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670 records – page 1 of 67.

A 1-year randomized study to evaluate the effects of a dose reduction in oral contraceptives on lipids and carbohydrate metabolism: 20 microg ethinyl estradiol combined with 100 microg levonorgestrel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176202
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Sven O Skouby
Jan Endrikat
Bernd Düsterberg
Werner Schmidt
Christoph Gerlinger
Jens Wessel
Henri Goldstein
Joergen Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, DK 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. sven.skouby@fh.hosp.dk
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
C-Peptide - blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism - drug effects
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Contraceptive Agents, Female - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethinyl Estradiol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Levonorgestrel - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
To evaluate the impact on lipid and carbohydrate variables of a combined one-third ethinyl estradiol (EE)/levonorgestrel (LNG) dose reduction in oral contraceptives.
In an open-label, randomized study, a dose-reduced oral contraceptive containing 20 microg EE and 100 microg LNG (20 EE/100 LNG) was compared with a reference preparation containing 30 microg EE and 150 microg LNG (30 EE/150 LNG). One-year data from 48 volunteers were obtained.
We found a decrease of HDL2 cholesterol and increases of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total triglycerides in both treatment groups from baseline to the 13th treatment cycle. Although for four of six variables, the changes in the 20 EE group were lower compared with the 30 EE group, none of the differences between the two treatments were statistically significant. The median values for the fasting levels of insulin, C-peptide and free fatty acids slightly increased or remained unchanged while the fasting glucose levels slightly decreased after 13 treatment cycles. While the glucose area under the curve (AUC) (0-3 h) was similar in both groups during the OGTT, the insulin AUC(0-3 h) was less increased in the 20 EE/100 LNG group compared with the 30 EE/150 LNG group. None of the differences between the treatment groups for any of the carbohydrate metabolism variables were statistically significant at any time point. Both study treatments were safe and well tolerated by the volunteers.
Similar effects on the lipid and carbohydrate profiles were found for both preparations. The balanced one-third EE dose reduction in this new oral contraceptive caused slightly lower, but insignificant, changes in the lipid and carbohydrate variables compared with the reference treatment.
PubMed ID
15707560 View in PubMed
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44-year dental health survey of Helsinki schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246141
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1980 Feb;8(1):66-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1980
Author
I. Rytömaa
V. Järvinen
P E Calonius
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1980 Feb;8(1):66-7
Date
Feb-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Dental Health Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Sucrose - administration & dosage
War
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to establish whether the number of intact teeth in Helsinki schoolchildren aged 7-13 years was rationally correlated with the wartime reduction in sugar consumption and, later, with dental health education programs in Finland. The period covered is 44 years. The results show that dental health education is effective in caries prevention and that enforced programs can lead to an improvement similar to that seen during the war.
PubMed ID
6929245 View in PubMed
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Abnormal glycosylation and altered Golgi structure in colorectal cancer: dependence on intra-Golgi pH.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19175
Source
FEBS Lett. 2002 Apr 10;516(1-3):217-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2002
Author
Sakari Kellokumpu
Raija Sormunen
Ilmo Kellokumpu
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014, Oulu, Finland. sakari.kellokumpu@oulu.fi
Source
FEBS Lett. 2002 Apr 10;516(1-3):217-24
Date
Apr-10-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, Tumor-Associated, Carbohydrate - metabolism
Breast Neoplasms - immunology - metabolism - ultrastructure
COS Cells
Cells, Cultured
Colorectal Neoplasms - immunology - metabolism - ultrastructure
Female
Glycosylation
Golgi Apparatus - immunology - metabolism - ultrastructure
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Ion Transport
Microscopy, Electron
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
Abnormal glycosylation of cellular glycoconjugates is a common phenotypic change in many human tumors. Here, we explore the possibility that an altered Golgi pH may also be responsible for these cancer-associated glycosylation abnormalities. We show that a mere dissipation of the acidic Golgi pH results both in increased expression of some cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens and in structural disorganization of the Golgi apparatus in otherwise normally glycosylating cells. pH dependence of these alterations was confirmed by showing that an acidification-defective breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) also displayed a fragmented Golgi apparatus, whereas the Golgi apparatus was structurally normal in its acidification-competent subline (MCF-7/AdrR). Acidification competence was also found to rescue normal glycosylation potential in MCF-7/AdrR cells. Finally, we show that abnormal glycosylation is also accompanied by similar structural disorganization and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus in colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that an inappropriate Golgi pH may indeed be responsible for the abnormal Golgi structure and lowered glycosylation potential of the Golgi apparatus in malignant cells.
