Skip header and navigation

Refine By

60 records – page 1 of 6.

The adaptation and implementation of a community-based participatory research curriculum to build tribal research capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265381
Source
Am J Public Health. 2015 Jul;105 Suppl 3:S424-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Valarie Blue Bird Jernigan
Tvli Jacob
Dennis Styne
Source
Am J Public Health. 2015 Jul;105 Suppl 3:S424-32
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capacity building
Community-Based Participatory Research
Curriculum
Education, Professional - organization & administration
Focus Groups
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
United States
Abstract
We studied community-based participatory research in American Indian/Alaska Native communities. We have presented a case study describing a community-clinic-academic partnership with the goal of building tribal capacity and infrastructure to conduct health disparities research. The 2-year intensive training was guided by the framework of an evidence- and community-based participatory research curriculum, adapted and implemented with practice-based data collection activities and seminars to address issues specific to community-based participatory research with sovereign tribal nations. The initiative highlighted important challenges and opportunities in transdisciplinary partnerships; identified gaps in conducting health disparities research at the tribal, clinical, and university levels; and led to important policy change initiatives in all the partner settings.
Notes
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1988 Apr;15(4):684-903260954
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1989;2(3):7-172490286
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):755S-759S10195598
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Jan;105(1):131-815635359
Cites: Cancer Control. 2005 Nov;12 Suppl 2:70-616327753
Cites: Cancer Control. 2006 Jul;13(3):230-616885920
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2006 Jul;7(3):312-2316760238
Cites: J Urban Health. 2006 Nov;83(6):989-100317082993
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Jan 24;297(4):407-1017244838
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Jan;98(1):22-718048800
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S71-619246668
Cites: MMWR Recomm Rep. 2009 Jul 24;58(RR-7):1-2619629029
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr;100(4):677-8320220114
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Jul 15;363(3):204-720538622
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2010 Nov;11(6):888-9919376928
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2011 Mar;12(2):261-7020534807
Cites: Clin Transl Sci. 2010 Oct;3(5):233-821500397
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2011 Sep;37(5):333-821854275
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2012 Aug;27(4):645-5521994709
Cites: Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2012 Fall;6(3):289-9922982842
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2013 Jul;14(4):524-3323091303
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2013 Dec;103(12):2185-9223678897
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2013 Dec;103(12):2146-5224134372
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2013 Dec;103(12):2160-424134381
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S263-724754649
Cites: Prev Med. 2014 Oct;67 Suppl 1:S51-724513172
Cites: Sci Eng Ethics. 2006 Jul;12(3):491-50716909151
Cites: West J Nurs Res. 2001 Mar;23(2):126-4711272853
Cites: J Nurs Scholarsh. 2001;33(3):253-811552552
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 2002 Jan-Feb;19(1):47-5811841682
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Apr;92(4):520-411919043
Cites: Prev Sci. 2002 Sep;3(3):235-4012387557
Cites: Health Care Women Int. 2003 Sep-Oct;24(8):674-9612959868
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2003 Dec;32(3-4):207-1614703257
PubMed ID
25905848 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing the burden of post-conflict surgical disease - strategies from the North Caucasus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135930
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(6):669-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karsten Lunze
Fatima I Lunze
Author Affiliation
Preventive Medicine, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. karsten.lunze@post.harvard.edu
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(6):669-77
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Blast Injuries - complications - psychology - surgery
Capacity Building - methods
Child
Disaster Planning - methods - standards
Ear, Middle - injuries - surgery
Explosions
General Surgery - manpower
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
International Cooperation
Needs Assessment
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prisoners - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Schools
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Terrorism
War
Abstract
The 2004 terror attack on a school in Beslan, North Caucasus, with more than 1300 children and their families taken hostage and 334 people killed, ended after extreme violence. Following the disaster, many survivors with blast ear injuries developed complications because no microsurgery services were available in the region. Here, we present our strategies in North Ossetia to strengthen subspecialty surgical care in a region of instable security conditions. Disaster modifies disease burden in an environment of conflict-related health-care limitations. We built on available secondary care and partnered international with local stakeholders to reach and treat victims of a humanitarian disaster. A strategy of mutual commitment resulted in treatment of all consenting Beslan victims with blast trauma sequelae and of non disaster-related patients. Credible, sustained partnerships and needs assessments beyond the immediate phases after a disaster are essential to facilitate a meaningful transition from humanitarian aid to capacity building exceeding existing insufficient standards. Psychosocial impacts of disaster might constitute a barrier to care and need to be assessed when responding to the burden of surgical disease in conflict or post-conflict settings. Involving local citizen groups in the planning process can be useful to identify and access vulnerable populations. Integration of our strategy into broader efforts might strengthen the local health system through management and leadership.
PubMed ID
21432701 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternative level of care: Canada's hospital beds, the evidence and options.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107861
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 Aug;9(1):26-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Jason M Sutherland
R Trafford Crump
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 Aug;9(1):26-34
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Capacity building
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Humans
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Reimbursement, Incentive - organization & administration
Residential Facilities - supply & distribution
Abstract
Patients designated as alternative level of care (ALC) are an ongoing concern for healthcare policy makers across Canada. These patients occupy valuable hospital beds and limit access to acute care services. The objective of this paper is to present policy alternatives to address underlying factors associated with ALC bed use. Three alternatives, and their respective limitations and structural challenges, are discussed. Potential solutions may require a mix of policy options proposed here. Inadequate policy jeopardizes new acute care activity-based funding schemes in British Columbia and Ontario. Failure to address this issue could exacerbate pressures on the existing bottlenecks in the community care system in these and other provinces.
Notes
Cites: Healthc Pap. 2000 Spring;1(2):13-3512811063
Cites: CMAJ. 2004 May 25;170(11):1678-8615159366
Cites: Healthc Pap. 2004;5(1):34-9; discussion 96-915496813
Cites: J Aging Soc Policy. 2004;16(4):17-3815724571
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2006 Apr;61(4):367-7316611703
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2007 Oct;2(Pt 4):419-2718634642
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2009 Aug;44(4):1188-21019490159
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Apr 6;182(6):53520194558
Cites: BMJ. 2011;342:d90521444642
Cites: Gerontologist. 2011 Dec;51(6):774-8521737398
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2012 Jan;7(1):73-10122221929
PubMed ID
23968671 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arctic Council Second Ministerial Meeting, Barrow, Alaska, October 10-13, 2000

