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1264 records – page 1 of 127.

The 3-year follow-up study in a block of flats - experiences in the use of the Finnish indoor climate classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185305
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
M. Tuomainen
A. Tuomainen
J. Liesivuori
A-L Pasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, Finland. marja.tuomainen@hengitysliitto.fi
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air pollution, indoor
Allergens - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Asthma - prevention & control
Bacteria
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Construction Materials - standards
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Housing - standards
Humans
Humidity
Questionnaires
Spores, Fungal
Temperature
Abstract
Indoor climate of two new blocks of flats was investigated. The case building was built for people with respiratory diseases by following the instructions of the Finnish Classification of Indoor Climate, Construction and Finishing Materials, while the control building was built using conventional building technology. The main indoor air parameters (temperature, relative humidity and levels of CO, CO2, ammonia, total volatile organic compounds, total suspended particles, fungal spores, bacteria and cat, dog and house dust mite allergens) were measured in six apartments of both the buildings on five occasions during the 3-year occupancy. In addition, a questionnaire to evaluate symptoms of the occupants and their satisfaction with their home environment was conducted in connection with indoor air quality (IAQ) measurements. The levels of indoor air pollutants in the case building were, in general, lower than those in the control building. In addition, the asthmatic occupants informed that their symptoms had decreased during the occupancy in the case building. This case study showed that high IAQ is possible to reach by careful design, proper materials and equipment and on high-quality construction with reasonable additional costs. In addition, the study indicated that good IAQ can also be maintained during the occupancy, if sufficient information on factors affecting IAQ and guidance on proper use and care of equipment are available for occupants.
PubMed ID
12756007 View in PubMed
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13C evidence for dietary habits of prehistoric man in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62404
Source
Nature. 1981 Jul 23;292(5821):332-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-1981
Author
H. Tauber
Source
Nature. 1981 Jul 23;292(5821):332-3
Date
Jul-23-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone and Bones - analysis
Carbon Isotopes
Collagen - analysis
Denmark
Diet
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
PubMed ID
7019718 View in PubMed
Less detail

[13-year period of application of the 13C-urease breath test for determining Helicobacter pylori in Russian clinical practice].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262452
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2014;92(11):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
S I Rapoport
N A Shubina
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2014;92(11):59-64
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breath Tests - instrumentation - methods
Carbon Isotopes - diagnostic use
Child
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Family Health
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Helicobacter Infections - complications - diagnosis - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - physiology
Humans
Male
Medication Therapy Management
Predictive value of tests
Russia
Spectrum Analysis - methods
Abstract
13C-urease breath tests have been extensively used in world-wide gastroenterological practice since the 1990s. We have been using them since 2000, but their clinical application in Russia is far from being universal. Moreover, their results are significantly different from those obtained by other methods for determining H. pylori. The authors report original data on the peculiarities of occurrence of this pathogen in its carriers.
PubMed ID
25796949 View in PubMed
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15N in symbiotic fungi and plants estimates nitrogen and carbon flux rates in Arctic tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82286
Source
Ecology. 2006 Apr;87(4):816-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Hobbie John E
Hobbie Erik A
Author Affiliation
The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA. jhobbie@mbl.edu
Source
Ecology. 2006 Apr;87(4):816-22
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Carbon - metabolism
Fungi - metabolism
Nitrogen Isotopes - metabolism
Plants - metabolism
Abstract
When soil nitrogen is in short supply, most terrestrial plants form symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizae): hyphae take up soil nitrogen, transport it into plant roots, and receive plant sugars in return. In ecosystems, the transfers within the pathway fractionate nitrogen isotopes so that the natural abundance of 15N in fungi differs from that in their host plants by as much as 12% per hundred. Here we present a new method to quantify carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the symbiosis based on the fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from fungi to plant roots. We tested this method, which is based on the mass balance of 15N, with data from arctic Alaska where the nitrogen cycle is well studied. Mycorrhizal fungi provided 61-86% of the nitrogen in plants; plants provided 8-17% of their photosynthetic carbon to the fungi for growth and respiration. This method of analysis avoids the disturbance of the soil-microbe-root relationship caused by collecting samples, mixing the soil, or changing substrate concentrations. This analytical technique also can be applied to other nitrogen-limited ecosystems, such as many temperate and boreal forests, to quantify the importance for terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling of nutrient transfers mediated by mycorrhizae at the plant-soil interface.
PubMed ID
16676524 View in PubMed
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21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297387
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Freezing
Geography
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Global warming
Lakes - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
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A 300-million-year record of atmospheric carbon dioxide from fossil plant cuticles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95961
Source
Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):287-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2001
Author
Retallack G J
Author Affiliation
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene 97403-1272, USA. gregr@darkwing.uoregon.edu
Source
Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):287-90
Date
May-17-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmosphere - chemistry
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Cold Climate
Fossils
Ginkgo biloba - cytology - growth & development - metabolism
Greenhouse Effect
Ice
Methane - metabolism
Phylogeny
Plant Leaves - cytology - growth & development - metabolism
Plants, Medicinal
Pollen
Seasons
Water - metabolism
Abstract
To understand better the link between atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate over geological time, records of past CO2 are reconstructed from geochemical proxies. Although these records have provided us with a broad picture of CO2 variation throughout the Phanerozoic eon (the past 544 Myr), inconsistencies and gaps remain that still need to be resolved. Here I present a continuous 300-Myr record of stomatal abundance from fossil leaves of four genera of plants that are closely related to the present-day Ginkgo tree. Using the known relationship between leaf stomatal abundance and growing season CO2 concentrations, I reconstruct past atmospheric CO2 concentrations. For the past 300 Myr, only two intervals of low CO2 (2,000 p.p.m.v.) concentrations. These results are consistent with some reconstructions of past CO2 (refs 1, 2) and palaeotemperature records, but suggest that CO2 reconstructions based on carbon isotope proxies may be compromised by episodic outbursts of isotopically light methane. These results support the role of water vapour, methane and CO2 in greenhouse climate warming over the past 300 Myr.
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2001 May 17;411(6835):247-811357108
PubMed ID
11357126 View in PubMed
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Aalborg, Denmark: a role model for waste management practices to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98696
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):837-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009

