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121 records – page 1 of 13.

A 1-year randomized study to evaluate the effects of a dose reduction in oral contraceptives on lipids and carbohydrate metabolism: 20 microg ethinyl estradiol combined with 100 microg levonorgestrel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176202
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Sven O Skouby
Jan Endrikat
Bernd Düsterberg
Werner Schmidt
Christoph Gerlinger
Jens Wessel
Henri Goldstein
Joergen Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, DK 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. sven.skouby@fh.hosp.dk
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
C-Peptide - blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism - drug effects
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Contraceptive Agents, Female - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethinyl Estradiol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Levonorgestrel - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
To evaluate the impact on lipid and carbohydrate variables of a combined one-third ethinyl estradiol (EE)/levonorgestrel (LNG) dose reduction in oral contraceptives.
In an open-label, randomized study, a dose-reduced oral contraceptive containing 20 microg EE and 100 microg LNG (20 EE/100 LNG) was compared with a reference preparation containing 30 microg EE and 150 microg LNG (30 EE/150 LNG). One-year data from 48 volunteers were obtained.
We found a decrease of HDL2 cholesterol and increases of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total triglycerides in both treatment groups from baseline to the 13th treatment cycle. Although for four of six variables, the changes in the 20 EE group were lower compared with the 30 EE group, none of the differences between the two treatments were statistically significant. The median values for the fasting levels of insulin, C-peptide and free fatty acids slightly increased or remained unchanged while the fasting glucose levels slightly decreased after 13 treatment cycles. While the glucose area under the curve (AUC) (0-3 h) was similar in both groups during the OGTT, the insulin AUC(0-3 h) was less increased in the 20 EE/100 LNG group compared with the 30 EE/150 LNG group. None of the differences between the treatment groups for any of the carbohydrate metabolism variables were statistically significant at any time point. Both study treatments were safe and well tolerated by the volunteers.
Similar effects on the lipid and carbohydrate profiles were found for both preparations. The balanced one-third EE dose reduction in this new oral contraceptive caused slightly lower, but insignificant, changes in the lipid and carbohydrate variables compared with the reference treatment.
PubMed ID
15707560 View in PubMed
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Abnormal glycosylation and altered Golgi structure in colorectal cancer: dependence on intra-Golgi pH.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19175
Source
FEBS Lett. 2002 Apr 10;516(1-3):217-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2002
Author
Sakari Kellokumpu
Raija Sormunen
Ilmo Kellokumpu
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014, Oulu, Finland. sakari.kellokumpu@oulu.fi
Source
FEBS Lett. 2002 Apr 10;516(1-3):217-24
Date
Apr-10-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, Tumor-Associated, Carbohydrate - metabolism
Breast Neoplasms - immunology - metabolism - ultrastructure
COS Cells
Cells, Cultured
Colorectal Neoplasms - immunology - metabolism - ultrastructure
Female
Glycosylation
Golgi Apparatus - immunology - metabolism - ultrastructure
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Ion Transport
Microscopy, Electron
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
Abnormal glycosylation of cellular glycoconjugates is a common phenotypic change in many human tumors. Here, we explore the possibility that an altered Golgi pH may also be responsible for these cancer-associated glycosylation abnormalities. We show that a mere dissipation of the acidic Golgi pH results both in increased expression of some cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens and in structural disorganization of the Golgi apparatus in otherwise normally glycosylating cells. pH dependence of these alterations was confirmed by showing that an acidification-defective breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) also displayed a fragmented Golgi apparatus, whereas the Golgi apparatus was structurally normal in its acidification-competent subline (MCF-7/AdrR). Acidification competence was also found to rescue normal glycosylation potential in MCF-7/AdrR cells. Finally, we show that abnormal glycosylation is also accompanied by similar structural disorganization and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus in colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that an inappropriate Golgi pH may indeed be responsible for the abnormal Golgi structure and lowered glycosylation potential of the Golgi apparatus in malignant cells.
PubMed ID
11959136 View in PubMed
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Activity of disaccharidases in arctic populations: evolutionary aspects disaccharidases in arctic populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4724
Source
J Physiol Anthropol Appl Human Sci. 2005 Jul;24(4):473-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Andrew Kozlov
Galina Vershubsky
Svetlana Borinskaya
Maria Sokolova
Vladislav Nuvano
Author Affiliation
Institute of Developmental Physiology, Russian Academy of Education, Moscow, Russia. aikozlov@narod.ru
Source
J Physiol Anthropol Appl Human Sci. 2005 Jul;24(4):473-6
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Age Factors
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Blood glucose
Carbohydrate Metabolism, Inborn Errors - enzymology - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Diet
Disaccharidases - deficiency - metabolism
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Evolution
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Disorders of dietary sugar assimilation occur more often among native people of the Arctic then in temperate climate inhabitants.It is hypothesized that the limited variety of natural exogenous sugars in the Arctic, and their low content in the traditional diets of native northerners in accordance with a "protein-lipid" type of metabolism weakened selection, favoring diversity of disaccharidase enzymes.