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100818
Source
Documents from the Second Ministerial Meeting in Barrow, Alaska
Date
2000
  1 document  
Source
Documents from the Second Ministerial Meeting in Barrow, Alaska
Date
2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
ACAP
ACIA
AMAP
Arctic Telemedicine Project
Barrow Declaration
CAFF
Capacity building
Children and youth health indicators
Climate change
EPPR
Heavy metals
Marine pollution
PAME
PCB
POPs
Sustainable Development Working Group (SDWG)
Tourism
Documents

ArcticCouncilBarrow2000.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail
Source
Glob Health Action. 2016;9:32016
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016

Blended learning across universities in a South-North-South collaboration: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281893
Source
Health Res Policy Syst. 2016 Sep 02;14(1):67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-02-2016
Author
Myroslava Protsiv
Senia Rosales-Klintz
Freddie Bwanga
Merrick Zwarenstein
Salla Atkins
Source
Health Res Policy Syst. 2016 Sep 02;14(1):67
Date
Sep-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Capacity building
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
European Union
Humans
Income
International Cooperation
Internet
Learning
Models, Educational
Research - education
Research Personnel
Students
Sweden
Teaching
Uganda
Universities
Abstract
Increased health research capacity is needed in low- and middle-income countries to respond to local health challenges. Technology-aided teaching approaches, such as blended learning (BL), can stimulate international education collaborations and connect skilled scientists who can jointly contribute to the efforts to address local shortages of high-level research capacity. The African Regional Capacity Development for Health Systems and Services Research (ARCADE HSSR) was a European Union-funded project implemented from 2011 to 2015. The project consortium partners worked together to expand access to research training and to build the research capacity of post-graduate students. This paper presents a case study of the first course in the project, which focused on a meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy studies and was delivered in 2013 through collaboration by universities in Uganda, Sweden and South Africa.
We conducted a mixed-methods case study involving student course evaluations, participant observation, interviews with teaching faculty and student feedback collected through group discussion. Quantitative data were analysed using frequencies, and qualitative data using thematic analysis.
A traditional face-to-face course was adapted for BL using a mixture of online resources and materials, synchronous online interaction between students and teachers across different countries complemented by face-to-face meetings, and in-class interaction between students and tutors. Synchronous online discussions led by Makerere University were the central learning technique in the course. The learners appreciated the BL design and reported that they were highly motivated and actively engaged throughout the course. The teams implementing the course were small, with individual faculty members and staff members carrying out many extra responsibilities; yet, some necessary competencies for course design were not available.
BL is a feasible approach to simultaneously draw globally available skills into cross-national, high-level skills training in multiple countries. This method can overcome access barriers to research methods courses and can offer engaging formats and personalised learning experiences. BL enables teaching and learning from experts and peers across the globe with minimal disruption to students' daily schedules. Transforming a face-to-face course into a blended course that fulfils its full potential requires concerted effort and dedicated technological and pedagogical support.
Notes
Cites: Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2011 Jun;25(2):385-9821628053
Cites: Stud Health Technol Inform. 2012;180:1153-522874384
Cites: PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2011 Oct;5(10):e135122022630
Cites: Acad Med. 1998 Mar;73(3):318-239526459
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2009 Jan-Feb;15(1):59-6619077596
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2014 Mar 11;14:4724612923
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2016 Jan 04;18(1):e226729058
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2012 May;32(4):464-821645947
Cites: Hum Resour Health. 2013 Dec 23;11:6824365482
Cites: BMC Int Health Hum Rights. 2011 Mar 09;11 Suppl 1:S221411002
Cites: Med Teach. 2012;34(1):e58-6322250696
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2008 Jul-Aug;14(4):E10-618552638
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2011 Winter;31(1):64-921425362
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2015 Feb 28;15:2725884508
Cites: Hum Resour Health. 2013 Feb 04;11:423379467
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2014 Oct;29(7):831-4124038107
Cites: Med Teach. 2008 Feb;30(1):25-3318278648
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2008 Nov;28(8):943-5218599162
Cites: Acta Trop. 2009 Nov;112 Suppl 1:S8-S1519695211
Cites: Nurs Clin North Am. 2008 Dec;43(4):557-66, vi18940412
Cites: Health Informatics J. 2013 Jun;19(2):101-1523715210
Cites: Nurse Educ. 2005 Sep-Oct;30(5):221-516170265
Cites: Health Res Policy Syst. 2014 Jun 02;12:2224888353
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Jan;43(1):99-10516326165
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: Med Teach. 2009 Apr;31(4):e169-7619288308
Cites: PLoS Med. 2015 Feb 03;12(2):e100178425646629
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2012 Jul;32(5):e14-822071277
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Feb 09;11(2):e014888226859832
PubMed ID
27589996 View in PubMed
Less detail

