Skip header and navigation

Refine By

757 records – page 1 of 76.

A 12-year cohort study on adverse pregnancy outcomes in Eastern Townships of Canada: impact of endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256963
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Aziz Aris
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, Clinical Research Centre of Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre , Sherbrooke, Quebec , Canada.
Source
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2014 Jan;30(1):34-7
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Endometriosis - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Peritoneal Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide a temporal-spatial reference of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) and examine whether endometriosis promotes APO in the same population. Among the 31?068 women who had a pregnancy between 1997 and 2008 in Eastern Townships of Canada, 6749 (21.7%) had APO. These APO increased significantly with maternal age and over time (r(2?)=?0.522, p?=?0.008); and were dominated by preterm birth (9.3%), pregnancy-induced hypertension (8.3%) including gestational hypertension (6.5%), low birth weight (6.3%), gestational diabetes (3.4%), pregnancy loss (2.2%) including spontaneous abortion (1.5%) and stillbirth (0.6%), intrauterine growth restriction (2.1%) and preeclampsia (1.8%). Among the 31?068 pregnancies, 784 (2.5%) had endometriosis and 183 (23.3%) had both endometriosis and APO. Endometriosis has been shown to increase the incidence of fetal loss (OR?=?2.03; 95% CI?=?1.42-2.90, p?
PubMed ID
24134807 View in PubMed
Less detail

99th Dahlem conference on infection, inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders: immune therapies of type 1 diabetes: new opportunities based on the hygiene hypothesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144028
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2010 Apr;160(1):106-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
L. Chatenoud
S. You
H. Okada
C. Kuhn
B. Michaud
J-F Bach
Author Affiliation
Université Paris Descarte, Paris, France. lucienne.chatenoud@inserm.fr
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2010 Apr;160(1):106-12
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Autoantigens - immunology
Bacteria - immunology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - immunology - therapy
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Hygiene
Hypersensitivity - immunology
Immunosuppression - methods
Immunotherapy - methods
Infection - immunology - microbiology
Mice
Pancreatitis - immunology - microbiology
Toll-Like Receptors - agonists
Young Adult
Abstract
Insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes is a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease resulting from the selective destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells within pancreatic islets of Langerhans by an immune-mediated inflammation involving autoreactive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes which infiltrate pancreatic islets. Current treatment is substitutive, i.e. chronic use of exogenous insulin which, in spite of significant advances, is still associated with major constraints (multiple daily injections, risks of hypoglycaemia) and lack of effectiveness over the long term in preventing severe degenerative complications. Finding a cure for autoimmune diabetes by establishing effective immune-based therapies is a real medical health challenge, as the disease incidence increases steadily in industrialized countries. As the disease affects mainly children and young adults, any candidate immune therapy must therefore be safe and avoid a sustained depression of immune responses with the attendant problems of recurrent infection and drug toxicity. Thus, inducing or restoring immune tolerance to target autoantigens, controlling the pathogenic response while preserving the host reactivity to exogenous/unrelated antigens, appears to be the ideal approach. Our objective is to review the major progress accomplished over the last 20 years towards that aim. In addition, we would like to present another interesting possibility to access new preventive strategies based on the 'hygiene hypothesis', which proposes a causal link between the increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases, including diabetes, and the decrease of the infectious burden. The underlying rationale is to identify microbial-derived compounds mediating the protective activity of infections which could be developed therapeutically.
