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126 records – page 1 of 13.

The 3-year follow-up study in a block of flats - experiences in the use of the Finnish indoor climate classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185305
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
M. Tuomainen
A. Tuomainen
J. Liesivuori
A-L Pasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, Finland. marja.tuomainen@hengitysliitto.fi
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air pollution, indoor
Allergens - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Asthma - prevention & control
Bacteria
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Construction Materials - standards
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Housing - standards
Humans
Humidity
Questionnaires
Spores, Fungal
Temperature
Abstract
Indoor climate of two new blocks of flats was investigated. The case building was built for people with respiratory diseases by following the instructions of the Finnish Classification of Indoor Climate, Construction and Finishing Materials, while the control building was built using conventional building technology. The main indoor air parameters (temperature, relative humidity and levels of CO, CO2, ammonia, total volatile organic compounds, total suspended particles, fungal spores, bacteria and cat, dog and house dust mite allergens) were measured in six apartments of both the buildings on five occasions during the 3-year occupancy. In addition, a questionnaire to evaluate symptoms of the occupants and their satisfaction with their home environment was conducted in connection with indoor air quality (IAQ) measurements. The levels of indoor air pollutants in the case building were, in general, lower than those in the control building. In addition, the asthmatic occupants informed that their symptoms had decreased during the occupancy in the case building. This case study showed that high IAQ is possible to reach by careful design, proper materials and equipment and on high-quality construction with reasonable additional costs. In addition, the study indicated that good IAQ can also be maintained during the occupancy, if sufficient information on factors affecting IAQ and guidance on proper use and care of equipment are available for occupants.
PubMed ID
12756007 View in PubMed
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Aalborg, Denmark: a role model for waste management practices to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98696
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):837-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009

Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293496
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Camilla Sjörs
Fredrik Hedenus
Arvid Sjölander
Annika Tillander
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB),Karolinska Institutet,Nobels väg 12a,SE-171 77 Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Exercise
Female
Greenhouse Gases - analysis
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Recommended dietary allowances
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults.
Diet was assessed by 4d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored.
Sweden.
Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years.
Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27 % in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12 % in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively.
The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.
PubMed ID
28879831 View in PubMed
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Air contaminants in a submarine equipped with air independent propulsion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166824
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Nov;8(11):1111-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Ola Persson
Christina Ostberg
Joakim Pagels
Aleksandra Sebastian
Author Affiliation
Division of Heat Transfer, Department of Heat and Power Engineering, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, 221 00, Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Nov;8(11):1111-21
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - standards
Carbon Dioxide - analysis - standards
Ecological Systems, Closed
Environmental Monitoring - standards
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Humans
Hydrogen - analysis - standards
Life Support Systems
Organic Chemicals - analysis - standards
Oxygen - analysis - standards
Ozone - analysis - standards
Pressure
Submarine Medicine
Sweden
Temperature
Volatilization
Abstract
The Swedish Navy has operated submarines equipped with air independent propulsion for two decades. This type of submarine can stay submerged for periods far longer than other non-nuclear submarines are capable of. The air quality during longer periods of submersion has so far not been thoroughly investigated. This study presents results for a number of air quality parameters obtained during more than one week of continuous submerged operation. The measured parameters are pressure, temperature, relative humidity, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter and microbiological contaminants. The measurements of airborne particles demonstrate that air pollutants typically occur at a low baseline level due to high air exchange rates and efficient air-cleaning devices. However, short-lived peaks with comparatively high concentrations occur, several of the sources for these have been identified. The concentrations of the pollutants measured in this study do not indicate a build-up of hazardous compounds during eight days of submersion. It is reasonable to assume that a substantial build-up of the investigated contaminants is not likely if the submersion period is prolonged several times, which is the case for modern submarines equipped with air independent propulsion.
PubMed ID
17075617 View in PubMed
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Air quality during the winter in Qu├ębec day-care centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224262
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):432-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
S. Daneault
M. Beausoleil
K. Messing
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Biological Interactions between Health and Environment, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):432-4
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Electric Power Supplies
Environmental monitoring
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Heating - methods - standards
Humans
Humidity
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Quebec
Temperature
Time Factors
Ventilation - methods - standards
Abstract
Over 90% of 91 day care centers in greater Montréal, Québec exceeded 1000 ppm of CO2 during January through April 1989. Four variables were independent positive predictors of CO2 levels: the density of children in the center; presence of electric heating; absence of a ventilation system; and building age. High levels of CO2 are associated with respiratory tract and other symptoms. Clear standards and inspection policies should be established for day care center air quality.
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Dec 2;299(6712):1388-902513974
Cites: J Occup Med. 1987 Jan;29(1):57-623546636
Cites: Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1985;36:1-393866314
Cites: Environ Res. 1989 Oct;50(1):37-552792060
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Dec 8;289(6458):1573-56439323
Cites: Rev Infect Dis. 1986 Jul-Aug;8(4):514-203529306
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1987 May;79(5):685-7003571762
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1985 Aug 10;291(6492):373-63926199
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Sep;78(9):1175-73407814
PubMed ID
1536362 View in PubMed
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Source
Curr Biol. 2010 Mar 23;20(6):R255-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-2010