Building capacity for community-based participatory research for health disparities in Canada: the case of "Partnerships in Community Health Research".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139495
Source
Health Promot Pract. 2011 Mar;12(2):280-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Jeffrey R Masuda
Genevieve Creighton
Sean Nixon
James Frankish
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Geography, Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. jeff.masuda@cnehse.ca
Source
Health Promot Pract. 2011 Mar;12(2):280-92
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Canada
Capacity Building - organization & administration
Community-Based Participatory Research - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Professional Competence
Program Development
Universities - organization & administration
Abstract
Enthusiasm for community-based participatory research (CBPR) is increasing among health researchers and practitioners in addressing health disparities. Although there are many benefits of CBPR, such as its ability to democratize knowledge and link research to community action and social change, there are also perils that researchers can encounter that can threaten the integrity of the research and undermine relationships. Despite the increasing demand for CBPR-qualified individuals, few programs exist that are capable of facilitating in-depth and experiential training for both students and those working in communities. This article reviews the Partnerships in Community Health Research (PCHR), a training program at the University of British Columbia that between 2001 and 2009 has equipped graduate student and community-based learners with knowledge, skills, and experience to engage together more effectively using CBPR. With case studies of PCHR learner projects, this article illustrates some of the important successes and lessons learned in preparing CBPR-qualified researchers and community-based professionals in Canada.
PubMed ID
21057046 View in PubMed
Less detail

Building capacity for dementia care: training program to develop primary care memory clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132982
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jul;57(7):e249-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Linda Lee
M Janet Kasperski
W Wayne Weston
Author Affiliation
The Centre for Family Medicine, 10 B Victoria St S, Kitchener, ON N2G 1C5. joelinda5@rogers.com
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jul;57(7):e249-52
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capacity building
Dementia - therapy
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Ontario
Physicians, Family
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Program Development
Abstract
Currently, dementia care provided by family physicians is suboptimal and access to specialist resources is limited. With the aging population, there is a need for system-wide, programmatic interventions to improve the diagnosis and management of patients with memory difficulties. The development of primary care memory clinics addresses this need.
The Memory Clinic Training Program aims to develop highly functioning interprofessional memory clinics that assist family physicians in providing improved care for patients with dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment.
The interprofessional training program consists of a 2-day case-based workshop, 1 day of observership and clinical training at the Centre for Family Medicine Memory Clinic, and 2 days of on-site mentorship at each newly formed memory clinic.
The Memory Clinic Training Program is an accredited, comprehensive program designed to assist family practice groups with developing primary care memory clinics. These clinics aim to transform the current limited practice capability of individual family physicians into a systematic, comprehensive, interprofessional health care service that improves capacity and quality of primary care for patients with cognitive impairment and dementia.
Notes
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004 Jul;52(7):1051-915209641
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004 Feb;52(2):187-9414728626
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1990 Aug;147(8):1049-512375439
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Nov 15;153(10):1423-317585368
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Dec 4;276(21):1725-318940320
Cites: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 1997 Jun;11(2):99-1069194956
Cites: Gerontologist. 1999 Aug;39(4):457-6410495584
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Apr;3(2):A3416539775
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Mar 25;332(7543):692-616565124
Cites: JAMA. 2006 May 10;295(18):2148-5716684985
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2006 Sep;52(9):1108-917279222
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Mar 25;178(7):825-3618362376
Cites: Intern Med J. 2008 Jun;38(6):427-3718298554
Cites: Alzheimers Dement. 2009 Jan;5(1):30-4219118807
Cites: Alzheimers Dement. 2009 May;5(3):215-2619362885
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2009 May;55(5):506-7.e1-519439707
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2009 May;55(5):508-9.e1-719439708
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Jan 21;362(3):e720054034
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Dec;57(12):2209-1619943831
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2010 Feb;14(2):105-620126957
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2010 Mar;60(572):193-820202364
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010 Nov;58(11):2197-20420977435
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2010 Fall;30(4):237-4521171029
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Oct 23;160(19):2964-811041904
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2000 Nov;48(11):1430-411083319
Cites: J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2001 Winter;14(4):188-9811794447
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2002 Spring;22(2):69-7612099122
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Sep 4;288(9):1057-6012204068
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 May;51(5):657-6412752841
Cites: J R Soc Med. 2003 Jul;96(7):320-412835442
Cites: Gerontologist. 2004 Aug;44(4):548-5315331812
PubMed ID
21753083 View in PubMed
Less detail