Notes
Cites: J Immunol. 2000 Jun 1;164(11):5683-810820244
Cites: Clin Exp Immunol. 2010 Apr;160(1):1-920415844
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Aug 12;356(9229):545-910950231
Cites: Diabetologia. 2000 Aug;43(8):1000-410990077
Cites: J Immunol. 2000 Dec 1;165(11):6148-5511086048
Cites: Annu Rev Immunol. 2001;19:131-6111244033
Cites: J Immunol. 2001 Jul 15;167(2):1081-911441119
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Nov 24;358(9295):1749-5311734230
Cites: Nature. 2002 Apr 11;416(6881):603-711948342
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2002 Apr 16;99(8):5539-4411943868
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 May 30;346(22):1685-9112037147
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 May 30;346(22):1740-212037155
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Sep 19;347(12):911-2012239261
Cites: Vaccine. 2003 Feb 14;21(9-10):836-4212547591
Cites: Int Immunopharmacol. 2003 Mar;3(3):417-2512639819
Cites: Science. 1984 Mar 30;223(4643):1362-76367043
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Jul 19;2(8499):119-242873396
Cites: Diabetes. 1986 Aug;35(8):855-603525284
Cites: J Exp Med. 1989 May 1;169(5):1669-802523954
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Nov 18;299(6710):1259-602513902
Cites: J Autoimmun. 1989 Dec;2(6):759-762533502
Cites: Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo). 1992 Apr;40(4):1004-61525928
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1994 Jan 4;91(1):123-78278351
Cites: Endocr Rev. 1994 Aug;15(4):516-427988484
Cites: Diabetes Metab. 1996 Oct;22(5):341-88896996
Cites: J Exp Med. 1996 Nov 1;184(5):2049-538920894
Cites: J Immunol. 1997 Mar 15;158(6):2947-549058834
Cites: Immunology. 1962 May;5:378-8813887798
Cites: Nat Med. 2005 Feb;11(2):138-4515654326
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Jun 23;352(25):2598-60815972866
Cites: J Exp Med. 2005 Oct 17;202(8):1131-916230478
Cites: J Exp Med. 2005 Nov 7;202(9):1171-716260486
Cites: Diabetes. 2006 Jan;55(1):179-8516380491
Cites: J Neuroimmunol. 2006 Mar;172(1-2):94-10316360885
Cites: Immunol Rev. 2006 Aug;212:185-20216903915
Cites: J Med Chem. 2006 Oct 5;49(20):6000-1417004714
Cites: Immunobiology. 2006;211(10):767-7717113914
Cites: Nat Rev Immunol. 2007 May;7(5):353-6417457343
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2007 Oct;8 Suppl 6:6-1417727380
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2007 Dec;117(12):3857-6718060033
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Feb 14;358(7):676-8818272891
Cites: J Immunol. 2008 Mar 1;180(5):2863-7518292508
Cites: Lancet. 2008 May 24;371(9626):1777-8218502302
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Oct 30;359(18):1909-2018843118
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Nov 15;372(9651):1746-5518814906
Cites: Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2009 Apr;5(4):219-2619352320
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jun 13;373(9680):2027-3319481249
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2009 Nov;32(11):2036-4019690081
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Nov 26;361(22):2143-5219940299
Cites: Eur J Biochem. 2000 Jun;267(11):3370-710824125
PubMed ID
20415859 View in PubMed
Less detail

2012 Pediatric Report: devastating at any age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116028
Source
Bull Am Coll Surg. 2013 Feb;98(2):59-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Richard J Fantus
Michael L Nance
Author Affiliation
Trauma Services, Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Chicago, USA.
Source
Bull Am Coll Surg. 2013 Feb;98(2):59-60
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
General Surgery
Humans
Infant
Pediatrics
Registries
Research Report
Societies, Medical
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Young Adult
PubMed ID
23441511 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2015 National Canadian Homeless Youth Survey: Mental Health and Addiction Findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291013
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2017 07; 62(7):493-500
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2017
Author
Sean A Kidd
Stephen Gaetz
Bill O'Grady
Author Affiliation
1 Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2017 07; 62(7):493-500
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Homeless Youth - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sexual and Gender Minorities - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study was designed to provide a representative description of the mental health of youth accessing homelessness services in Canada. It is the most extensive survey in this area to date and is intended to inform the development of mental health and addiction service and policy for this marginalized population.
This study reports mental health-related data from the 2015 "Leaving Home" national youth homelessness survey, which was administered through 57 agencies serving homeless youth in 42 communities across the country. This self-reported, point-in-time survey assessed a broad range of demographic information, pre-homelessness and homelessness variables, and mental health indicators.
Survey data were obtained from 1103 youth accessing Canadian homelessness services in the Nunavut territory and all Canadian provinces except for Prince Edward Island. Forty-two per cent of participants reported 1 or more suicide attempts, 85.4% fell in a high range of psychological distress, and key indicators of risk included an earlier age of the first episode of homelessness, female gender, and identifying as a sexual and/or gender minority (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and 2 spirit [LGBTQ2S]).
