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Determinants of tuberculosis trends in six Indigenous populations of the USA, Canada, and Greenland from 1960 to 2014: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298373
Source
Lancet Public Health. 2018 03; 3(3):e133-e142
Publication Type
Article
Date
03-2018
Author
Kianoush Dehghani
Zhiyi Lan
Peizhi Li
Sascha Wilk Michelsen
Sean Waites
Andrea Benedetti
Pierre Lejeune
Jill Torrie
Elizabeth Robinson
Berenica Vejvoda
Muhammad Mullah
Diana Redwood
Michael Cooper
Anne Fanning
Wadieh Yacoub
Gonzalo G Alvarez
Bolette Søborg
Richard Long
Dick Menzies
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; Public Health Department of the Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay, Montreal, QC, Canada. Electronic address: kianoush.dehghani@mcgill.ca.
Source
Lancet Public Health. 2018 03; 3(3):e133-e142
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska Natives - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Risk factors
Tuberculosis - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Tuberculosis continues to disproportionately affect many Indigenous populations in the USA, Canada, and Greenland. We aimed to investigate whether population-based tuberculosis-specific interventions or changes in general health and socioeconomic indicators, or a combination of these factors, were associated with changes in tuberculosis incidence in these Indigenous populations.
For this population-based study we examined annual tuberculosis notification rates between 1960 and 2014 in six Indigenous populations of the USA, Canada, and Greenland (Inuit [Greenland], American Indian and Alaska Native [Alaska, USA], First Nations [Alberta, Canada], Cree of Eeyou Istchee [Quebec, Canada], Inuit of Nunavik [Quebec, Canada], and Inuit of Nunavut [Canada]), as well as the general population of Canada. We used mixed-model linear regression to estimate the association of these rates with population-wide interventions of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination of infants, radiographic screening, or testing and treatment for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and with other health and socioeconomic indicators including life expectancy, infant mortality, diabetes, obesity, smoking, alcohol use, crowded housing, employment, education, and health expenditures.
Tuberculosis notification rates declined rapidly in all six Indigenous populations between 1960 and 1980, with continued decline in Indigenous populations in Alberta, Alaska, and Eeyou Istchee thereafter but recrudescence in Inuit populations of Nunavut, Nunavik, and Greenland. Annual percentage reductions in tuberculosis incidence were significantly associated with two tuberculosis control interventions, relative to no intervention, and after adjustment for infant mortality and smoking: BCG vaccination (-11%, 95% CI -6 to -17) and LTBI screening and treatment (-10%, -3 to -18). Adjusted associations were not significant for chest radiographic screening (-1%, 95% CI -7 to 5). Declining tuberculosis notification rates were significantly associated with increased life expectancy (-37·8 [95% CI -41·7 to -33·9] fewer cases per 100?000 for each 1-year increase) and decreased infant mortality (-9·0 [-9·5 to -8·6] fewer cases per 100?000 for each death averted per 1000 livebirths) in all six Indigenous populations, but no significant associations were observed for other health and socioeconomic indicators examined.
Population-based BCG vaccination of infants and LTBI screening and treatment were associated with significant decreases in tuberculosis notification rates in these Indigenous populations. These interventions should be reinforced in populations still affected by tuberculosis, while also addressing the persistent health and socioeconomic disparities.
Public Health Department of the Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay.
Notes
CommentIn: Lancet Public Health. 2018 Mar;3(3):e105-e106 PMID 29426598
PubMed ID
29426597 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of obesity and its metabolic correlates among the circumpolar Inuit in 3 countries

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78624
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2007 Apr;97(4):691-695
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
  1 website  
Author
Young, TK
Bjerregaard, P
Dewailly, E
Risica, PM
Jørgensen, ME
Ebbesson, SEO
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. kue.young@utoronto.ca
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2007 Apr;97(4):691-695
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We investigated the prevalence of obesity and the metabolic correlates of different levels of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference among the Inuit in 3 countries. METHODS: Data from 4 surveys of Inuit in Canada, Greenland, and Alaska conducted during 1990-2001 were pooled, with a total sample size of 2545 participants. These data were compared with data from a Canadian population of predominantly European origin. RESULTS: Using the World Health Organization criteria for overweight and obesity, we found that the crude prevalence of overweight among Inuit men and women was 36.6% and 32.5%, respectively, and obesity was 15.8% and 25.5%, respectively. Inuit prevalences were similar to those of the highly developed countries of Europe and North America. As levels of obesity increased, as measured by BMI or waist circumference, the mean values of various metabolic indicators-lipid, glucose, and insulin levels and blood pressure-also increased. However, at each level of BMI or waist circumference, the Inuit had lower blood pressure and lipid levels than did Euro-Canadians. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that universal criteria for obesity may not reflect the same degree of metabolic risk for populations such as the Inuit and suggest that ethnic-specific criteria are needed.
PubMed ID
17329661 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Tradition and transition: parasitic zoonoses of people and animals in Alaska, northern Canada, and Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115065
Source
Adv Parasitol. 2013;82:33-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Emily J Jenkins
Louisa J Castrodale
Simone J C de Rosemond
Brent R Dixon
Stacey A Elmore
Karen M Gesy
Eric P Hoberg
Lydden Polley
Janna M Schurer
Manon Simard
R C Andrew Thompson
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada. emily.jenkins@usask.ca
Source
Adv Parasitol. 2013;82:33-204
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - epidemiology - parasitology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infection Control - methods
Parasites - classification - isolation & purification
Parasitic Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Prevalence
Zoonoses - epidemiology - parasitology
Abstract
Zoonotic parasites are important causes of endemic and emerging human disease in northern North America and Greenland (the North), where prevalence of some parasites is higher than in the general North American population. The North today is in transition, facing increased resource extraction, globalisation of trade and travel, and rapid and accelerating environmental change. This comprehensive review addresses the diversity, distribution, ecology, epidemiology, and significance of nine zoonotic parasites in animal and human populations in the North. Based on a qualitative risk assessment with criteria heavily weighted for human health, these zoonotic parasites are ranked, in the order of decreasing importance, as follows: Echinococcus multilocularis, Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella and Giardia, Echinococcus granulosus/canadensis and Cryptosporidium, Toxocara, anisakid nematodes, and diphyllobothriid cestodes. Recent and future trends in the importance of these parasites for human health in the North are explored. For example, the incidence of human exposure to endemic helminth zoonoses (e.g. Diphyllobothrium, Trichinella, and Echinococcus) appears to be declining, while water-borne protozoans such as Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Toxoplasma may be emerging causes of human disease in a warming North. Parasites that undergo temperature-dependent development in the environment (such as Toxoplasma, ascarid and anisakid nematodes, and diphyllobothriid cestodes) will likely undergo accelerated development in endemic areas and temperate-adapted strains/species will move north, resulting in faunal shifts. Food-borne pathogens (e.g. Trichinella, Toxoplasma, anisakid nematodes, and diphyllobothriid cestodes) may be increasingly important as animal products are exported from the North and tourists, workers, and domestic animals enter the North. Finally, key needs are identified to better assess and mitigate risks associated with zoonotic parasites, including enhanced surveillance in animals and people, detection methods, and delivery and evaluation of veterinary and public health services.
PubMed ID
23548085 View in PubMed
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