Aromatic amino acid requirements in healthy men measured by indicator amino acid oxidation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171278
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jan;83(1):82-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Jean W-C Hsu
Laksiri A Goonewardene
Mahroukh Rafii
Ronald O Ball
Paul B Pencharz
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jan;83(1):82-8
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acids, Aromatic - administration & dosage - metabolism
Breath Tests
Canada
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Isotopes
Cross-Over Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Linear Models
Lysine - metabolism
Male
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Oxidation-Reduction
Phenylalanine - administration & dosage - metabolism
Tyrosine - administration & dosage - metabolism
Abstract
In the current literature, no agreement exists on estimates for aromatic amino acid (phenylalanine plus tyrosine) requirements as measured by stable-isotope techniques.
The goal of the present study was to determine the phenylalanine requirement in healthy men who were fed a diet without tyrosine by using the indicator amino acid oxidation method.
Five healthy men were assigned to receive in random order diets devoid of tyrosine and with 8 graded intakes of phenylalanine (5, 10, 15, 25, 35, 45, 60, and 70 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)). The phenylalanine requirement was measured by the rate of 13CO2 release (F13CO2) from L-[1-(13)C]lysine oxidation.
The graded intakes of phenylalanine had no effect on lysine flux, as required for this method. The phenylalanine (ie, total aromatic amino acid) requirement, in the absence of tyrosine, was estimated to be 48 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) by applying a two-phase linear regression crossover model to the F13CO2 data.
In the absence of tyrosine, the mean phenylalanine requirement is higher than the current FAO/WHO/UNU (1985) and Dietary Reference Intake (2002) recommendations.
PubMed ID
16400054 View in PubMed
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Assessing the impacts of changes in treatment technology on energy and greenhouse gas balances for organic waste and wastewater treatment using historical data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98881
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):861-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Tjalfe G Poulsen
Jens Aage Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. tgp@bio.aau.dk
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):861-70
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Cities
Denmark
Global warming
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Management - methods - statistics & numerical data
Waste Products - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Historical data on organic waste and wastewater treatment during the period of 1970-2020 were used to assess the impact of treatment on energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) balances. The assessment included the waste fractions: Sewage sludge, food waste, yard waste and other organic waste (paper, plastic, etc.). Data were collected from Aalborg, a municipality located in Northern Denmark. During the period from 1970-2005, Aalborg Municipality has changed its waste treatment strategy from landfilling of all wastes toward composting of yard waste and incineration with combined heat and power production from the remaining organic municipal waste. Wastewater treatment has changed from direct discharge of untreated wastewater to full organic matter and nutrient (N, P) removal combined with anaerobic digestion of the sludge for biogas production with power and heat generation. These changes in treatment technology have resulted in the waste and wastewater treatment systems in Aalborg progressing from being net consumers of energy and net emitters of GHG, to becoming net producers of energy and net savers of GHG emissions (due to substitution of fossil fuels elsewhere). If it is assumed that the organic waste quantity and composition is the same in 1970 and 2005, the technology change over this time period has resulted in a progression from a net annual GHG emission of 200 kg CO( 2)-eq. capita(-1) in 1970 to a net saving of 170 kg CO(2)-eq. capita(-1) in 2005 for management of urban organic wastes.
PubMed ID
19767326 View in PubMed
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Assessment of indoor environmental quality in existing multi-family buildings in North-East Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268743
Source
Environ Int. 2015 Jun;79:74-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Liuliu Du
Tadas Prasauskas
Virpi Leivo
Mari Turunen
Maria Pekkonen
Mihkel Kiviste
Anu Aaltonen
Dainius Martuzevicius
Ulla Haverinen-Shaughnessy
Source
Environ Int. 2015 Jun;79:74-84
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Formaldehyde - analysis
Housing - standards
Humans
Lithuania
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Ventilation - standards
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Abstract
Sixteen existing multi-family buildings (94 apartments) in Finland and 20 (96 apartments) in Lithuania were investigated prior to their renovation in order to develop and test out a common protocol for the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) assessment, and to assess the potential for improving IEQ along with energy efficiency. Baseline data on buildings, as well as data on temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radon, and microbial content in settled dust were collected from each apartment. In addition, questionnaire data regarding housing quality and health were collected from the occupants. The results indicated that most measured IEQ parameters were within recommended limits. However, different baselines in each country were observed especially for parameters related to thermal conditions and ventilation. Different baselines were also observed for the respondents' satisfaction with their residence and indoor air quality, as well as their behavior related to indoor environment. In this paper, we present some evidence for the potential in improving IEQ along with energy efficiency in the current building stock, followed by discussion of possible IEQ indicators and development of the assessment protocol.
PubMed ID
25797585 View in PubMed
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126 records – page 1 of 13.