This study provides clear and compelling evidence of a need for mental health support for these youth, particularly LGBTQ2S youth and female youth. The mental health concerns observed here, however, must be considered in the light of the tremendous adversity in all social determinants faced by these youth, with population-level interventions best leveraged in prevention and rapid response.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Aug 29;352(9129):743 PMID 9729028
Cites: J Youth Adolesc. 2012 May;41(5):533-43 PMID 22302217
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Aug;57(3):561-9 PMID 12791497
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2015 Nov;60(11):467-74 PMID 26720504
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Aug 4;292(5):569-74 PMID 15292082
Cites: Am J Addict. 2006;15 Suppl 1:80-91 PMID 17182423
Cites: J Adolesc. 2011 Oct;34(5):1049-54 PMID 21122909
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2004 Mar;13(2):299-310 PMID 15085902
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Dec;45(6):571-8 PMID 19931829
Cites: J Adolesc. 2007 Apr;30(2):283-96 PMID 16631925
Cites: J Couns Psychol. 2010 Jul;57(3):274-89 PMID 21133579
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2001 Sep;46(7):617-21 PMID 11582822
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Oct 1;67(10 ):1083-1090 PMID 27247178
Cites: J Nurs Meas. 2009;17(2):105-13 PMID 19711709
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 May;92(5):773-7 PMID 11988446
PubMed ID
28372467 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection: prospective cohort study in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115630
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Apr;17(4):473-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
P W Colson
Y. Hirsch-Moverman
J. Bethel
P. Vempaty
K. Salcedo
K. Wall
W. Miranda
S. Collins
C R Horsburgh
Author Affiliation
Charles P Felton National Tuberculosis Center, International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA. pwc2@columbia.edu
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Apr;17(4):473-9
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Appointments and Schedules
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Latent Tuberculosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Refusal
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
An estimated 300?000 individuals are treated for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in the United States and Canada annually. Little is known about the proportion or characteristics of those who decline treatment.
To define the proportion of individuals in various groups who accept LTBI treatment and to identify factors associated with non-acceptance of treatment.
Persons offered LTBI treatment at 30 clinics in 12 Tuberculosis Epidemiologic Studies Consortium sites were prospectively enrolled. Multivariate regression models were constructed based on manual stepwise assessment of potential predictors.
Of 1692 participants enrolled from March 2007 to September 2008, 1515 (89.5%) accepted treatment and 177 (10.5%) declined. Predictors of acceptance included believing one could personally spread TB germs, having greater TB knowledge, finding clinic schedules convenient and having low acculturation. Predictors of non-acceptance included being a health care worker, being previously recommended for treatment and believing that taking medicines would be problematic.
This is the first prospective multisite study to examine predictors of LTBI treatment acceptance in general clinic populations. Greater efforts should be made to increase acceptance among health care workers, those previously recommended for treatment and those who expect problems with LTBI medicines. Ensuring convenient clinic schedules and TB education to increase knowledge could be important for ensuring acceptance.
PubMed ID
23485381 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute care hospitalization of Aboriginal children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295326
Source
Health Rep. 2017 Jul 19; 28(7):11-17
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-19-2017
Author
Anne Guèvremont
Gisèle Carrière
Evelyne Bougie
Dafna Kohen
Author Affiliation
Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Health Rep. 2017 Jul 19; 28(7):11-17
Date
Jul-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Censuses
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Patient Discharge
Young Adult
Abstract
Research that has examined Aboriginal children's hospitalization rates at the national level has been limited to analyses of areas with large percentages of Aboriginal residents, rather than of Aboriginal individuals. This study uses linked census and administrative data to describe hospitalization patterns among children and youth aged 0 to 19, by Aboriginal identity, for all provinces and territories except Quebec.
The 2006 Census was linked to the 2006/2007-to-2008/2009 Discharge Abstract Database, which contains hospital records from all acute care facilities (except Quebec). Hospital records were examined by Aboriginal identity, as reported to the census, according to International Classification of Diseases chapters based on "the most responsible diagnosis." Age-standardized hospitalization rates (ASHRs) were calculated per 100,000 population, and age-standardized rate ratios (RRs) were calculated for Aboriginal groups relative to non-Aboriginal people.
ASHRs were consistently higher among Aboriginal children and youth relative to their non-Aboriginal counterparts; rates for children aged 0 to 9 were 1.4 to 1.8 times higher; for youth aged 10 to 19, 2.0 to 3.8 times higher. For all children aged 0 to 9, the leading cause of hospitalization was "diseases of the respiratory system," but RRs for Aboriginal children ranged from 1.7 to 2.5, compared with non-Aboriginal children. Disparities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal 10- to 19-year-olds were pronounced for injuries due to assaults (RRs from 4.8 to 10.0), self-inflicted injuries (RRs from 2.7 to 14.2), and pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (RRs from 4.1 to 9.8).
Additional research is needed to examine reasons for the disparities in hospitalization rates between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children and youth.
