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1,3-Butadiene: exposure estimation, hazard characterization, and exposure-response analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186649
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Hughes
M E Meek
M. Walker
R. Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
Existing Substances Division, Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Environmental Health Centre, Tunney's Pasture PL0802B1, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Butadienes - metabolism - toxicity
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens, Environmental - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Mutagens - toxicity
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
1,3-Butadiene has been assessed as a Priority Substance under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The general population in Canada is exposed to 1,3-butadiene primarily through ambient air. Inhaled 1,3-butadiene is carcinogenic in both mice and rats, inducing tumors at multiple sites at all concentrations tested in all identified studies. In addition, 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in both somatic and germ cells of rodents. It also induces adverse effects in the reproductive organs of female mice at relatively low concentrations. The greater sensitivity in mice than in rats to induction of these effects by 1,3-butadiene is likely related to species differences in metabolism to active epoxide metabolites. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene in the occupational environment has been associated with the induction of leukemia; there is also some limited evidence that 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in exposed workers. Therefore, in view of the weight of evidence of available epidemiological and toxicological data, 1,3-butadiene is considered highly likely to be carcinogenic, and likely to be genotoxic, in humans. Estimates of the potency of butadiene to induce cancer have been derived on the basis of both epidemiological investigation and bioassays in mice and rats. Potencies to induce ovarian effects have been estimated on the basis of studies in mice. Uncertainties have been delineated, and, while there are clear species differences in metabolism, estimates of potency to induce effects are considered justifiably conservative in view of the likely variability in metabolism across the population related to genetic polymorphism for enzymes for the critical metabolic pathway.
PubMed ID
12587254 View in PubMed
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99th Dahlem conference on infection, inflammation and chronic inflammatory disorders: immune therapies of type 1 diabetes: new opportunities based on the hygiene hypothesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144028
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2010 Apr;160(1):106-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
L. Chatenoud
S. You
H. Okada
C. Kuhn
B. Michaud
J-F Bach
Author Affiliation
Université Paris Descarte, Paris, France. lucienne.chatenoud@inserm.fr
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2010 Apr;160(1):106-12
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Autoantigens - immunology
Bacteria - immunology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - immunology - therapy
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Hygiene
Hypersensitivity - immunology
Immunosuppression - methods
Immunotherapy - methods
Infection - immunology - microbiology
Mice
Pancreatitis - immunology - microbiology
Toll-Like Receptors - agonists
Young Adult
Abstract
Insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes is a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease resulting from the selective destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells within pancreatic islets of Langerhans by an immune-mediated inflammation involving autoreactive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes which infiltrate pancreatic islets. Current treatment is substitutive, i.e. chronic use of exogenous insulin which, in spite of significant advances, is still associated with major constraints (multiple daily injections, risks of hypoglycaemia) and lack of effectiveness over the long term in preventing severe degenerative complications. Finding a cure for autoimmune diabetes by establishing effective immune-based therapies is a real medical health challenge, as the disease incidence increases steadily in industrialized countries. As the disease affects mainly children and young adults, any candidate immune therapy must therefore be safe and avoid a sustained depression of immune responses with the attendant problems of recurrent infection and drug toxicity. Thus, inducing or restoring immune tolerance to target autoantigens, controlling the pathogenic response while preserving the host reactivity to exogenous/unrelated antigens, appears to be the ideal approach. Our objective is to review the major progress accomplished over the last 20 years towards that aim. In addition, we would like to present another interesting possibility to access new preventive strategies based on the 'hygiene hypothesis', which proposes a causal link between the increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases, including diabetes, and the decrease of the infectious burden. The underlying rationale is to identify microbial-derived compounds mediating the protective activity of infections which could be developed therapeutically.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20415859 View in PubMed
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African pygmy hedgehog--associated Salmonella tilene in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206677
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1997 Sep 1;23(17):129-31; discussion 131-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1997

Air pollution as a cause of heart disease. Time for action.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191008
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Mar 20;39(6):943-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2002
Author
Stanton A Glantz
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Mar 20;39(6):943-5
Date
Mar-20-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Environmental health
Heart Diseases - chemically induced
Humans
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Mar 20;39(6):935-4211897432
PubMed ID
11897433 View in PubMed
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Animal-related occupations and the risk of leukemia, myeloma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188838
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Aug;13(6):563-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Lin Fritschi
Kenneth C Johnson
Erich V Kliewer
Rick Fry
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia. linf@dph.uwa.edu.au
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Aug;13(6):563-71
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Logistic Models
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology - etiology
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
There is some evidence to suggest that workers in animal-related occupations are at increased risk of developing lymphohematopoietic cancers. This study aimed to examine the risk of leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and multiple myeloma associated with occupational exposure to animals.
We used data from a multi-site, population-based case-control study using mailed questionnaires which had taken place in eight of ten Canadian provinces, during 1994-1998. There were 1023 leukemia cases, 1577 NHL cases, and 324 multiple myeloma cases (all histologically confirmed) and 4688 population-based controls. Animal-related occupations were identified from a lifetime occupational history. Subjects in animal-related jobs were compared with others using logistic regression for the risk of leukemia, NHL, and multiple myeloma.
Compared to subjects without occupational exposure to animals, occupational exposure to beef cattle increased the risks of leukemia (odds ratio (OR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.3) and NHL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.9). No other animal exposure was consistently associated with risk of lymphohematopoietic cancer. An unexpected protective association was observed between work as a fisherman and leukemia (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8) and NHL (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9).
This population-based case-control study found that those individuals working in occupations associated with beef cattle are at increased risk for developing leukemia and lymphoma while those working in occupations requiring the handling of fish are at decreased risk of leukemia and lymphoma.
PubMed ID
12195646 View in PubMed
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An investigation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in people and pets in the same household with an infected person or infected pet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148824
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2009 Sep 1;235(5):540-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2009
Author
Meredith C Faires
Kathy C Tater
J Scott Weese
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
Source
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2009 Sep 1;235(5):540-3
Date
Sep-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Canada - epidemiology
Carrier state
Cat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Cross Infection
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Dogs
Family Characteristics
Humans
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
United States - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
To investigate the prevalence of concurrent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in people and pets in the same household with a person or pet with an MRSA infection and to compare MRSA isolates by use of molecular techniques.
2 cross-sectional evaluations conducted concurrently.
24 dogs, 10 cats, and 56 humans in part 1 and 21 dogs, 4 cats, and 16 humans in part 2 of the study.
In both parts of the study, nasal swab specimens were collected from humans and nasal and rectal swab specimens were collected from household pets. Selective culture for MRSA was performed, and isolates were typed via pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and spa typing. Households were defined as positive when MRSA was isolated from at least 1 person (part 1) or 1 pet (part 2).
In part 1, 6 of 22 (27.3%) households were identified with MRSA colonization in a person. In these households, 10 of 56 (17.9%) humans, 2 of 24 (8.3%) dogs, and 1 of 10 (10%) cats were colonized with MRSA. In part 2, only 1 of 8 households was identified with MRSA colonization in a pet. Most MRSA isolates obtained from humans and pets in the same household were indistinguishable by use of PFGE.
The high prevalence of concurrent MRSA colonization as well as identification of indistinguishable strains in humans and pet dogs and cats in the same household suggested that interspecies transmission of MRSA is possible. Longitudinal studies are required to identify factors associated with interspecies transmission.
PubMed ID
19719444 View in PubMed
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243 records – page 1 of 25.