PubMed ID
16079601 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the quality of primary therapeutic-preventive care rendered to patients with type I diabetes mellitus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218247
Source
Probl Endokrinol (Mosk). 1994 May-Jun;40(3):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
M B Antsiferov
E G Starostina
G R Galstian
I I Dedov
Source
Probl Endokrinol (Mosk). 1994 May-Jun;40(3):19-22
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities - standards
Carbohydrate Metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - therapy
Diabetic Ketoacidosis - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Patient compliance
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
A prospective follow-up of a random sample of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus revealed a marked decompensation of carbohydrate metabolism in 98% of the examinees, a high incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis, a long duration of temporary invalidity, and poor adherence of patients to medical recommendations. Assessment of primary health care rendered to patients with type I diabetes at district outpatient clinics of Moscow demonstrated its poor efficacy and a necessity to improve the level of specialized diabetologic care.
PubMed ID
8072994 View in PubMed
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Associations between oral sugar clearance, dental caries, and related factors among 71-year-olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92055
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2008;66(6):358-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Alstad Torgny
Holmberg Ingvar
Osterberg Tor
Birkhed Dowen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, Faculty of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. torgny.alstad@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2008;66(6):358-67
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Colony Count, Microbial
DMF Index
Dental Caries - metabolism
Dietary Carbohydrates - metabolism
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Glucose - metabolism
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mastication - physiology
Mouth - metabolism - microbiology
Oral Health
Range of Motion, Articular
Reference Values
Saliva - metabolism
Salivation - physiology
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification - metabolism
Temporomandibular Joint - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations between oral sugar clearance and the prevalence of dental decay. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 92 (44 F, 48 M) 71-year-old subjects in Goteborg, Sweden were consecutively chosen from a representative cohort study. The subjects were examined for: 1) caries-related status, 2) oral function, 3) salivary conditions, 4) cariogenic micro-organisms, and 5) oral sugar clearance. A factor analysis was used to investigate the possible existence of latent variables within these five areas. The latent variables from the factor analyses were used to study the associations between clearance and caries in multivariate regression models. RESULTS: Only one latent variable relating to oral sugar clearance was found. In the regression model with the latent variable related to oral sugar clearance as a dependent variable and gender plus the latent variables related to oral function and salivary conditions as an independent variable, there were associations with gender and some latent variables reflecting oral function and one reflecting glucose in saliva (R(2)=0.20/0.17). Three latent variables relating to caries-related status were found and these were associated with the number of teeth, the percentage of filled tooth surfaces, and the percentage of decayed tooth surfaces (DS%). In the regression analysis using the latent variable associated with DS% as a dependent variable, this variable was related to the latent variables of oral sugar clearance and to some reflecting oral function, as well as glucose in saliva (R(2)=0.28). CONCLUSIONS: Oral sugar clearance appears to be independently associated with the prevalence of dental caries in the elderly.
PubMed ID
18787980 View in PubMed
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Biomarkers of Individual Foods, and Separation of Diets Using Untargeted LC-MS-based Plasma Metabolomics in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300058
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 01; 63(1):e1800215
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
Evrim Acar
Gözde Gürdeniz
Bekzod Khakimov
Francesco Savorani
Sanne Kellebjerg Korndal
Thomas Meinert Larsen
Søren Balling Engelsen
Arne Astrup
Lars O Dragsted
Author Affiliation
Simula Metropolitan Center for Digital Engineering, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 01; 63(1):e1800215
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biomarkers - blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Diet
Eating
Fasting
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Metabolomics - methods
Middle Aged
Norway
Phospholipids - blood - chemistry
Abstract
Self-reported dietary intake does not represent an objective unbiased assessment. The effect of the new Nordic diet (NND) versus average Danish diet (ADD) on plasma metabolic profiles is investigated to identify biomarkers of compliance and metabolic effects.
In a 26-week controlled dietary intervention study, 146 subjects followed either NND, a predominantly organic diet high in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and fish, or ADD, a diet higher in imported and processed foods. Fasting plasma samples are analyzed with untargeted ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadruple time-of-flight. It is demonstrated that supervised machine learning with feature selection can separate NND and ADD samples with an average test set performance of up to 0.88 area under the curve. The NND plasma metabolome is characterized by diet-related metabolites, such as pipecolic acid betaine (whole grain), trimethylamine oxide, and prolyl hydroxyproline (both fish intake), while theobromine (chocolate) and proline betaine (citrus) were associated with ADD. Amino acid (i.e., indolelactic acid and hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate) and fat metabolism (butyryl carnitine) characterize ADD whereas NND is associated with higher concentrations of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines.
The plasma metabolite profiles are predictive of dietary patterns and reflected good compliance while indicating effects of potential health benefit, including changes in fat metabolism and glucose utilization.
PubMed ID
30094970 View in PubMed
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121 records – page 1 of 13.