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7-year stability of blood pressure in the Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197147
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Oct;31(4):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
P T Katzmarzyk
T. Rankinen
L. Pérusse
R M Malina
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, North York, Ontario, Canada M3J IP3. katzmarz@yorku.ca
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Oct;31(4):403-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aging - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to examine the 7-year stability of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures in the Canadian population.
The sample included 1,503 participants 7-69 years of age from the 1981 Canada Fitness Survey who were remeasured in Campbell's Survey of 1988. Both SBP and DBP were adjusted for the effects of body mass index (BMI) using regression procedures.
Interage correlations from baseline to follow-up ranged from -0.17 to 0.61 for SBP and from -0.22 to 0. 51 for DBP. With few exceptions, correlations were positive and significant, and were highest and most consistent in adulthood. Further, between 27 and 39% of participants in the upper or lower quintiles in 1981 remained there in 1988. There were few differences in adiposity between those who remained in the upper or lower quintiles and those who did not. One exception was that males who remained in the upper quintile of SBP had greater values for BMI, sum of skinfolds, and waist circumference at baseline. Among adults, the best predictor of future blood pressure was baseline blood pressure, which accounted for between 12 and 34% of the variance in follow-up blood pressure, followed by age, follow-up BMI, and, in females, baseline physical activity levels.
Blood pressure demonstrated low to moderate stability over 7 years in Canada, and baseline level of adiposity was related to the stability of SBP in males.
PubMed ID
11006066 View in PubMed
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20 years or more of follow-up of living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222923
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1992
Author
J S Najarian
B M Chavers
L E McHugh
A J Matas
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Date
Oct-3-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Kidney - physiology
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Proteinuria - etiology
Pulmonary Embolism - mortality
Tissue Donors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The perioperative and long-term risks for living kidney donors are of concern. We have studied donors at the University of Minnesota 20 years or more (mean 23.7) after donation by comparing renal function, blood pressure, and proteinuria in donors with siblings. In 57 donors (mean age 61 [SE 1]), mean serum creatinine is 1.1 (0.01) mg/dl, blood urea nitrogen 17 (0.5) mg/dl, creatinine clearance 82 (2) ml/min, and blood pressure 134 (2)/80 (1) mm Hg. 32% of the donors are taking antihypertensive drugs and 23% have proteinuria. The 65 siblings (mean age 58 [1.3]) do not significantly differ from the donors in any of these variables: 1.1 (0.03) mg/dl, 17 (1.2) mg/dl, 89 (3.3) ml/min, and 130 (3)/80 (1.5) mm Hg, respectively. 44% of the siblings are taking antihypertensives and 22% have proteinuria. To assess perioperative mortality, we surveyed all members of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons about donor mortality at their institutions. We documented 17 perioperative deaths in the USA and Canada after living donation, and estimate mortality to be 0.03%. We conclude that perioperative mortality in the USA and Canada after living-donor nephrectomy is low. In long-term follow-up of our living donors, we found no evidence of progressive renal deterioration or other serious disorders.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1992 Nov 28;340(8831):1354-51360068
PubMed ID
1357243 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal birth cohort (ABC): a prospective cohort study of early life determinants of adiposity and associated risk factors among Aboriginal people in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112767
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:608
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Gita Wahi
Julie Wilson
Ruby Miller
Rebecca Anglin
Sarah McDonald
Katherine M Morrison
Koon K Teo
Sonia S Anand
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:608
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - ethnology
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Aboriginal people living in Canada have a high prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). To better understand the pre and postnatal influences on the development of adiposity and related cardio-metabolic factors in adult Aboriginal people, we will recruit and follow prospectively Aboriginal pregnant mothers and their children - the Aboriginal Birth Cohort (ABC) study.
We aim to recruit 300 Aboriginal pregnant mothers and their newborns from the Six Nations Reserve, and follow them prospectively to age 3 years. Key details of environment and health including maternal nutrition, glucose tolerance, physical activity, and weight gain will be collected. At birth, cord blood and placenta samples will be collected, as well as newborn anthropometric measurements. Mothers and offspring will be followed annually with serial measurements of diet and physical activity, growth trajectory, and adiposity.
There is an urgent need to understand maternal and child factors that underlie the early development of adiposity and type 2 diabetes in Aboriginal people. The information generated from this cohort will assist the Six Nations community in developing interventions to prevent early adiposity in Aboriginal children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23800270 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal users of Canadian quitlines: an exploratory analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160066
Source
Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i60-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Lynda M Hayward
H Sharon Campbell
Carol Sutherland-Brown
Author Affiliation
Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, Lyle S Hallman Institute, Room 1717A, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1. lhayward@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i60-4
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Counseling - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hotlines - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Patient satisfaction
Smoking - ethnology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To conduct an exploratory, comparative study of the utilisation and effectiveness of tobacco cessation quitlines among aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadian smokers.
Population based quitlines that provide free cessation information, advice and counselling to Canadian smokers.