PubMed ID
11959136 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal Eskimo diet in modern perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature694
Source
American Anthropologist. 79:309-316.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
Draper, H.H.
Author Affiliation
University of Guelph
Source
American Anthropologist. 79:309-316.
Date
1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Point Hope
Wainwright
Nunapitchuk
Diet, traditional
Nutrition
Dietary Carbohydrates
Dietary protein
Acculturation
Lactose tolerance
Sucrose tolerance
Cholesterol
Blood pressure
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1122.
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The acid potentiality of carbohydrates. An investigation of some common dietary components in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62725
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1961 Dec;19:355-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1961
Author
T. MORCHI
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1961 Dec;19:355-85
Date
Dec-1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbohydrates - chemistry
Dental Caries - chemistry
Saliva - chemistry
Tooth - chemistry
PubMed ID
14475829 View in PubMed
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Activity of disaccharidases in arctic populations: evolutionary aspects disaccharidases in arctic populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4724
Source
J Physiol Anthropol Appl Human Sci. 2005 Jul;24(4):473-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Andrew Kozlov
Galina Vershubsky
Svetlana Borinskaya
Maria Sokolova
Vladislav Nuvano
Author Affiliation
Institute of Developmental Physiology, Russian Academy of Education, Moscow, Russia. aikozlov@narod.ru
Source
J Physiol Anthropol Appl Human Sci. 2005 Jul;24(4):473-6
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Age Factors
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Blood glucose
Carbohydrate Metabolism, Inborn Errors - enzymology - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Diet
Disaccharidases - deficiency - metabolism
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Evolution
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Disorders of dietary sugar assimilation occur more often among native people of the Arctic then in temperate climate inhabitants.It is hypothesized that the limited variety of natural exogenous sugars in the Arctic, and their low content in the traditional diets of native northerners in accordance with a "protein-lipid" type of metabolism weakened selection, favoring diversity of disaccharidase enzymes.
PubMed ID
16079601 View in PubMed
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[Adequacy of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools of northern Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143615
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joel Monárrez-Espino
Graciela Ivette Béjar-Lío
Guillermo Vázquez-Mendoza
Author Affiliation
Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Clínica, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Chihuahua, México.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Fats - analysis
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Menu Planning
Mexico
Micronutrients - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Residential Facilities
Schools
Abstract
To assess the adequacy and variability of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools.
Records of food and drinks served for meals, weighed daily, were obtained from Monday through Friday for 10 consecutive weeks in two selected boarding schools. Nutrient intake for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays was calculated and analyzed for weeks 3, 5 and 7.
The number of food items used per week ranged from 33 to 46. The most frequently utilized items were cooking oil, fortified corn tortilla, milk, onion, sugar and beans. Total energy served per day fluctuated between 1309 and 2919 Kcal; proteins comprised 10.5 to 21.2% (45 to 127 g/day), carbohydrates 40.7 to 61.9% (145 to 433 g/day), and lipids 22.5 to 48.1% (45 to 125 g/day) of the total. Daily micronutrient content ranges were: iron 15-33 mg, calcium 686-1795 mg, zinc 8-19 mg, vitamin A 118-756 mcg, vitamin B(9) 42-212 mcg, and vitamin B(12) 0.8-5 mcg.