[About the seven little devils who changed physiology. August and Marie Krogh on pulmonary gas exchange].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199676
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Dec 20;161(51):7112-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-1999

[Absorption kinetics of C14-GABA and its vitamin B conjugates in isolated bovine retina]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50806
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2001;47(4):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
Z A Rozanova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy named by Filatov, AMS of Ukraine, Odessa.
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2001;47(4):63-6
Date
2001
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Animals
Carbon Radioisotopes - metabolism
Cattle
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
English Abstract
Kinetics
Male
Retina - metabolism
Time Factors
Vitamin B Complex - chemistry - metabolism
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid - analogs & derivatives - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Absorption by the bovine retina of physiological concentration of PLP-GABA increase clearing 2-32 minutes of incubation in difference of GABA and its non metabolic preparations, which store up as much as possible in first minutes: picamilon > PLP-GABA > GABA > panthogam > biotinil-GABA. Kinetics of transport of GABA and its preparations into retina has a complex character. By the growth of concentration from 33 mM to 528 mM, it is linear for picamilion, showing diffusion, and not linear for GABA, PLP-GABA and panthogam, showing differently systems of its transport. And only GABA transport is activated by Na-ions.
PubMed ID
11571926 View in PubMed
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[Abundance and activity of microorganisms at the water-sediment interface and their effect on the carbon isotopic composition of suspended organic matter and sediments of the Kara Sea].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259299
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2013 Nov-Dec;82(6):723-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Ivanov
A Iu Lein
A S Savvichev
I I Rusanov
E F Veslopolova
E E Zakharova
T S Prusakova
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2013 Nov-Dec;82(6):723-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Carbon Isotopes - analysis - metabolism
Methanobacteriales - metabolism
Methanomicrobiales - metabolism
Oceans and Seas
Russia
Water Microbiology
Abstract
At ten stations of the meridian profile in the eastern Kara Sea from the Yenisei estuary through the shallow shelf and further through the St. Anna trough, total microbial numbers (TMN) determined by direct counting, total activity of the microbial community determined by dark CO2 assimilation (DCA), and the carbon isotopic composition of organic matter in suspension and upper sediment horizons (d13C, per thousand) were investigated. Three horizons were studied in detail: (1) the near-bottom water layer (20-30 cm above the sediment); (2) the uppermost, strongly hydrated sediment horizon, further termed warp (5-10 mm); and (3) the upper sediment horizon (1-5 cm). Due to decrease in the amount of isotopically light carbon of terrigenous origin with increasing distance from the Yenisei estuary, the TMN and DCA values decreased, and the d13C changed gradually from -29.7 to -23.9 per thousand. At most stations, a noticeable decrease in TMN and DCA values with depth was observed in the water column, while the carbon isotopic composition of suspended organic matter did not change significantly. Considerable changes of all parameters were detected in the interface zone: TMN and DCA increased in the sediments compared to their values in near-bottom water, while the 13C content increased significantly, with d13C of organic matter in the sediments being at some stations 3.5- 4.0 per thousand higher than in the near-bottom water. Due to insufficient illumination in the near-bottom zone, newly formed isotopically heavy organic matter (d13C(-) -20 per thousand) could not be formed by photosynthesis, active growth of chemoautotrophic microorganisms in this zone is suggested, which may use reduced sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon compounds diffusing from anaerobic sediments. High DCA values for the interface zone samples confirm this hypothesis. Moreover, neutrophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were retrieved from the samples of this zone.
PubMed ID
25509411 View in PubMed
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1264 records – page 1 of 127.