination at the Public Dental Service clinics during 2008 (n = 3,206) were invited, and 1,456 agreed to participate (a response rate of 45%). The data were collected using structured questionnaires and by clinical examination of the participants. Dental erosive wear was assessed using a pictorial manual - the Visual Erosion Dental Examination scoring system - as a guide. Overall, 88% of participants had heard about dental erosive wear; however, of participants with erosive lesions only 56% were aware of, and only 47% could recall their dentist mentioning, the condition. Participants with erosive wear were more likely to have low or moderate positive attitudes towards acidic drink consumption and to be reluctant to change. In multivariate analyses controlling for gender and behavioural variables, weak or moderate positive awareness of acidic drinks remained significantly associated with higher erosion risk. This study emphasizes the importance of assessment and understanding of awareness and attitudinal aspects in relation to dental erosive wear.
PubMed ID
24028596 View in PubMed
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Beverage consumption in an Alaska Native village: a mixed-methods study of behaviour, attitudes and access.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280274
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:29905
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Deena Elwan
Peter de Schweinitz
Janet M Wojcicki
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:29905
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health
Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Carbonated Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Child
Energy Drinks - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology
Rural Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) have the highest prevalence of obesity for any racial/ethnic group. Previous studies examining risk factors for obesity have identified excessive sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) and inadequate water consumption as major risk factors for this population group. The historical scarcity of water in rural Alaska may explain consumption patterns including reliance on SSBs and other packaged drinks.
Our study was designed to assess SSB, water and other beverage consumption and attitudes towards consumption in Alaska Native children and adults residing in rural Alaska. During summer 2014, 2 focus groups were conducted employing community members in a small rural village more than 200 air miles west of Fairbanks, Alaska. Interviews were completed with shop owners, Early Head Start and Head Start program instructors (n=7). SSB and total beverage intakes were measured using a modified version of the BEVQ-15, (n=69).
High rates of SSB consumption (defined as sweetened juice beverages, soda, sweet tea, energy drink or sports drinks) and low rates of water consumption were reported for all age groups in the village. All adolescents and 81% of children reported drinking SSBs at least once per week in the last month, and 48% of adolescents and 29% of younger children reported daily consumption. Fifty-two per cent of adults reported consuming SSBs at least once per week and 20% reported daily consumption. Twenty-five per cent of adolescents reported never drinking water in the past month, and 19% of younger children and 21% of adults did not consume water daily.
Alaska Native children and adults living in the Interior Alaska consume high amounts of SSBs including energy drinks and insufficient amounts of water. Interventions targeting beverage consumption are urgently needed for the Alaska Native population in rural Alaska.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26928369 View in PubMed
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Beverage consumption patterns of Canadian adults aged 19 to 65 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121161
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2175-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Nooshin Nikpartow
Adrienne D Danyliw
Susan J Whiting
Hyun J Lim
Hassanali Vatanparast
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2175-84
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Animals
Beer
Beverages
Canada
Carbonated Beverages
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Drinking
Educational Status
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Milk
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Sweetening Agents
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the beverage intake patterns of Canadian adults and explore characteristics of participants in different beverage clusters.
Analyses of nationally representative data with cross-sectional complex stratified design.
Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2 (2004).
A total of 14 277 participants aged 19-65 years, in whom dietary intake was assessed using a single 24 h recall, were included in the study. After determining total intake and the contribution of beverages to total energy intake among age/sex groups, cluster analysis (K-means method) was used to classify males and females into distinct clusters based on the dominant pattern of beverage intakes. To test differences across clusters, ?2 tests and 95 % confidence intervals of the mean intakes were used.
Six beverage clusters in women and seven beverage clusters in men were identified. 'Sugar-sweetened' beverage clusters - regular soft drinks and fruit drinks - as well as a 'beer' cluster, appeared for both men and women. No 'milk' cluster appeared among women. The mean consumption of the dominant beverage in each cluster was higher among men than women. The 'soft drink' cluster in men had the lowest proportion of the higher levels of education, and in women the highest proportion of inactivity, compared with other beverage clusters.
Patterns of beverage intake in Canadian women indicate high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages particularly fruit drinks, low intake of milk and high intake of beer. These patterns in women have implications for poor bone health, risk of obesity and other morbidities.
