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203 records – page 1 of 21.

[2 new familial cases of ankylosing vertebral hyperostosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238146
Source
Rev Rhum Mal Osteoartic. 1985 Nov;52(11):645-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985

Abetting emigration of Canada's nurses and doctors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173514
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Mark Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Toronto Division of Neurosurgery, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network.
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):8-9
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
North Carolina
Nursing Staff - supply & distribution
Physicians - supply & distribution
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Q. 2004;7(3):suppl 2-1115230179
PubMed ID
16078391 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abortion referral and MD emigration: areas of concern and study for CMA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248948
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Jan 21;118(2):175, 206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-21-1978

Abuse of power in relationships and sexual health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289990
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Dionne Gesink
Lana Whiskeyjack
Terri Suntjens
Alanna Mihic
Priscilla McGilvery
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College St., 6th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M7, Canada. Electronic address: dionne.gesink@utoronto.ca.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 08; 58:12-23
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Sex Offenses - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Sexual Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - psychology
Suicide - ethnology - psychology
United States - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
STI rates are high for First Nations in Canada and the United States. Our objective was to understand the context, issues, and beliefs around high STI rates from a nêhiyaw (Cree) perspective. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 community participants between March 1, 2011 and May 15, 2011. Interviews were conducted by community researchers and grounded in the Cree values of relationship, sharing, personal agency and relational accountability. A diverse purposive snowball sample of community members were asked why they thought STI rates were high for the community. The remainder of the interview was unstructured, and supported by the interviewer through probes and sharing in a conversational style. Modified grounded theory was used to analyze the narratives and develop a theory. The main finding from the interviews was that abuse of power in relationships causes physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wounds that disrupt the medicine wheel. Wounded individuals seek medicine to stop suffering and find healing. Many numb suffering by accessing temporary medicines (sex, drugs and alcohol) or permanent medicines (suicide). These medicines increase the risk of STIs. Some seek healing by participating in ceremony and restoring relationships with self, others, Spirit/religion, traditional knowledge and traditional teachings. These medicines decrease the risk of STIs. Younger female participants explained how casual relationships are safer than committed monogamous relationships. Resolving abuse of power in relationships should lead to improvements in STI rates and sexual health.
PubMed ID
27337692 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to internet in rural and remote Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264077
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;201:407-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Leanne M Currie
Charlene Ronquillo
Tania Dick
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;201:407-12
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Canada - ethnology
Computer Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Consumer Health Information - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Canada is the second largest landmass country in the world, but has one of the lowest population densities. As of 2011, approximately 19% of the Canadian population lives in rural, or remote communities. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in rural and urban access to the Internet and device use in Canada, and to explore differences in access to broadband between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in Canada. In general rural-dwellers had lower levels of Internet access and despite efforts to increase access to high speed Internet, Aboriginal communities in some regions have limited access. Future research should explore computer and health literacy in the context of rural and remote communities in Canada.
PubMed ID
24943574 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accounting for the contribution of vitamin B to Canada's WWII effort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138851
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Robyn Braun
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta.
Source
J Hist Sociol. 2010;23(4):517-41
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - economics - history
Canada - ethnology
Flour - economics - history
Food, Fortified - economics - history
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Health - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Vitamin B Complex - history
Vitamin B Deficiency - ethnology - history
World War II
Abstract
Canada began to fortify its flour and bread with vitamin B when it entered the Second World War. The decision was informed by the biology of vitamin B and therefore I suggest that the complexity of this political maneuver can best be understood by considering the specificity of the biochemistry of vitamin B. In this paper I will show that the specific biology of vitamin B allowed the Canadian government the possibility of a healthier population under wartime conditions but also allowed the government a variety of means by which to develop and organize food processing practices to this end.
PubMed ID
21132948 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptive evolution of HIV at HLA epitopes is associated with ethnicity in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123483
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(5):e36933
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Manon Ragonnet-Cronin
Stéphane Aris-Brosou
Isabelle Joanisse
Harriet Merks
Dominic Vallee
Kyna Caminiti
Paul Sandstrom
James Brooks
Author Affiliation
National HIV and Retrovirology Laboratories, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(5):e36933
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - genetics
Adult
Alleles
Canada - ethnology
Epitopes - immunology
Evolution, Molecular
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - immunology - virology
HIV-1 - genetics - pathogenicity
HLA Antigens - genetics - immunology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Selection, Genetic
Young Adult
Abstract
Host immune selection pressure influences the development of mutations that allow for HIV escape. Mutation patterns induced in HIV by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) are HLA-allele specific. As ethnic groups have distinct and characteristic HLA allele frequencies, we can expect divergent viral evolution within ethnicities. Here, we have sequenced and analyzed the HIV pol gene from 1248 subtype B infected, treatment-na?ve individuals in Canada. Phylogenetic analysis showed no separation between pol sequences from five self-identified ethnic groups, yet fixation index (F(ST)) values showed significant divergence between ethnicities. A total of 17 amino acid sites showed an ethnic-specific fixation pattern (0.015
Notes
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PubMed ID
22693560 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and/or gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234796
Source
Cancer. 1987 Sep 1;60(5):1094-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1987
Author
W C MacDonald
J B MacDonald
Source
Cancer. 1987 Sep 1;60(5):1094-8
Date
Sep-1-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Alcohol Drinking
Barrett Esophagus - pathology
Canada - ethnology
Cardia - pathology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Smoking
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
United States - ethnology
Abstract
One hundred twenty-nine adenocarcinomas involving the esophagus and/or gastric cardia differed significantly from 212 cancers of the rest of the stomach as follows: male-female ratio, 6:1 versus 2:1, birth outside Canada, US or UK, 12% versus 34%; parent or sibling with gastric cancer, 5% versus 13%; previous duodenal ulcer, 23% versus 9%; chronic reflux symptoms, 25% versus 3%; hiatal hernia, 51% versus 11%. Of the 129 esophagocardia cancers, 24 involved the esophagus alone, 48 the cardia and esophagus, 33 the cardia alone or cardia and fundus, and 24 the upper stomach and lower esophagus extensively. Thirty-four were associated with Barrett's esophagus. The 72 patients with involvement of both the upper stomach and lower esophagus (48 cardia and esophagus, 24 extensive) were identical with the esophagocardia group as a whole. The 24 patients with esophageal cancer and the 34 with Barrett's epithelium were the same clinically as the whole esophagocardia group except more had chronic reflux and hiatal hernia. The 33 patients with cancer confined to the cardia or cardia and fundus resembled the whole esophagocardia group but did not have Barrett's esophagus. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagocardia region is probably a different disease from cancer of the rest of the stomach.
PubMed ID
3607726 View in PubMed
Less detail

