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A 15-month evaluation of the effects of repeated subgingival minocycline in chronic adult periodontitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201582
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
D. van Steenberghe
B. Rosling
P O Söder
R G Landry
U. van der Velden
M F Timmerman
E F McCarthy
G. Vandenhoven
C. Wouters
M. Wilson
J. Matthews
H N Newman
Author Affiliation
Catholic University, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - drug effects
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Campylobacter - drug effects
Canada
Chronic Disease
Colony Count, Microbial
Dental Plaque Index
Dental Scaling
Double-Blind Method
Eikenella corrodens - drug effects
Europe
Female
Fusobacterium nucleatum - drug effects
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Minocycline - administration & dosage
Ointments
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - drug therapy - microbiology
Periodontitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - drug effects
Prevotella intermedia - drug effects
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Treponema - drug effects
Abstract
A double-blind, randomized, parallel, comparative study was designed to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of subgingivally administered minocycline ointment versus a vehicle control.
One hundred four patients (104) with moderate to severe adult periodontitis (34 to 64 years of age; mean 46 years) were enrolled in the study. Following scaling and root planing, patients were randomized to receive either 2% minocycline ointment or a matched vehicle control. Study medication was administered directly into the periodontal pocket with a specially designed, graduated, disposable applicator at baseline; week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12. Scaling and root planing was repeated at months 6 and 12. Standard clinical variables (including probing depth and attachment level) were evaluated at baseline and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15. Microbiological sampling using DNA probes was done at baseline; at week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15.
Both treatment groups showed significant and clinically relevant reductions in the numbers of each of the 7 microorganisms measured during the entire 15-month study period. When differences were detected, sites treated with minocycline ointment always produced statistically significantly greater reductions than sites which received the vehicle control. For initial pockets > or =5 mm, a mean reduction in probing depth of 1.9 mm was seen in the test sites, versus 1.2 mm in the control sites. Sites with a baseline probing depth > or =7 mm and bleeding index >2 showed an average of 2.5 mm reduction with minocycline versus 1.5 mm with the vehicle. Gains in attachment (0.9 mm and 1.1 mm) were observed in minocycline-treated sites, with baseline probing depth > or =5 mm and > or =7 mm, respectively, compared with 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm gain at control sites. Subgingival administration of minocycline ointment was well tolerated.
Overall, the results demonstrate that repeated subgingival administration of minocycline ointment in the treatment of adult periodontitis is safe and leads to significant adjunctive improvement after subgingival instrumentation in both clinical and microbiologic variables over a 15-month period.
PubMed ID
10397521 View in PubMed
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Adverse health events associated with antimicrobial drug resistance in Campylobacter species: a registry-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58186
Source
J Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 1;191(7):1050-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2005
Author
Morten Helms
Jacob Simonsen
Katharina E P Olsen
Kare Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 1;191(7):1050-5
Date
Apr-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Campylobacter - drug effects - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Campylobacter Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Erythromycin - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Quinolones - pharmacology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Risk factors
Virulence
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Resistance to clinically important antimicrobial agents, particularly fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is increasing among Campylobacter isolates, but few studies have explored the human health consequences of such resistance. METHODS: In a registry-based cohort study, we determined the risk of invasive illness and death associated with infection with quinolone- and erythromycin-resistant Campylobacter strains, while adjusting for comorbidity. We linked data from the Danish Surveillance Registry for Enteric Pathogens with data from the Civil Registration System and National Health Registries. RESULTS: Of 3471 patients with Campylobacter infection, 22 (0.63%) had an adverse event, defined as invasive illness or death, within 90 days of the date of receipt of samples. Patients infected with quinolone-resistant Campylobacter strains had a 6-fold increased risk of an adverse event within 30 days of the date of receipt of samples, compared with patients infected with quinolone- and erythromycin-susceptible Campylobacter strains (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 6.17 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.62-23.47]). However, infection with erythromycin-resistant strains was associated with a >5-fold risk of an adverse event within 90 days of the date of receipt of samples (AOR, 5.51 [95% CI, 1.19-25.50]). CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides evidence of the human health consequences of resistance to clinically important agents among Campylobacter infections and the need for increased efforts to mitigate such resistance.
