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311 records – page 1 of 32.

18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography for suspected recurrent papillary thyroid cancer: early experience at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153281
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):712-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Max Dahele
Yee C Ung
Lisa Ehrlich
Jay Silverberg
Judith Balogh
C Shun Wong
Author Affiliation
Departmentof Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Edmond Odette Cancer Centre,Toronto, Ontario.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):712-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cancer Care Facilities
Carcinoma, Papillary - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Thyroglobulin - blood
Thyroid Neoplasms - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Thyroidectomy - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To report the initial experience with combined 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging for suspected recurrent papillary differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (SHSC), Toronto.
Single institution retrospective study.
Consecutive patients from SHSC who underwent FDG PET/CT imaging for suspected recurrent DTC over a period of 2.5 years were identified and their charts reviewed.
Qualitative appraisal of FDG PET/CT imaging in suspected recurrent DTC.
Sixteen patients (14F, 2M) were identified accounting for 17 FDG PET/CT scans. Three scans (18%) in 3 different patients were reported as suspicious for recurrent disease in the neck (1-3 lesions) and were considered "positive". All were subsequently confirmed pathologically (4-13 positive lymph nodes post operatively). Prior conventional imaging was abnormal in two patients. Two patients had an elevated non-stimulated thyroglobulin (TG)
PubMed ID
19128681 View in PubMed
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[40 years of the Oncological Service in Ul'ianovsk region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236114
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1987;33(9):70-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
M A Storozhuk
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1987;33(9):70-3
Date
1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cancer Care Facilities - history - organization & administration
History, 20th Century
Hospitals, Special - history
Humans
Mass Screening
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Russia
Abstract
The paper discusses the development of oncological service in Ulyanovsk region since 1946 when a 35-bedded dispensary was opened. By 1984, its capacity had reached 335 beds.
PubMed ID
2958967 View in PubMed
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Access to treatment and educational inequalities in cancer survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266954
Source
J Health Econ. 2014 Jul;36:98-111
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Jon H Fiva
Torbjørn Hægeland
Marte Rønning
Astri Syse
Source
J Health Econ. 2014 Jul;36:98-111
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cancer Care Facilities - utilization
Educational Status
Female
Geography
Health Behavior
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Physician-Patient Relations
Quality of Health Care
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialization - standards - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Travel
Abstract
The public health care systems in the Nordic countries provide high quality care almost free of charge to all citizens. However, social inequalities in health persist. Previous research has, for example, documented substantial educational inequalities in cancer survival. We investigate to what extent this may be driven by differential access to and utilization of high quality treatment options. Quasi-experimental evidence based on the establishment of regional cancer wards indicates that (i) highly educated individuals utilized centralized specialized treatment to a greater extent than less educated patients and (ii) the use of such treatment improved these patients' survival.
PubMed ID
24780404 View in PubMed
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Administrative outcomes five years after opening an acute palliative care unit at a comprehensive cancer center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145151
Source
J Palliat Med. 2010 May;13(5):559-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
John Bryson
Gary Coe
Nadia Swami
Patricia Murphy-Kane
Dori Seccareccia
Lisa W Le
Gary Rodin
Camilla Zimmermann
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Med. 2010 May;13(5):559-65
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cancer Care Facilities - organization & administration
Comprehensive Health Care - utilization
Female
Health Services Administration
Hospital Administration
Hospital Units
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - rehabilitation
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
We examined administrative outcomes after opening an oncology acute palliative care unit (APCU), to determine attainment of administrative targets related to the unit's function of acute palliation.
We retrospectively reviewed the administrative database for our APCU for the 5 years following its opening in 2003. Data were abstracted on demographic information, as well as source of admission, primary reason for admission, discharge destination, inpatient death rate, and length of stay. Linear regression and the Cochran-Armitage trend test were used for analysis. In keeping with targets set at the unit's opening, our primary hypotheses were that outpatient admissions, admissions for symptom control, and discharges home would increase over the study period; secondary hypotheses were that length of stay and inpatient death rate would decrease.
There were 1748 admissions during the study period: the median age was 64, 54% were women, and the most common cancer sites were gastrointestinal (24%), lung (20%), and gynecologic (13%). There were significant changes for all primary endpoints: outpatient admissions increased from 47% to 70% (p
PubMed ID
20192842 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated at pediatric versus adult hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119369
Source
Ann Oncol. 2013 Mar;24(3):801-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
J D Pole
S M H Alibhai
M C Ethier
O. Teuffel
C. Portwine
S. Zelcer
D L Johnston
M. Silva
S. Alexander
J M Brandwein
L. Sung
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Ann Oncol. 2013 Mar;24(3):801-6
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cancer Care Facilities
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - mortality - therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective was to compare 5-year overall survival (OS) between adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients (age 15-19) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated at a pediatric versus an adult center.
This was a population-based analysis using administrative data of Ontario ALL AYA patients diagnosed between 1986-2009. We calculated predicted survival proportions (PSPs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We also surveyed sites to determine whether pediatric or adult-based protocols were used in each period.