"A future not of riches but of comfort": the emigration of pauper children from Bristol to Canada, 1870-1915.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162686
Source
Immigr Minor. 2000;19(1):25-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
M. Martin
Author Affiliation
University of the West of England, Bristol.
Source
Immigr Minor. 2000;19(1):25-52
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - ethnology
Child
Child Care - economics - ethics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - supply & distribution - trends
Child, Preschool
Colonialism - classification - history
Emigration and Immigration - classification - history - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data - trends
England
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Legislation as Topic - classification - ethics - history - trends
Orphanages - economics - ethics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - manpower - methods - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution - trends
Politics
Poverty - economics - ethics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data - trends
Social Welfare - classification - ethics - history - statistics & numerical data - trends
Women - history
Abstract
This article examines the emigration of orphan and deserted children from Bristol to Canada in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This emigration was organised and financed by the local Boards of Guardians and, as such, raises important questions about the way in which state agencies cared for dependent children. The emigration of Poor Law children is explored in relation to debates about childcare, poverty, racial degeneration and imperialism. Of particular interest is the role played by women in promoting child emigration and the article considers the women's contribution to discourse and practice, both locally and nationally. The dynamics of emigration are analysed by using both British and Canadian sources and the tensions associated with pauper emigration are examined in some detail.
PubMed ID
17607864 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ah-ayitaw isi e-ki-kiskeyihtahkik maskihkiy. They knew both sides of medicine: Cree tales of curing and cursing told by Alice Ahenakew. [Review of: Ahenakew, A. Ah-ayitaw isi e-ki-kiskeyihtahkik maskihkiy. They knew both sides of medicine: Cree tales of curing and cursing told by Alice Ahenakew. Winnipeg: U. of Manitoba Pr., 2000].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168606
Source
Can Hist Rev. 2002;83(3):432-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002

203 records – page 1 of 21.