Notes
Comment In: J Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 1;191(7):1029-3115747234
Comment In: J Infect Dis. 2005 Dec 1;192(11):2027-8; author reply 2028-916267777
Erratum In: J Infect Dis. 2005 May 1;191(9):1570
PubMed ID
15747238 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli isolated from retail grain-fed veal meat from Southern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132413
Source
J Food Prot. 2011 Aug;74(8):1245-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Angela Cook
Richard J Reid-Smith
Rebecca J Irwin
Scott A McEwen
Virginia Young
Carl Ribble
Author Affiliation
Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, 120-255 Woodlawn Road West, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 8J1. angela.cook@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
J Food Prot. 2011 Aug;74(8):1245-51
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Campylobacter - drug effects
Cattle
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Ontario
Prevalence
Salmonella - drug effects
Abstract
This study estimated the prevalence of Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Escherichia coli isolates in fresh retail grain-fed veal obtained in Ontario, Canada. The prevalence and antimicrobial resistance patterns were examined for points of public health significance. Veal samples (n = 528) were collected from February 2003 through May 2004. Twenty-one Salmonella isolates were recovered from 18 (4%) of 438 samples and underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Resistance to one or more antimicrobials was found in 6 (29%) of 21 Salmonella isolates; 5 (24%) of 21 isolates were resistant to five or more antimicrobials. No resistance to antimicrobials of very high human health importance was observed. Ampicillin-chloramphenicolstreptomycin-sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline resistance was found in 5 (3%) of 21 Salmonella isolates. Campylobacter isolates were recovered from 5 (1%) of 438 samples; 6 isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Resistance to one or more antimicrobials was documented in 3 (50%) of 6 Campylobacter isolates. No Campylobacter isolates were resistant to five or more antimicrobials or category I antimicrobials. E. coli isolates were recovered from 387 (88%) of 438 samples; 1,258 isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Resistance to one or more antimicrobials was found in 678 (54%) of 1,258 E. coli isolates; 128 (10%) of 1,258 were resistant to five or more antimicrobials. Five (0.4%) and 7 (0.6%) of 1,258 E. coli isolates were resistant to ceftiofur and ceftriaxone, respectively, while 34 (3%) of 1,258 were resistant to nalidixic acid. Ciprofloxacin resistance was not detected. There were 101 different resistance patterns observed among E. coli isolates; resistance to tetracycline alone (12.7%, 161 of 1,258) was most frequently observed. This study provides baseline prevalence and antimicrobial resistance data and highlights potential public health concerns.
PubMed ID
21819650 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli isolated from retail turkey meat from southern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151705
Source
J Food Prot. 2009 Mar;72(3):473-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Angela Cook
Richard Reid-Smith
Rebecca Irwin
Scott A McEwen
Alfonso Valdivieso-Garcia
Carl Ribble
Author Affiliation
Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Public Health Agency of Canada, 120-255 Woodlawn Road West, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1H 8J1. angela_cook@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
J Food Prot. 2009 Mar;72(3):473-81
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Campylobacter - drug effects
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Ontario
Public Health
Risk assessment
Salmonella - drug effects
Turkeys
Abstract
This study estimated the prevalence of Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli isolated from fresh retail turkey purchased at grocery stores in Ontario, Canada. The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined and assessed for potential public health risk. From February 2003 to May 2004, 465 raw turkey meat samples were collected. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for Campylobacter isolates with a concentration gradient test and for Salmonella and E. coli isolates with a broth microdilution assay. Campylobacter isolates were recovered from 188 (46%) of 412 samples. The prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobials was 168 (81%) of 208. For antimicrobials of very high human health importance (category I of Health Canada's antimicrobial categorization), 12 (6%) of 208 Campylobacter isolates were ciprofloxacin resistant. Salmonella isolates were recovered from 95 (24%) of 397 samples. The prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobials was 50 (49%) of 102, and 13 (13%) of 102 samples were resistant to five or more antimicrobials. For category I antimicrobials, 14 (14%) of 102 and 1 (1%) of 102 isolates were resistant to ceftiofur and ceftriaxone, respectively. E. coli isolates were recovered from 392 (95%) of 412 turkey samples. The prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobials was 906 (71%) of 1,281, and 225 (18%) of 1,281 samples were resistant to five or more antimicrobials. For category I antimicrobials, 30 (2%) of 1,281 samples were resistant to ceftiofur. This study demonstrated that raw turkey pieces are a potential source of human exposure to enteric pathogens, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, if undercooked or improperly handled.
PubMed ID
19343933 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial use: a risk factor or a protective factor for acquiring campylobacteriosis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131648
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Oct;53(7):644-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Maike Koningstein
Jacob Simonsen
Morten Helms
Tine Hald
Kåre Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Oct;53(7):644-50
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Campylobacter - drug effects
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fluoroquinolones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Macrolides - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
It is well acknowledged that the use of antimicrobial drugs in food animals leads to antimicrobial drug resistance in foodborne bacteria such as Campylobacter; however, the role of human antimicrobial usage is much less investigated. The aim of this study was to quantify the odds of campylobacteriosis conferred by human consumption of fluoroquinolones and macrolides.