PubMed ID
28722747 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute illness associated with use of pest strips - seven U.S. States and Canada, 2000-2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105281
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Jan 17;63(2):42-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-2014
Author
Rebecca J Tsai
Jennifer Sievert
Joanne Prado
Kaci Buhl
Dave L Stone
Mathias Forrester
Shelia Higgins
Yvette Mitchell
Abby Schwartz
Geoffrey M Calvert
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Jan 17;63(2):42-3
Date
Jan-17-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Dichlorvos - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Insect Control - methods
Insecticides - toxicity
Male
Middle Aged
Product Labeling
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Dichlorvos-impregnated resin strips (DDVP pest strips) are among the few organophosphate products still available for indoor residential use. The residential uses for most other organophosphate products, including most DDVP products, were canceled because they posed unreasonable risks to children. DDVP pest strips act by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain and nerves of insect pests and are designed to gradually release DDVP vapor for up to 4 months. Acute illnesses in humans associated with nonlethal acute exposures usually resolve completely, but recovery is not always rapid. To assess the frequency of acute illnesses associated with DDVP pest strips, cases from 2000 through June 2013 were sought from the 12 states that participate in the Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR)-Pesticides Program, the National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC), and Health Canada.* A total of 31 acute DDVP pest strip-related illness cases were identified in seven U.S. states and Canada. The majority of these illnesses resulted from use of the product in commonly occupied living areas (e.g., kitchens and bedrooms), in violation of label directions. Although 26 of the 31 cases involved mild health effects of short duration, five persons had moderate health effects. Illnesses caused by excess exposure to DDVP pest strips can be reduced by educating the public about the proper usage of DDVP pest strips and with improvements in label directions.
PubMed ID
24430101 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence and barriers to H. pylori treatment in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105338
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22791
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Megan Lefebvre
Hsiu-Ju Chang
Amy Morse
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Karen Jean Goodman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22791
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Helicobacter Infections - drug therapy - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Proton Pump Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori infection is an emerging health concern to some northern Canadian Aboriginal communities and their clinicians. Clinicians in the north perceive H. pylori infection to be a major clinical problem because they find H. pylori infection in many patients evaluated for common stomach complaints, leading to frequent demand for treatment, which often fails. Moreover, public health authorities identified the need for information to develop locally appropriate H. pylori control strategies. We described adherence and identified barriers to completing treatment among H. pylori-positive participants in a community-based project inspired by local concerns about H. pylori infection risks.
In 2008, 110 H. pylori-positive participants (diagnosed by a breath test, histopathology and/or culture) of the Aklavik H. pylori project were randomised to standard-of-care or sequential treatment. We ascertained adherence by interviewing participants using a structured questionnaire. We estimated adherence frequencies as the proportion of participants who reported taking either 100% of doses (perfect adherence) or =80% of doses (good adherence). To compare the proportion with perfect or good adherence in subgroups, we report proportion differences and 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Of 87 participants who were interviewed, 64% reported perfect adherence and 80% reported good adherence. We observed more frequent perfect adherence for: standard therapy (67%) versus sequential (62%); males (76%) versus females (52%); participants 40-77 years (79%) versus 17-39 (50%). Proportion differences were 5% (CI: -15, 25) for standard versus sequential therapy; 23% (CI: 4, 43) for male versus female; and 29% (CI: 10, 48) for 40-77 versus 15-39 years for perfect adherence. Of the 29 participants who reported poor adherence (
Notes
Cites: J Hypertens Suppl. 1985 Apr;3(1):S3-93916440
Cites: Hypertension. 1980 Nov-Dec;2(6):757-647007235
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004 Nov 15;20(10):1071-8215569109
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2005 Jul;19(7):412-416010302
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Nov 1;41(9):1261-816206100
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2007 Mar 1;25(5):523-3617305754
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Mar;22(3):289-9518354758
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Nov;22(11):912-619018336
Cites: Gastroenterology. 1992 Feb;102(2):493-61732120
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1995 Oct;24(5):875-878557443
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1999 Oct 25;159(19):2312-610547171
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 May 15;134(10):968-7711352698
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2002 Feb;31(1):128-3911914309
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2003 Sep 16;139(6):463-913679322
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2004 Sep;18(9):547-5415457293
Cites: Lancet. 1975 May 31;1(7918):1205-748832
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 1999 Aug;13(8):1047-5510468680
PubMed ID
24416723 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjuvant chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: practice patterns and outcomes in the general population of Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127316
Source
J Thorac Oncol. 2012 Mar;7(3):559-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Christopher M Booth
Frances A Shepherd
Yingwei Peng
Gail Darling
Gavin Li
Weidong Kong
William J Mackillop
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's University Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Canada. boothc@kgh.kari.net
Source
J Thorac Oncol. 2012 Mar;7(3):559-66
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Carboplatin - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Large Cell - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Cisplatin - administration & dosage
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Physician's Practice Patterns
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Vinblastine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Young Adult
Abstract
Adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) is known to improve survival in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Herein, we describe chemotherapy regimens used, dose modifications, survival, and treatment-related toxicity in the general population.
