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12-month prevalence of depression among single and married mothers in the 1994 National Population Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200239
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Sep-Oct;90(5):320-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Cairney
C. Thorpe
J. Rietschlin
W R Avison
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Sep-Oct;90(5):320-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Marital status
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Single Parent - psychology
Abstract
While a number of studies have documented higher period prevalence rates of depression among single as compared to married mothers, all of the data have been based upon community surveys of mental illness. In Canada, all of the published work comes from Ontario. As a result, we do not know whether these results hold true for other regions of the country. Using a nationally representative sample, we find, consistent with previous work, that single mothers have almost double the 12-month prevalence rates of married mothers (15.4% versus 6.8%). As well, there are no significant differences in rates of depression between single and married mothers by region/province of the country. Our findings are compared with other epidemiologic data on the mental health of single mothers from Ontario.
PubMed ID
10570576 View in PubMed
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The 1993 General Social Survey I: alcohol use in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213881
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):397-401
Publication Type
Article
Author
E W Single
J M Brewster
P. MacNeil
J. Hatcher
C. Trainor
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):397-401
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Religion
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Rates and correlates of alcohol use are reported from the 1993 General Social Survey, a household telephone survey of 10,385 Canadians carried out by Statistics Canada. Continuing a recent trend, alcohol use has declined. The portrait of the Canadian who is most likely to drink and drink heavily is that of a young adult male who is not married, relatively well-off, and rarely or never attends religious services. In a multivariate analysis of the combined impact of sociodemographic factors on drinking and drinking levels, it was found that the frequency of religious attendance and age were the strongest predictors of current drinking. Gender was the strongest predictor of volume of alcohol consumption, while religious attendance, age, marital status and employment status were also significant predictors.
PubMed ID
8932479 View in PubMed
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The 1993 General Social Survey II: alcohol problems in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213880
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):402-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E W Single
J M Brewster
P. MacNeil
J. Hatcher
C. Trainor
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Nov-Dec;86(6):402-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Automobile Driving
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Quality of Life
Abstract
Rates and correlates of problems associated with the use of alcohol are reported from the 1993 General Social Survey in Canada. Approximately 1 in 11 drinkers (9.2%) reported that drinking has had an adverse effect on his or her social life, physical health, happiness, home life or marriage, work, or finances in the past year. The most commonly reported problems concerned physical health (5.1%), and financial position (4.7%). Approximately one in eight drinkers (12.9%) had driven a car within an hour after consuming two or more drinks in the previous year. Furthermore, more than two of every five respondents reported that they had experienced some problem due to other people's drinking. In a multivariate analysis, age, marital status, gender, religious attendance and employment status were the strongest predictors of problem drinking. The number of heavy drinking occasions is a stronger predictor of drinking problems than is overall level of consumption.
PubMed ID
8932480 View in PubMed
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Absence of sex differences in pharmacotherapy for acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179138
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jul;20(9):899-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Susan E Jelinski
William A Ghali
Gerry A Parsons
Colleen J Maxwell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jul;20(9):899-905
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Evaluation
Drug Therapy
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Patient Admission
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sex Factors
Urban health
Abstract
Previous studies have indicated that sex differences may exist in the pharmacological management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), with female patients being treated less aggressively.
To determine if previously reported sex differences in AMI medication use were also evident among all AMI patients treated at hospitals in an urban Canadian city.
All patients who had a primary discharge diagnosis of AMI from all three adult care hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, in the 1998/1999 fiscal year were identified from hospital administrative records (n=914). A standardized, detailed chart review was conducted. Information collected from the medical charts included sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular medication use during hospitalization and at discharge.
Similar proportions of female and male patients were treated with thrombolytics, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, nitrate, heparin, diuretics and digoxin. Among patients aged 75 years and over, a smaller proportion of female patients received acetylsalicylic acid in hospital than did male patients (87% versus 95%; P=0.026). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that, after correction for age, use of other anticoagulants/antiplatelets and death within 24 h of admission, sex was no longer an independent predictor for receipt of acetylsalicylic acid in hospital. Medications prescribed at discharge were similar between male and female patients.
The results from this Canadian chart review study, derived from detailed clinical data, indicate that the pattern of pharmacological treatment of female and male AMI patients during hospitalization and at discharge was very similar. No sex differences were evident in the treatment of AMI among patients treated in an urban Canadian centre.
PubMed ID
15266360 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection: prospective cohort study in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115630
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Apr;17(4):473-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
P W Colson
Y. Hirsch-Moverman
J. Bethel
P. Vempaty
K. Salcedo
K. Wall
W. Miranda
S. Collins
C R Horsburgh
Author Affiliation
Charles P Felton National Tuberculosis Center, International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA. pwc2@columbia.edu
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Apr;17(4):473-9
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Appointments and Schedules
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Latent Tuberculosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Refusal
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
An estimated 300?000 individuals are treated for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in the United States and Canada annually. Little is known about the proportion or characteristics of those who decline treatment.
