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317 records – page 1 of 32.

12-month prevalence of depression among single and married mothers in the 1994 National Population Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200239
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Sep-Oct;90(5):320-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Cairney
C. Thorpe
J. Rietschlin
W R Avison
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Sep-Oct;90(5):320-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Marital status
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Single Parent - psychology
Abstract
While a number of studies have documented higher period prevalence rates of depression among single as compared to married mothers, all of the data have been based upon community surveys of mental illness. In Canada, all of the published work comes from Ontario. As a result, we do not know whether these results hold true for other regions of the country. Using a nationally representative sample, we find, consistent with previous work, that single mothers have almost double the 12-month prevalence rates of married mothers (15.4% versus 6.8%). As well, there are no significant differences in rates of depression between single and married mothers by region/province of the country. Our findings are compared with other epidemiologic data on the mental health of single mothers from Ontario.
PubMed ID
10570576 View in PubMed
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Active and passive smoking and the risk of stomach cancer, by subsite, in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190831
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2002 Feb;11(1):27-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Y. Mao
J. Hu
R. Semenciw
K. White
Author Affiliation
Surveillance & Risk Assessment, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture AL0601C1, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0L2, Canada. Yang_Mao@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2002 Feb;11(1):27-38
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cardia
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Stomach Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
This study assessed the influence of active and passive smoking on the risk of stomach cancer by subsite. Mailed questionnaires were used to obtain information on 1171 newly diagnosed histologically confirmed stomach cancer cases and 2207 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in eight Canadian provinces. Data were collected on socio-economic status, lifestyle and passive smoking status. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were derived by logistic regression. Compared with those who had never smoked, there was strongly increased risk for ex- and current smokers among subjects with cardial stomach cancer. For men with cardial cancer, the adjusted ORs were 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-3.0) and 2.6 (95% CI 1.6-4.3) for ex-smokers and current smokers, respectively, with a similar pattern among women. Among men, the adjusted ORs were lower for subsites of stomach cancer other than cardia. These findings suggest that active and passive smoking may play an important role in the development of cardial stomach cancer.
PubMed ID
11917206 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences in relation to mood and anxiety disorders in a population-based sample of active military personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124248
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Jan;43(1):73-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
J. Sareen
C A Henriksen
S L Bolton
T O Afifi
M B Stein
G J G Asmundson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. sareen@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Jan;43(1):73-84
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although it has been posited that exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) increases vulnerability to deployment stress, previous literature in this area has demonstrated conflicting results. Using a cross-sectional population-based sample of active military personnel, the present study examined the relationship between ACEs, deployment related stressors and mood and anxiety disorders.
Data were analyzed from the 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey-Canadian Forces Supplement (CCHS-CFS; n = 8340, age 18-54 years, response rate 81%). The following ACEs were self-reported retrospectively: childhood physical abuse, childhood sexual abuse, economic deprivation, exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce/separation, parental substance abuse problems, hospitalization as a child, and apprehension by a child protection service. DSM-IV mood and anxiety disorders [major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic attacks/disorder and social phobia] were assessed using the composite international diagnostic interview (CIDI).
Even after adjusting for the effects of deployment-related traumatic exposures (DRTEs), exposure to ACEs was significantly associated with past-year mood or anxiety disorder among men [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.34, 99% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.73, p
PubMed ID
22608015 View in PubMed
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Age-specific patterns of factors related to fatal motor vehicle traffic crashes: focus on young and elderly drivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204007
Source
Public Health. 1998 Sep;112(5):289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
J. Zhang
S. Fraser
J. Lindsay
K. Clarke
Y. Mao
Author Affiliation
Environmental Risk Assessment and Case Surveillance Division, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control (LCDC), Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Public Health. 1998 Sep;112(5):289-95
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Automobile Driving - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Humans
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Abstract
This population-based study examines patterns of fatal motor vehicle traffic crashes (MVTCs) by age group (16-24, 25-64, 65+) among Canadian drivers. The Canadian Traffic Accident Information Databank (TRAID) provided information about fata MVTCs between 1984 and 1993. Distribution of risk factors was compared by age group. Crude odds ratios and 95% CIs were calculated for both young and elderly drivers compared with middle-aged drivers. The middle-age group was selected as reference population since it demonstrates the lowest risk of fatality. Compared to the middle-aged group, young drivers demonstrated excess risk for (1) risk-taking behaviours and conditions, specifically alcohol and illicit drug use, speeding, non use of seat belts, fatigue and falling asleep, and inexperience; (2) crashes during the summer, during weekends and at night; and (3) single-vehicle collisions and on performing overtaking manoeuvres. Excess risk among elderly drivers was noted for (1) medical and physical conditions, inattention and inexperience; (2) driver actions, for example, improper turning, failure to yield right-to-way; (3) occurrence on weekdays and during the day; and (4) collisions at intersection and vehicle--vehicle sideswipes. The results show notable differences in risk factors by age group and confirm the need for preventive efforts that incorporate age-specific strategies.