PubMed ID
22931911 View in PubMed
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Changes in beverage consumption in Norwegian children from 2001 to 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132271
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):379-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Tonje H Stea
Nina C Øverby
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway. tonje.h.stea@uia.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):379-85
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages - utilization
Carbonated Beverages
Child
Child Behavior
Diet - trends
Diet Surveys
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Female
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweetening Agents
Abstract
To analyse (i) differences in beverage pattern among Norwegian children in 2001 and 2008; (ii) beverage intake related to gender, parental education and family composition; and (iii) potential disparities in time trends among the different groups.
Within the Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks (FVMM) project, 6th and 7th grade pupils filled in a questionnaire about frequency of beverage intake (times/week) in 2001 and 2008.
Twenty-seven elementary schools in two Norwegian counties.
In 2001 a total of 1488 and in 2008 1339 pupils participated.
Between 2001 and 2008, a decreased consumption frequency of juice (from 3·6 to 3·4 times/week, P = 0·012), lemonade (from 4·8 to 2·5 times/week, P
PubMed ID
21835086 View in PubMed
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Changes in eating behaviour and food choices in families where the mother undergoes gastric bypass surgery for obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276824
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jan;70(1):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
M. Willmer
D. Berglind
P. Tynelius
A. Ghaderi
E. Näslund
F. Rasmussen
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jan;70(1):35-40
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent - surgery
Adult - surgery
Attitude to Health - surgery
Body Mass Index - surgery
Carbonated Beverages - surgery
Child - surgery
Diet - surgery
Eating - surgery
Family - surgery
Female - surgery
Food Habits - surgery
Food Preferences - surgery
Gastric Bypass - surgery
Humans - surgery
Male - surgery
Middle Aged - surgery
Mothers - surgery
Obesity - surgery
Spouses - surgery
Surveys and Questionnaires - surgery
Sweden - surgery
Weight Loss - surgery
Abstract
There is a lack of research exploring the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery on the patient's family's eating behaviour and food choices. The aim of the current study was to investigate changes in partners' and children's eating behaviour and food choices following maternal RYGB.
Sixty-nine women and their families were recruited from RYGB waiting lists at five Swedish surgical clinics. Data were collected during home visits 3 months before and 9 months after RYGB. Anthropometrical measures were taken, the adults completed the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire and the children completed the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT). All participants also completed a short food frequency questionnaire.
Changes in scores were analysed using paired t-tests for unadjusted estimates or linear regression models with robust variance (General Estimating Equations) in order to enable age- and sex-adjusted estimates for the children. There were no meaningful differences in the partners' eating behaviour or food choices. The boys, but not the girls, improved their ChEAT scores, as did the overweight/obese children in comparison with the normal-weight children. The boys, unlike the girls, also decreased their intake of soft drinks, as did the normal-weight children when compared with the overweight/obese children.
No clear-cut changes were found in partners' eating behaviour and food choices. Eating attitudes and soft drinks intake were improved among boys but not among girls. Differing modelling behaviour may partially explain these findings, but available data did not allow us to understand the underlying mechanisms.
PubMed ID
26330145 View in PubMed
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[Connection between of overweight and consumption confectionary, fast food stuffs and soft drinks. Widespread investigation Russian schoolchildren].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144422
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2010;79(1):52-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
I Ia Kon'
L Iu Volkova
N E Sannikova
A A Dzhumagaziev
I V Aleshina
M A Toboleva
M M Korosteleva
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2010;79(1):52-5
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Fast Foods - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Overweight appear one of the serious problem in European region WHO today. Obesity is polyetiological disease and result of different factors. The aim of the current studies was investigation of connection between consumption confectionary, fast food stuffs and soft drinks and body-mass index (BMI). At the beginning, was inspection of 434 schoolchildren 7-18 age old. As a result, was determined, that confectionary, fast food stuffs and soft drinks mach more popular, than ever stuffs. At the same time, was determined, that mean significance BMI was reliable above for children, who used confectionary, fast food stuffs and soft drinks frequently.
PubMed ID
20369626 View in PubMed
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46 records – page 1 of 5.