To define the proportion of individuals in various groups who accept LTBI treatment and to identify factors associated with non-acceptance of treatment.
Persons offered LTBI treatment at 30 clinics in 12 Tuberculosis Epidemiologic Studies Consortium sites were prospectively enrolled. Multivariate regression models were constructed based on manual stepwise assessment of potential predictors.
Of 1692 participants enrolled from March 2007 to September 2008, 1515 (89.5%) accepted treatment and 177 (10.5%) declined. Predictors of acceptance included believing one could personally spread TB germs, having greater TB knowledge, finding clinic schedules convenient and having low acculturation. Predictors of non-acceptance included being a health care worker, being previously recommended for treatment and believing that taking medicines would be problematic.
This is the first prospective multisite study to examine predictors of LTBI treatment acceptance in general clinic populations. Greater efforts should be made to increase acceptance among health care workers, those previously recommended for treatment and those who expect problems with LTBI medicines. Ensuring convenient clinic schedules and TB education to increase knowledge could be important for ensuring acceptance.
PubMed ID
23485381 View in PubMed
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Access to care, health status, and health disparities in the United States and Canada: results of a cross-national population-based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169088
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Jul;96(7):1300-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Karen E Lasser
David U Himmelstein
Steffie Woolhandler
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, The Cambridge Health Alliance and Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Mass, USA. klasser@challiance.org
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Jul;96(7):1300-7
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - utilization
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Income
Life expectancy
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
National Health Programs - economics - standards - utilization
Patient Satisfaction - ethnology
Quality of Health Care
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Universal Coverage
Abstract
We compared health status, access to care, and utilization of medical services in the United States and Canada and compared disparities according to race, income, and immigrant status.
We analyzed population-based data on 3505 Canadian and 5183 US adults from the Joint Canada/US Survey of Health. Controlling for gender, age, income, race, and immigrant status, we used logistic regression to analyze country as a predictor of access to care, quality of care, and satisfaction with care and as a predictor of disparities in these measures.
In multivariate analyses, US respondents (compared with Canadians) were less likely to have a regular doctor, more likely to have unmet health needs, and more likely to forgo needed medicines. Disparities on the basis of race, income, and immigrant status were present in both countries but were more extreme in the United States.
United States residents are less able to access care than are Canadians. Universal coverage appears to reduce most disparities in access to care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16735628 View in PubMed
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Age-related differences in work injuries: a multivariate, population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174390
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2005 Jul;48(1):50-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
F Curtis Breslin
Peter Smith
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work & Health, 481 University Avenue, Ste. 800, Toronto M5G 2E9, Ontario, Canada. cbreslin@iwh.on.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2005 Jul;48(1):50-6
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Many population-based studies find that the rate of work injuries is higher among adolescent and young adult workers compared to older adults. The present study examines age-related differences in work injuries, with an emphasis on adjusting for the potential confounding effects of job characteristics.
Age-related differences in work injuries were examined in a representative sample of 56,510 working Canadians aged 15 years and over. Respondents reported work-related injuries and job characteristics (e.g., occupation) in the past 12 months. Total hours worked in the past year were computed for each worker and accounted for in the logistic regressions. Analyses were stratified by gender.
For men, adjusting for job characteristics substantially reduced, but did not eliminate the elevated risk status of adolescent and young adult workers. For women, only young adult women showed an elevated risk of work injury with job characteristics controlled.
This is one of the few multivariate studies specifically examining contributors to age-related differences in work injuries in a population-based sample of workers. The substantial reduction in age-work injury association in the fully adjusted model suggests that differences in the types of jobs young workers hold play a critical role in their high-risk status.
PubMed ID
15940721 View in PubMed
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Albuminuria in chronic heart failure: prevalence and prognostic importance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149102
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 15;374(9689):543-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2009
Author
Colette E Jackson
Scott D Solomon
Hertzel C Gerstein
Sofia Zetterstrand
Bertil Olofsson
Eric L Michelson
Christopher B Granger
Karl Swedberg
Marc A Pfeffer
Salim Yusuf
John J V McMurray
Author Affiliation
British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 15;374(9689):543-50
Date
Aug-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Albuminuria - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Benzimidazoles - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Creatinine - metabolism
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Heart Failure - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Stroke Volume
Tetrazoles - therapeutic use
United States - epidemiology
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
Increased excretion of albumin in urine might be a marker of the various pathophysiological changes that arise in patients with heart failure. Therefore our aim was to assess the prevalence and prognostic value of a spot urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) in patients with heart failure.