First time quitline callers, age 18 years of age and over, who called the quitline between August 2001 and December 2005 and who completed the evaluation and provided data on their ethnic status (n = 7082).
Demographic characteristics and tobacco behaviours of participants at intake and follow-up; reasons for calling; actions taken toward quitting, and 6-month follow-up quit rates.
7% of evaluation participants in the time period reported aboriginal origins. Aboriginal participants were younger than non-aboriginals but had similar smoking status and level of addiction at intake. Concern about future health and current health problems were the most common reasons aboriginal participants called. Six months after intake aboriginals and non-aboriginals had taken similar actions with 57% making a 24-hour quit attempt. Quit rates were higher for aboriginals than non-aboriginals, particularly for men. The 6-month prolonged abstinence rate for aboriginal men was 16.7% compared with 7.2% for aboriginal women and 9.4% and 8.3% for non-aboriginal men and women, respectively.
This exploratory analysis showed that even without targeted promotion, aboriginal smokers do call Canadian quitlines, primarily for health related reasons. We also showed that the quitlines are effective at helping them to quit. As a population focused intervention, quitlines can reach a large proportion of smokers in a cost efficient manner. In aboriginal communities where smoking rates exceed 50% and multiple health risks and chronic diseases already exist, eliminating non-ceremonial tobacco use must be a priority. Our results, although exploratory, suggest quitlines can be an effective addition to aboriginal tobacco cessation strategies.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Oct 3;347(14):1087-9312362011
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Feb;5(1):13-2512745503
Cites: Br J Addict. 1991 Sep;86(9):1119-271932883
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Cites: Am J Public Health. 1999 Sep;89(9):1322-710474547
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Cites: Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i16-2018048624
Cites: Health Rep. 1992;4(1):7-241391655
PubMed ID
18048634 View in PubMed
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Absence of radiographic asbestosis and the risk of lung cancer among asbestos-cement workers: Extended follow-up of a cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141822
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Nov;53(11):1065-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Murray M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. murray.finkelstein@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Nov;53(11):1065-9
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - toxicity
Asbestosis - mortality - radiography
Canada - epidemiology
Construction Materials - toxicity
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Risk
Smoking
Time Factors
Abstract
It has been a matter of controversy whether there is an increased risk of lung cancer among asbestos-exposed workers without radiographic asbestosis. A previous study of lung cancer risk among asbestos-cement workers has been updated with an additional 12 years of follow-up.
Subjects had received radiographic examination at 20 and 25 years from first exposure to asbestos. Radiographs were interpreted by a single National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified B-reader using the 1971 International Labor Office (ILO) Classification of the pneumoconioses as reference standard. Asbestosis was defined as an ILO coding of 1/0 or higher. Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) were calculated using the general population of Ontario as reference.
Among asbestos-cement workers without radiographic asbestosis at 20 years latency the lung cancer SMR was 3.84 (2.24-6.14). Among workers without asbestosis when examined at 25 years latency the SMR was 3.69 (1.59-7.26).
Workers from an Ontario asbestos-cement factory who did not have radiographic asbestosis at 20 or 25 years from first exposure to asbestos continued to have an increased risk of death from lung cancer during an additional 12 years of follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Ind Med. 2011 Jun;54(6):495-6; author reply 497-821328422
PubMed ID
20672325 View in PubMed
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[A clinic for prevention of progression of kidney failure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164390
Source
J Ren Care. 2006 Jul-Sep;32(3):153-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Brousseau
Author Affiliation
Centre Hospitalier Ambulatoire Régionale de Laval, Québec, Kanada. abrousse_charl@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
J Ren Care. 2006 Jul-Sep;32(3):153-6
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - diagnosis - prevention & control
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - prevention & control
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Patient care team
Patient Education as Topic
Peritoneal dialysis
Primary Prevention
Quebec
Renal Dialysis
Smoking Cessation
Time Factors
Abstract
Prevention in nephrology is only possible with the cooperation of patients and their families. The nurse plays a considerable role in working with patients and is a major player in the team, responsible for follow-up of the patient, where the earliest interventions can help delay and sometimes avoid dialysis. The hypertension clinic is the beginning of a continuum until dialysis. This paper describes three clinics that are managed in the renal service and indicates how they contribute to offering optimal care to a renal population.