We conducted a registry-based retrospective case-control study on 31?669 laboratory-confirmed cases of campylobacteriosis between 1999 and 2005 in Denmark. Data were obtained from several Danish databases: the National Registry of Enteric Pathogens, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Prescription Database, and the Integrated Database on Labor Market Research. Odds ratios (OR) for campylobacteriosis were calculated by conditional logistic regression.
The risk of campylobacteriosis was reduced 1 month after exposure to macrolides (OR, 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56-0.92). Macrolide exposure 1 month to 2 years before infection was associated with an increased risk of a Campylobacter diagnosis (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.4-1.6). A history of fluoroquinolone use was also associated with increased risk (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.8-3.5). This risk was higher for resistant isolates than for susceptible ones.
Treatment with macrolides may protect against Campylobacter infection for a limited period of time, possibly due to the antibacterial effects of the drug or its metabolites. Fluoroquinolone treatment confers increased risk, probably due to a combination of competitive and selective effects, similar to what has been observed for nontyphoid Salmonella infection.
PubMed ID
21890769 View in PubMed
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Associations between antimicrobial exposure and resistance in fecal Campylobacter spp. from grow-finish pigs on-farm in Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151704
Source
J Food Prot. 2009 Mar;72(3):482-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Leigh B Rosengren
Cheryl L Waldner
Richard J Reid-Smith
Alfonso Valdivieso-Garcia
Author Affiliation
Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Large Animal Clinical Sciences, 52 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5B4. leigh.rosengren@vetepi.com
Source
J Food Prot. 2009 Mar;72(3):482-9
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Campylobacter - drug effects
Cluster analysis
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Feces - microbiology
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Microbiology
Humans
Macrolides - pharmacology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Risk assessment
Saskatchewan
Swine - microbiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
Campylobacter spp. (n = 405), isolated from the feces of apparently healthy grow-finish pigs in 20 herds, were tested for susceptibility to 10 antimicrobials representing seven classes. Twelve percent of the isolates were susceptible to all drugs, while 64% were resistant to two or more antimicrobial classes. Resistance was most common to clindamycin, azithromycin, and erythromycin (71% each), and 10% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin. An antimicrobial use risk-factor analysis and a variance analysis explored the connection between antimicrobial resistance and the herd. The antimicrobial exposure of each production phase of each herd, through feed and water, was evaluated as a potential risk factor for resistance to macrolides and quinolones. Every 100,000 pig days of macrolide exposure in nursery pigs increased the odds of resistance to macrolides by a factor of 1.3. In contrast, the odds of resistance to a quinolone were nine times higher in Campylobacter from herds without beta-lactam exposure in grow-finish pigs compared with those with exposure. The variance analysis identified remarkably high clustering between isolates within herds; the intraclass correlations for resistances ranged from 0.52 to 0.82. Such extreme clustering demonstrates the potential for herd-level interventions to influence antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter. The three key findings of this study, i.e., the prevalent resistance to macrolides, the association between macrolide exposure and Campylobacter resistance to macrolides, and the high clustering of resistance within herds, illustrate the need for continued study of antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter on pig farms and the importance of judicious antimicrobial use in pork production.
PubMed ID
19343934 View in PubMed
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Ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter spp. in retail chicken, western Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113101
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Jul;19(7):1121-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Agnes Agunos
David Léger
Brent P Avery
E Jane Parmley
Anne Deckert
Carolee A Carson
Lucie Dutil
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. agnes.agunos@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Jul;19(7):1121-4
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
British Columbia
Campylobacter - drug effects - isolation & purification
Chickens - microbiology
Ciprofloxacin - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Food Microbiology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Saskatchewan
Tetracycline - pharmacology
Abstract
During 2005-2010, the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance identified increased prevalence of ciprofloxacin (a fluororquinolone) resistance among Campylobacter isolates from retail chicken in British Columbia (4%-17%) and Saskatchewan (6%-11%), Canada. Fluoroquinolones are critically important to human medicine and are not labeled for use in poultry in Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23764141 View in PubMed
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Effect of Antimicrobial Use in Agricultural Animals on Drug-resistant Foodborne Campylobacteriosis in Humans: A Systematic Literature Review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280093
Source
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2016 Oct 02;56(13):2115-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-02-2016
Author
M A McCrackin
Kristi L Helke
Ashley M Galloway
Ann Z Poole
Cassandra D Salgado
Bernadette P Marriott
Source
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2016 Oct 02;56(13):2115-32
Date
Oct-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - analysis
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Anti-Infective Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Campylobacter - drug effects
Campylobacter Infections - drug therapy
Canada
Cattle
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Feces - microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - drug therapy
Humans
Macrolides - administration & dosage
Meat - microbiology
Milk - microbiology
Swine - microbiology
Turkeys - microbiology
United States
Veterinary Drugs - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
Controversy continues concerning antimicrobial use in food animals and its relationship to drug-resistant infections in humans. We systematically reviewed published literature for evidence of a relationship between antimicrobial use in agricultural animals and drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans. Based on publications from the United States (U.S.), Canada and Denmark from 2010 to July 2014, 195 articles were retained for abstract review, 50 met study criteria for full article review with 36 retained for which data are presented. Two publications reported increase in macrolide resistance of Campylobacter coli isolated from feces of swine receiving macrolides in feed, and one of these described similar findings for tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. A study in growing turkeys demonstrated increased macrolide resistance associated with therapeutic dosing with Tylan® in drinking water. One publication linked tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni clone SA in raw cow's milk to a foodborne outbreak in humans. No studies that identified farm antimicrobial use also traced antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter from farm to fork. Recent literature confirms that on farm antibiotic selection pressure can increase colonization of animals with drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. but is inadequately detailed to establish a causal relationship between use of antimicrobials in agricultural animals and prevalence of drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans.