PubMed ID
9807923 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and injury: a comparison of emergency room populations in two Canadian provinces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200380
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1999 Nov;25(4):743-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
C J Cherpitel
N. Giesbrecht
S. Macdonald
Author Affiliation
Alcohol Research Group, Public Health Institute, Berkeley, California, USA.
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1999 Nov;25(4):743-59
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Drinking Behavior
Emergency medical services
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Substance-Related Disorders - complications
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The few comparative emergency room (ER) studies reported have found alcohol's role in injury occurrence to vary and suggest that regional and cultural differences in drinking patterns may account, in part, for this variation. To further this research, a probability sample of 1708 ER patients was interviewed regarding the role of alcohol in the event, usual drinking patterns, and alcohol-related problems and a urine sample was obtained to estimate blood alcohol concentration (BAC). The sample was from ERs in two Canadian provinces with distinctly different cultures: primarily English-speaking Alberta and French-speaking Quebec. While differences in demographic and drinking characteristics between injured and noninjured in both the Alberta and Quebec ERs were similar to those in other ER studies, the injured in the Alberta ER were more likely to be positive for estimated BAC; to have higher BAC levels; to report drinking prior to the event; and, among those reporting drinking, to have consumed a larger number of drinks and to report feeling drunk at the time of injury compared to those in Quebec. These differences may be associated with cultural differences in typical drinking patterns, with higher rates of abstinence reported in the Alberta ER, but also with higher rates of heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems, while those in the Quebec ER were more likely to report consuming smaller quantities with greater frequency (typical of wine-drinking cultures). Additional research is needed to explicate further alcohol's role in injury occurrence for planning effective prevention strategies that are both culturally relevant and specific.
PubMed ID
10548446 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and other beverage use and prostate cancer risk among Canadian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203798
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Dec 9;78(6):707-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-9-1998
Author
M G Jain
G T Hislop
G R Howe
J D Burch
P. Ghadirian
Author Affiliation
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada. meera.jain@utoronto.ca
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Dec 9;78(6):707-11
Date
Dec-9-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Beverages
Canada - epidemiology
Carbonated Beverages
Case-Control Studies
Coffee
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Prostatic Neoplasms - etiology
Risk factors
Tea
Abstract
There are very few large scale studies that have examined the association of prostate cancer with alcohol and other beverages. This relationship was examined in a case-control study conducted in 3 geographical areas of Canada [Metropolitan Toronto (Ontario), Montreal (Quebec), and Vancouver (British Columbia)] with 617 incident cases and 637 population controls. Complete history of beverage intake was assessed by a personal interview with reference to a 1-year period prior to diagnosis or interview. In age- and energy-adjusted models for all centers combined, the odds ratio (OR) for the highest quintile of total alcohol intake was 0.89. For alcoholic beverages separately, it was 0.68 for the highest tertile of beer, 1.12 for wine and 0.86 for liquor. The decreasing trend was significant for beer intake. The results were only significant for British Columbia out of all the 3 centers studied. Whereas coffee and cola intake was not associated with prostate cancer, a decrease in risk was observed with tea intake of more than 500 g per day (OR 0.70). Our results do not support a positive association between total alcohol, coffee and prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
9833763 View in PubMed
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Alcohol disorders in Canada as indicated by the CAGE questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207147
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Dec 1;157(11):1529-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1997
Author
C. Poulin
I. Webster
E. Single
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. Christiane.Poulin@dal.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1997 Dec 1;157(11):1529-35
Date
Dec-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To describe alcohol disorders in the general Canadian population, using as a standard indicator the CAGE questionnaire (Have you felt you needed to cut down on your drinking? Have you felt annoyed by criticism of your drinking? Have you felt guilty about drinking? Have you felt you needed a drink first thing in the morning [eye-opener]?).