There was significant daily variability in the diet, which was hypercaloric due to the high lipid content, and yet insufficient in vitamins B(9), B(12) and A.
PubMed ID
20464250 View in PubMed
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Adherence to dietary recommendations for Swedish adults across categories of greenhouse gas emissions from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293496
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Camilla Sjörs
Fredrik Hedenus
Arvid Sjölander
Annika Tillander
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
1Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB),Karolinska Institutet,Nobels väg 12a,SE-171 77 Stockholm,Sweden.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec; 20(18):3381-3393
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Exercise
Female
Greenhouse Gases - analysis
Humans
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Recommended dietary allowances
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore associations between diet-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE), nutrient intakes and adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations among Swedish adults.
Diet was assessed by 4d food records in the Swedish National Dietary Survey. GHGE was estimated by linking all foods to carbon dioxide equivalents, using data from life cycle assessment studies. Participants were categorized into quartiles of energy-adjusted GHGE and differences between GHGE groups regarding nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations were explored.
Sweden.
Women (n 840) and men (n 627) aged 18-80 years.
Differences in nutrient intakes and adherence to nutrient recommendations between GHGE groups were generally small. The dietary intake of participants with the lowest emissions was more in line with recommendations regarding protein, carbohydrates, dietary fibre and vitamin D, but further from recommendations regarding added sugar, compared with the highest GHGE group. The overall adherence to recommendations was found to be better among participants with lower emissions compared with higher emissions. Among women, 27 % in the lowest GHGE group adhered to at least twenty-three recommendations compared with only 12 % in the highest emission group. For men, the corresponding figures were 17 and 10 %, respectively.
The study compared nutrient intakes as well as adherence to dietary recommendations for diets with different levels of GHGE from a national dietary survey. We found that participants with low-emission diets, despite higher intake of added sugar, adhered to a larger number of dietary recommendations than those with high emissions.
PubMed ID
28879831 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the enhanced recovery after surgery protocol and outcomes after colorectal cancer surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137832
Source
Arch Surg. 2011 May;146(5):571-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Ulf O Gustafsson
Jonatan Hausel
Anders Thorell
Olle Ljungqvist
Mattias Soop
Jonas Nygren
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Ersta Hospital, 116 91 Stockholm, Sweden. ulf.gustafsson@erstadiakoni.se
Source
Arch Surg. 2011 May;146(5):571-7
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Beverages
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - rehabilitation - surgery
Critical Pathways - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Early Ambulation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fluid Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Laparoscopy - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Perioperative Care - statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
To study the impact of different adherence levels to the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol and the effect of various ERAS elements on outcomes following major surgery.
Single-center prospective cohort study before and after reinforcement of an ERAS protocol. Comparisons were made both between and across periods using multivariate logistic regression. All clinical data (114 variables) were prospectively recorded.
Ersta Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Nine hundred fifty-three consecutive patients with colorectal cancer: 464 patients treated in 2002 to 2004 and 489 in 2005 to 2007.
The association between improved adherence to the ERAS protocol and the incidence of postoperative symptoms, complications, and length of stay following major colorectal cancer surgery was analyzed.
Following an overall increase in preoperative and perioperative adherence to the ERAS protocol from 43.3% in 2002 to 2004 to 70.6% in 2005 to 2007, both postoperative complications (odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.98) and symptoms (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.70) declined significantly. Restriction of intravenous fluid and use of a preoperative carbohydrate drink were major independent predictors. Across periods, the proportion of adverse postoperative outcomes (30-day morbidity, symptoms, and readmissions) was significantly reduced with increasing adherence to the ERAS protocol (>70%, >80%, and >90%) compared with low ERAS adherence (
Notes
Comment In: Arch Surg. 2011 May;146(5):577-821739654
PubMed ID
21242424 View in PubMed
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670 records – page 1 of 67.