Building capacity for evidence informed decision making in public health: a case study of organizational change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126852
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:137
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Leslea Peirson
Donna Ciliska
Maureen Dobbins
David Mowat
Author Affiliation
McMaster University School of Nursing, Hamilton, ON, Canada. peirson@mcmaster.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:137
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capacity Building - organization & administration
Decision Making
Evidence-Based Practice
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Innovation
Public Health
Abstract
Core competencies for public health in Canada require proficiency in evidence informed decision making (EIDM). However, decision makers often lack access to information, many workers lack knowledge and skills to conduct systematic literature reviews, and public health settings typically lack infrastructure to support EIDM activities. This research was conducted to explore and describe critical factors and dynamics in the early implementation of one public health unit's strategic initiative to develop capacity to make EIDM standard practice.
This qualitative case study was conducted in one public health unit in Ontario, Canada between 2008 and 2010. In-depth information was gathered from two sets of semi-structured interviews and focus groups (n = 27) with 70 members of the health unit, and through a review of 137 documents. Thematic analysis was used to code the key informant and document data.
The critical factors and dynamics for building EIDM capacity at an organizational level included: clear vision and strong leadership, workforce and skills development, ability to access research (library services), fiscal investments, acquisition and development of technological resources, a knowledge management strategy, effective communication, a receptive organizational culture, and a focus on change management.
With leadership, planning, commitment and substantial investments, a public health department has made significant progress, within the first two years of a 10-year initiative, towards achieving its goal of becoming an evidence informed decision making organization.
Notes
Cites: Nurs Outlook. 2001 Nov-Dec;49(6):272-911753294
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2010 Jan-Feb;16(1):72-820009648
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2002 Jul;39(1):46-6012074751
Cites: Healthc Q. 2009 Oct;13 Spec No:30-620057246
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2010 Mar-Apr;16(2):167-7320150801
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:49620718970
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2011 Jan;72(1):31-821074923
Cites: Adm Policy Ment Health. 2011 Jan;38(1):4-2321197565
Cites: Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2011;6:2922059528
Cites: Biosecur Bioterror. 2004;2(2):118-2615225406
Cites: Healthc Q. 2004;7(3):35-615230165
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2004 Sep;19(5):336-4515310668
Cites: Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1989;5(2):227-4810303488
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1996 Mar;23(3):430-408655816
Cites: Qual Health Care. 1998 Sep;7(3):149-5810185141
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 1999 Sep;5(5):86-9710558389
Cites: J Nurs Care Qual. 2004 Oct-Dec;19(4):297-30415535533
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2004 Dec;27(5):417-2115556743
Cites: Health Policy. 2005 Jan;71(1):117-2515563998
Cites: Milbank Q. 2004;82(4):581-62915595944
Cites: Ment Health Serv Res. 2005 Dec;7(4):243-5916320107
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2006 Winter;26(1):13-2416557505
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:8916597331
Cites: Nurs Adm Q. 2006 Jul-Sep;30(3):236-4216878009
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Aug 29;175(5):493-416940269
Cites: J Public Health (Oxf). 2006 Dec;28(4):384-917082462
Cites: Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2004;1(2):120-817129325
Cites: Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2007;4(1):21-917355407
Cites: Health Care Manag (Frederick). 2008 Jan-Mar;27(1):23-3918510142
Cites: Milbank Q. 2008 Jun;86(2):177-20818522611
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2009;30:175-20119296775
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2002 Jan;7(1):10-811822256
PubMed ID
22348688 View in PubMed
Less detail

60 records – page 1 of 6.