All cases of non-small cell lung cancer diagnosed in Ontario in the period 2004-2006 who underwent surgical resection (n = 3354) were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry in this population-based retrospective cohort study. We linked electronic records of treatment to the registry to identify all cases treated with ACT (n = 1032) and describe drugs, regimens, and dosages delivered. As a proxy measure of ACT-related toxicity, we evaluated deaths and hospitalizations within 16 weeks of starting ACT. Factors associated with dose modification were evaluated by logistic regression. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to describe associations between patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors and survival.
ACT regimens were identified for 584 of 1032 ACT cases. Almost all cases included cisplatin- or carboplatin-based regimens (478/584, 82%, and 99/584, 17%, respectively). The most common regimen was a vinroelbine/cisplatin doublet (412/584, 71%); 64% of these cases had a dose reduction or omission. Dose modification was not associated with inferior survival on multivariate analysis. Twelve percent of all ACT cases were admitted to hospital within 16 weeks of starting ACT, and there was a 1.6% death rate potentially attributable to ACT. Survival of all ACT cases was comparable with outcomes reported in clinical trials.
ACT regimens used, toxicity, and survival outcomes in the general population are comparable with those reported in clinical trials. Dose modifications used in clinical practice are not associated with inferior survival.
PubMed ID
22307012 View in PubMed
Less detail

Admission to hospital for pneumonia and influenza attributable to 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 influenza in First Nations communities in three provinces of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105054
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1029
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Michael E Green
Sabrina T Wong
Josée G Lavoie
Jeff Kwong
Leonard MacWilliam
Sandra Peterson
Guoyuan Liu
Alan Katz
Author Affiliation
Departments of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. michael.green@dfm.queensu.ca.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1029
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - ethnology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - ethnology - therapy
Risk assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Early reports of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic (pH1N1) indicated that a disproportionate burden of illness fell on First Nations reserve communities. In addition, the impact of the pandemic on different communities may have been influenced by differing provincial policies. We compared hospitalization rates for pneumonia and influenza (P&I) attributable to pH1N1 influenza between residents of First Nations reserve communities and the general population in three Canadian provinces.
Hospital admissions were geocoded using administrative claims data from three Canadian provincial data centres to identify residents of First Nations communities. Hospitalizations for P&I during both waves of pH1N1 were compared to the same time periods for the four previous years to establish pH1N1-attributable rates.
Residents of First Nations communities were more likely than other residents to have a pH1N1-attributable P&I hospitalization (rate ratio [RR] 2.8-9.1). Hospitalization rates for P&I were also elevated during the baseline period (RR 1.5-2.1) compared to the general population. There was an average increase of 45% over the baseline in P&I admissions for First Nations in all 3 provinces. In contrast, admissions overall increased by approximately 10% or less in British Columbia and Manitoba and by 33% in Ontario. Subgroup analysis showed no additional risk for remote or isolated First Nations compared to other First Nations communities in Ontario or Manitoba, with similar rates noted in Manitoba and a reduction in P&I admissions during the pandemic period in remote and isolated First Nations communities in Ontario.
We found an increased risk for pH1N1-related hospital admissions for First Nations communities in all 3 provinces. Interprovincial differences may be partly explained by differences in age structure and socioeconomic status. We were unable to confirm the assumption that remote communities were at higher risk for pH1N1-associated hospitalizations. The aggressive approach to influenza control in remote and isolated First Nations communities in Ontario may have played a role in limiting the impact of pH1N1 on residents of those communities.
Notes
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(6):e3943722761796
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2012 Aug;102(8):e51-822698024
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2011 Sep;17(9):1615-2321888786
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;21(8):623-3021737049
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Dec 14;182(18):1981-721059773
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Aug;71(4):717-2420554364
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Mar 9;182(4):349-5520159893
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Feb 23;182(3):257-6420093297
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009 Dec 11;58(48):1341-420010508
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009 Nov 13;58(44):1236-4119910911
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Nov 12;361(20):1935-4419815859
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2009;14(42). pii: 1936619883543
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2009 May 8;58(17):453-819444146
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2012 Mar-Apr;103(2):90-322530528
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;18(1):71-722257434
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):345-822032099
PubMed ID
24499143 View in PubMed
Less detail

757 records – page 1 of 76.