PubMed ID
26580432 View in PubMed
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Inaccuracy of the disk diffusion method compared with the agar dilution method for susceptibility testing of Campylobacter spp.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129734
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2012 Jan;50(1):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Mirva Lehtopolku
Pirkko Kotilainen
Pauli Puukka
Ulla-Maija Nakari
Anja Siitonen
Erkki Eerola
Pentti Huovinen
Antti J Hakanen
Author Affiliation
Antimicrobial Resistance Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Turku and Helsinki, Finland. mipleht@utu.fi
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2012 Jan;50(1):52-6
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Campylobacter - drug effects - isolation & purification
Finland
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The agar dilution method has been standardized by the CLSI for the susceptibility testing of Campylobacter species, and according to these standards, the disk diffusion method should be used only in screening for macrolide and ciprofloxacin resistance. Nevertheless, the disk diffusion test is currently widely used, since it is easy to perform in clinical microbiology laboratories. In this study, the disk diffusion method was compared to the agar dilution method by analyzing the in vitro activities of seven antimicrobial agents against 174 Campylobacter strains collected in Finland between 2003 and 2008. Recommendations of the CLSI were followed using Mueller-Hinton agar plates with 5% of sheep blood. For each strain, the disk diffusion tests were performed two to four times. Of the 33 erythromycin-resistant strains (MIC, =16 µg/ml), 24 (73%) constantly showed a 6-mm erythromycin inhibition zone (i.e., no inhibition), while for seven strains the inhibition zone varied from 6 to 44 mm in repeated measurements. Among the 141 erythromycin-susceptible strains (MIC,
Notes
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Comment In: J Clin Microbiol. 2013 Jan;51(1):38023269979
Comment In: J Clin Microbiol. 2013 Jan;51(1):38123269980
PubMed ID
22075583 View in PubMed
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Isolation and characterization of catalase-negative and catalase-weak strains of Campylobacter species, including "Campylobacter upsaliensis," from humans with gastroenteritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230229
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1989 Sep;27(9):2042-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
D E Taylor
K. Hiratsuka
L. Mueller
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1989 Sep;27(9):2042-5
Date
Sep-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Campylobacter - drug effects - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Campylobacter Infections - microbiology
Catalase - biosynthesis
Child, Preschool
DNA Probes
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Diarrhea - microbiology
Gastroenteritis - microbiology
Hippurates - analysis
Humans
Infant
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Abstract
During 1987 and 1988, nine strains of catalase-negative or -weak Campylobacter species were isolated in Alberta, Canada. DNA hybridization studies demonstrated that seven strains were "Campylobacter upsaliensis," one strain was highly homologous with Campylobacter jejuni DNA, and one strain was a campylobacter unrelated to the other two species. All "C. upsaliensis" strains were hippurate negative, and six of seven were susceptible to cephalothin. The unusual variant of C. jejuni was hippurate positive and cephalothin resistant, whereas the unclassified strain was hippurate negative and resistant to intermediate levels of cephalothin. All patients from whom "C. upsaliensis" was isolated had diarrhea. Five of the patients were children two years old or younger, and two were adults. In this study, all catalase-negative and -weak strains were isolated from stool specimens by using a charcoal-based selective medium containing 32 micrograms of cefaperazone per ml and which was described by Hutchinson and Bolton (D. N. Hutchinson and F. J. Bolton, J. Clin. Pathol. 37:956-957, 1984).
Notes
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PubMed ID
2778067 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.