Secondary analysis of data from Canada's Alcohol and Other Drugs Survey (CADS), a national telephone survey conducted in 1994 of a representative sample of 12,155 people aged 15 years or more.
The CAGE questionnaire was administered to 5894 drinkers who had consumed alcohol in the 12 months before the CADS survey.
Respondents with positive (2 or more affirmative responses) and negative results on the CAGE questionnaire were compared as to demographic characteristics, alcohol consumption and harmful consequences of their drinking. Independent predictors of a positive result were identified by means of logistic regression analysis.
A total of 5.8% of CAGE-tested current drinkers had a positive result on the past-year CAGE in 1994. The proportion of respondents reporting alcohol-related problems in one or more areas of their life was 7 times greater among drinkers with a positive result on the CAGE questionnaire than among those with a negative result (66.8% v. 9.5%) (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
9400407 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking and renal cell carcinoma in Canadian men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157674
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2008;32(1):7-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Jinfu Hu
Yue Chen
Yang Mao
Marie Desmeules
Les Mery
Author Affiliation
Evidence and Risk Assessment Division, Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, 120 Colonnade Road, AL 6701A, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Jinfu_Hu@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2008;32(1):7-14
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies have reported that moderate alcohol consumption is inversely associated with the risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but sex-specific results are inconsistent. The present study examines the association between alcohol intake and the risk of RCC among men and women.
Mailed questionnaires were completed by 1138 newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed RCC cases and 5039 population controls between 1994 and 1997 in eight Canadian provinces. A food frequency questionnaire provided data on eating habits and alcohol consumption 2 years before data collection. Other information included socio-economic status, lifestyle habits, alcohol use, and diet. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived through unconditional logistic regression.
Total alcohol intake was inversely associated with RCC in men and in women; the OR for the highest intake group (> or =22.3 g/day among men and > or =7.9 g/day among women) versus the non-drinkers was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5-0.9) for both sexes. Analysis of menopausal status produced ORs for the highest intake group versus the non-drinkers of 1.2 (95% CI, 0.7-2.1) among premenopausal women and 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4-0.9) among postmenopausal women. Smoking and obesity were not important effect modifiers.
Moderate alcohol consumption may be associated with a decreased risk of RCC in men and in women (mainly postmenopausal women).
PubMed ID
18420355 View in PubMed
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Alcohol involvement in snowmobile operator fatalities in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192579
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;92(5):359-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
D J Beirness
Author Affiliation
Taffic Injury Research Foundation of Canada, 171 Nepean Street, Suite 200, Ottawa, ON K2P 0B4. dougb@trafficinjuryresearch.com
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;92(5):359-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Off-Road Motor Vehicles - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
PubMed ID
11702489 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use trajectories and problem drinking over the course of adolescence: a study of north american indigenous youth and their caretakers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134622
Source
J Health Soc Behav. 2011 Jun;52(2):228-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Jacob E Cheadle
Les B Whitbeck
Author Affiliation
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA. j.e.cheade@gmail.com
Source
J Health Soc Behav. 2011 Jun;52(2):228-45
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
North America - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Risk assessment
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated the links between alcohol use trajectories and problem drinking (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition abuse/dependence) using five waves of data from 727 North American Indigenous adolescents between 10 and 17 years from eight reservations sharing a common language and culture. Growth mixture models linking fundamental causes, social stressors, support, and psychosocial pathways to problem drinking via alcohol use trajectories over the early life course were estimated. Results indicated that 20 percent of the adolescents began drinking at 11 to 12 years of age and that another 20 percent began drinking shortly thereafter. These early drinkers were at greatly elevated risk for problem drinking, as were those who began drinking at age 13. The etiological analysis revealed that stressors (e.g., perceived discrimination) directly and indirectly influenced early and problem alcohol use by decreasing positive school attitudes while increasing feelings of anger and perceived delinquent friendships. Girls were found to be at risk independently of these other factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21558489 View in PubMed
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317 records – page 1 of 32.