UACR was measured at baseline and during follow-up of 2310 patients in the Candesartan in Heart failure: Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM) Programme. The prevalence of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, and the predictive value of UACR for the primary composite outcome of each CHARM study--ie, death from cardiovascular causes or admission to hospital with worsening heart failure--and death from any cause were assessed.
1349 (58%) patients had a normal UACR, 704 (30%) had microalbuminuria, and 257 (11%) had macroalbuminuria. The prevalence of increased UACR was similar in patients with reduced and preserved left ventricular ejection fractions. Patients with an increased UACR were older, had more cardiovascular comorbidity, worse renal function, and a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus than did those with normoalbuminuria. However, a high prevalence of increased UACR was still noted among patients without diabetes, hypertension, or renal dysfunction. Elevated UACR was associated with increased risk of the composite outcome and death even after adjustment for other prognostic variables including renal function, diabetes, and haemoglobin A1c. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for the composite outcome in patients with microalbuminuria versus normoalbuminuria was 1.43 (95% CI 1.21-1.69; p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Aug 15;374(9689):506-819683628
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Oct 24;374(9699):1421-219854371
PubMed ID
19683640 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-induced memory blackouts as an indicator of injury risk among college drinkers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133405
Source
Inj Prev. 2012 Feb;18(1):44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Marlon P Mundt
Larissa I Zakletskaia
David D Brown
Michael F Fleming
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. marlon.mundt@fammed.wisc.edu
Source
Inj Prev. 2012 Feb;18(1):44-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Amnesia - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
An alcohol-induced memory blackout represents an amnesia to recall events but does not involve a loss of consciousness. Memory blackouts are a common occurrence among college drinkers, but it is not clear if a history of memory blackouts is predictive of future alcohol-related injury above and beyond the risk associated with heavy drinking episodes.
To determine whether baseline memory blackouts can prospectively identify college students with alcohol-related injury in the next 24 months after controlling for heavy drinking days.
Data were analysed from the College Health Intervention Project Study (CHIPS), a randomised controlled trial of screening and brief physician intervention for problem alcohol use among 796 undergraduate and 158 graduate students at four university sites in the USA and one in Canada, conducted from 2004 to 2009. Multivariate analyses used generalised estimating equations with the logit link.
The overall 24-month alcohol-related injury rate was 25.6%, with no significant difference between men and women (p=0.51). Alcohol-induced memory blackouts at baseline exhibited a significant dose-response on odds of alcohol-related injury during follow-up, increasing from 1.57 (95% CI 1.13 to 2.19) for subjects reporting 1-2 memory blackouts at baseline to 2.64 (95% CI 1.65 to 4.21) for students acknowledging 6+ memory blackouts at baseline. The link between memory blackouts and injury was mediated by younger age, prior alcohol-related injury, heavy drinking, and sensation-seeking disposition.
Memory blackouts are a significant predictor of future alcohol-related injury among college drinkers after adjusting for heavy drinking episodes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21708813 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related victimization among young adult Canadian drinkers: the explanatory roles of hazardous drinking and illicit drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152233
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):55-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Samantha L Wells
Jennie Mae Thompson
Author Affiliation
Social Prevention and Health Policy Research Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 100 Collip Circle, Suite 200, London, ON N6G 4X8. swells@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):55-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Population Surveillance
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Consistent evidence has shown that young people are significantly overrepresented among victims of violence due to another person's drinking. Yet little research has examined factors that explain alcohol-related victimization among young adults, particularly in Canada. The present study examines the influence of hazardous drinking and illicit drug use on the likelihood of experiencing alcohol-related physical victimization among young adult drinkers in a Canadian general population sample and determines whether gender differences exist in the roles of these explanatory variables.
A secondary analysis of the 2004 Canadian Addiction Survey (CAS) was conducted, restricting analyses to young adult (ages 18 to 25) drinkers (785 females, 745 males). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine associations between explanatory variables and victimization. To assess gender differences in effects, interaction effects of gender by hazardous drinking and illicit drug use were tested.
Alcohol-related victimization was more likely among men than among women, hazardous drinkers than non-hazardous drinkers, and illicit drug users than non-users. Multivariate analyses indicated that, among women, illicit drug use was associated with victimization whereas, among men, hazardous drinking was significant. An interaction effect between gender and hazardous drinking indicated that hazardous drinking was more strongly associated with victimization among men than among women.
These results highlight the important role of substance use in explaining alcohol-related victimization among young adult Canadian drinkers and suggest that gender-specific prevention programs may be needed.
PubMed ID
19263985 View in PubMed
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246 records – page 1 of 25.