PubMed ID
17393810 View in PubMed
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Adipokines and incident type 2 diabetes in an Aboriginal Canadian [corrected] population: the Sandy Lake Health and Diabetes Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93453
Source
Diabetes Care. 2008 Jul;31(7):1410-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Ley Sylvia H
Harris Stewart B
Connelly Philip W
Mamakeesick Mary
Gittelsohn Joel
Hegele Robert A
Retnakaran Ravi
Zinman Bernard
Hanley Anthony J G
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2008 Jul;31(7):1410-5
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipokines - blood
Adult
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Canada - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Insulin Resistance
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Leptin - blood
Male
Obesity - complications
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate associations of adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, and serum amyloid A (SAA), individually or in combinations, with risk of incident type 2 diabetes in a Aboriginal Canadian [corrected] population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Of the 606 Sandy Lake Health and Diabetes Project cohort subjects who were free of diabetes at baseline, 540 (89.1%) participated in 10-year follow-up assessments. Concentrations of fasting adiponectin, leptin, CRP, IL-6, SAA, and covariates were measured at baseline. Fasting glucose and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test were obtained at baseline and follow-up to determine incident type 2 diabetes, defined as clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes or as fasting plasma glucose > or =7.0 mmol/l or 2-h postload plasma glucose > or =11.1 mmol/l at follow-up. RESULTS: Low adiponectin, high leptin, and low adiponectin-to-leptin ratio at baseline were associated with increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes after adjustment for age, sex, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, hypertension, and impaired glucose tolerance (odds ratio 0.63 [95% CI 0.48-0.83], 1.50 [1.02-2.21], and 0.54 [0.37-0.77], respectively). When the models were additionally adjusted for waist circumference or BMI, however, only low adiponectin remained significantly associated with increased incident diabetes (0.68 [0.51-0.90]). Combinations of leptin, CRP, IL-6, and/or SAA with adiponectin, assessed using either the ratio or joint effects, did not improve diabetes prediction. CONCLUSIONS: Low baseline adiponectin is associated with increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes independent of leptin, CRP, IL-6, SAA, and metabolic syndrome variables including obesity.
Notes
Erratum In: Diabetes Care. 2008 Aug;31(8):1713
PubMed ID
18339973 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, adipose tissue distribution and mortality rates in the Canada Fitness Survey follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189366
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Aug;26(8):1054-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
P T Katzmarzyk
C L Craig
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. katzmarz@yorku.ca
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Aug;26(8):1054-9
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - etiology - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
To compare mortality rates across indicators of adiposity and relative adipose tissue distribution in the Canadian population.
The sample included 10,323 adult participants 20-69 y of age from the Canada Fitness Survey who were monitored for all-cause mortality over 13 y.
BMI, waist circumference (WC) and the sum of five skinfolds (SF5) were indicators of adiposity, and the first principal component of skinfold residuals (PC1) represented subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative mortality risk from mortality rates across levels of adiposity and adipose tissue distribution, controlling for the confounding effects of age, smoking status and alcohol consumption.
:Significant curvilinear (J-shaped) relationships in men and linear relationships in women were observed between BMI, WC and SF5 and all-cause mortality rates. PC1 was not related to mortality rates in either men or women. In women, the inclusion of the other indicators of adiposity and adipose tissue distribution did not significantly add to the prediction of mortality rates beyond BMI; however, combinations of BMI and both WC and SF5 produced significant models in men.
The results support the hypothesis that overall level of adiposity is an important predictor of all-cause mortality, more so than the relative distribution of subcutaneous body fat, once overall level of body fatness has been accounted for.
PubMed ID
12119570 View in PubMed
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Adjuvant chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: practice patterns and outcomes in the general population of Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127316
Source
J Thorac Oncol. 2012 Mar;7(3):559-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Christopher M Booth
Frances A Shepherd
Yingwei Peng
Gail Darling
Gavin Li
Weidong Kong
William J Mackillop
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen's University Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Canada. boothc@kgh.kari.net
Source
J Thorac Oncol. 2012 Mar;7(3):559-66
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Carboplatin - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Large Cell - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Cisplatin - administration & dosage
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Physician's Practice Patterns
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Vinblastine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Young Adult
Abstract
Adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) is known to improve survival in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Herein, we describe chemotherapy regimens used, dose modifications, survival, and treatment-related toxicity in the general population.
All cases of non-small cell lung cancer diagnosed in Ontario in the period 2004-2006 who underwent surgical resection (n = 3354) were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry in this population-based retrospective cohort study. We linked electronic records of treatment to the registry to identify all cases treated with ACT (n = 1032) and describe drugs, regimens, and dosages delivered. As a proxy measure of ACT-related toxicity, we evaluated deaths and hospitalizations within 16 weeks of starting ACT. Factors associated with dose modification were evaluated by logistic regression. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to describe associations between patient-, disease-, and treatment-related factors and survival.
ACT regimens were identified for 584 of 1032 ACT cases. Almost all cases included cisplatin- or carboplatin-based regimens (478/584, 82%, and 99/584, 17%, respectively). The most common regimen was a vinroelbine/cisplatin doublet (412/584, 71%); 64% of these cases had a dose reduction or omission. Dose modification was not associated with inferior survival on multivariate analysis. Twelve percent of all ACT cases were admitted to hospital within 16 weeks of starting ACT, and there was a 1.6% death rate potentially attributable to ACT. Survival of all ACT cases was comparable with outcomes reported in clinical trials.
ACT regimens used, toxicity, and survival outcomes in the general population are comparable with those reported in clinical trials. Dose modifications used in clinical practice are not associated with inferior survival.
PubMed ID
22307012 View in PubMed
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Adverse events temporally associated with immunizing agents--1991 report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220046
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1993 Oct 30;19(20):168-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1993

426 records – page 1 of 43.