Overall, 290 patients between 15-19 years of age were diagnosed with ALL during the study period; 144 patients (49.7%) were treated at an adult center. When adjusted for gender, age, income quintile and time period, AYA patients treated at a pediatric center did not have a significantly different PSP (0.65, 95% CI: 0.56-0.75) in comparison to those treated at an adult center (0.62, 95% CI 0.52-0.73; P = 0.87). Most AYA patients treated at adult centers received pediatric protocols in the recent periods.
Using population-based data, AYA ALL patients had similar outcomes whether treated at a pediatric or an adult center. Early introduction of aggressive treatment protocols in adult centers may have negated differences in outcomes among AYA patients by site of care.
PubMed ID
23108950 View in PubMed
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Alarm symptoms of soft-tissue and bone sarcoma in patients referred to a specialist center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260959
Source
Acta Orthop. 2014 Dec;85(6):657-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Heidi B Dyrop
Peter Vedsted
Akmal Safwat
Katja Maretty-Nielsen
Bjarne H Hansen
Peter H Jørgensen
Thomas Baad-Hansen
Johnny Keller
Source
Acta Orthop. 2014 Dec;85(6):657-62
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bone Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cancer Care Facilities - utilization
Critical Pathways - utilization
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidental Findings
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Osteosarcoma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Sarcoma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Soft Tissue Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The Danish Cancer Patient Pathway for sarcoma defines a set of alarm symptoms as criteria for referral to a sarcoma center. This may exclude cancer patients without alarm symptoms, so we investigated the presence of alarm symptoms (defined as being indicative of a sarcoma) in patients who had been referred to the Aarhus Sarcoma Center.
We reviewed the medical records of all 1,126 patients who had been referred, with suspected sarcoma, from other hospitals in the period 2007-2010 for information on symptoms, clinical findings, and diagnosis. Alarm symptoms were analyzed for predictive values in diagnosing sarcoma.
179 (69%) of 258 sarcoma patients were referred with alarm symptoms (soft-tissue tumor>5 cm or deep-seated, fast-growing soft-tissue tumor, palpable bone tumor, or deep persisting bone pain). The remaining 79 sarcomas were found accidentally. "Size over 5 cm" for soft-tissue tumors, and "deep persisting bone pain" for bone tumors had the highest sensitivity and positive predictive value. Of the 79 sarcoma patients who were referred without alarm symptoms, 7 were found accidentally on imaging, 5 were referred with suspected recurrence of a sarcoma, 64 were referred with a confirmed histological diagnosis, and 3 were referred for other reasons.
Defined alarm symptoms are predictive of sarcoma, but one-third of the patients were found accidentally. Further studies on presenting symptoms in primary care are needed to assess the true value of alarm symptoms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25175662 View in PubMed
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Analysis of cigarette smoking habits of cancer patients referred to the Northeastern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183537
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2003;18(3):157-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Rajiv S Samant
Tara L Tucker
Author Affiliation
Radiation Oncology, Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre, 503 Smyth Road,Ottawa, ON, Canada. rajiv.samant@orcc.on.ca
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2003;18(3):157-60
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cancer Care Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Causality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To review cigarette smoking among patients referred to the Northeastern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre (NEORCC).
Database analysis of the smoking history information for patients referred to the NEORCC from 1991-1999 was performed.
Data was available for 15,850 patients and 72.7% reported being either current or previous smokers. Approximately 24.5% of patients were still smoking and 7.8% had quit within the last year. Smoking rates and total consumption were highest among those patients with cancers arising in the lung, bladder, esophagus and head & neck regions. The percentage of patients reporting a history of smoking remained consistently high over the time period studied.
Cigarette smoking rates are high among NEORCC patients and strategies to improve the situation are required.
PubMed ID
14512263 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the reasons for the late detection of malignant tumors (based on data from the Voroshilovgrad Province Oncological Dispensary)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27234
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1981;27(12):64-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
A V Zhivetskii
A I Zhalkovskii
G V Bodnar
B A Gerasimov
V A Kornev
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1981;27(12):64-8
Date
1981
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Autopsy
Cancer Care Facilities
Diagnosis, Differential
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Physical Examination
Precancerous Conditions - diagnosis
Time Factors
Ukraine
Abstract
The share of advanced malignant tumors is approximately 22.9%, the highest incidence rate (57.1%) being among patients aged 51--70 years. They show the following distribution for different sites: gastrointestinal tract--53.12; respiratory system--23.78; female genital organs--8.12; urinary system--6.13 and other sites--8.76%. Among the main causes of the detection of malignant tumors at advanced states are superficial, irregular check-ups, errors in clinical and roentgenologic diagnosis, latent course of the disease late application for medical aid and inadequate knowledge of oncology by general practitioners. With a view to improving the doctors' qualifications and raising the standards of mass screenings, Weeks of Oncologists are being conducted, short-term courses for advanced medical training and specialized oncological mass screenings for occupational tumors are organized; and Evening University of Oncology was established.
PubMed ID
7324405 View in PubMed
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311 records – page 1 of 32.