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Carboxyhemoglobin measurement by hospitals: implications for the diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168666
Source
J Emerg Med. 2006 Jul;31(1):13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Neil B Hampson
Karen L Scott
Jennette L Zmaeff
Author Affiliation
Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Center for Hyperbaric Medicine, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA.
Source
J Emerg Med. 2006 Jul;31(1):13-6
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning - blood - diagnosis - therapy
Carboxyhemoglobin - analysis
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Idaho
Montana
Oximetry
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Washington
Abstract
Most case definitions for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning include demonstration of an elevated blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) concentration. Further, it is generally believed that treatment of CO poisoning is more effective when performed as soon as possible after the exposure. This suggests that a hospital's inability to measure blood COHb could lead to delayed or missed diagnosis or treatment. This study evaluated the ability of hospitals in the Pacific Northwest to measure COHb levels. The clinical laboratory of every acute care hospital in Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Alaska was surveyed regarding the ability to measure COHb levels, the method utilized and the time required. If they could not measure COHb, they were asked whether samples are sent elsewhere, the location of the referral laboratory, and time required. Results were then compared to the list of hospitals referring CO-poisoned patients to a regional center for hyperbaric oxygen therapy from 2003-2004. In the four states, only 44% of acute care hospitals have the capability to measure COHb. The remaining 56% send blood samples to other laboratories. The average time to get a result is 10 +/- 10 min in hospitals with co-oximetry and 904 +/- 1360 min in those without, a difference of 15 h (p
PubMed ID
16798147 View in PubMed
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