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105 records – page 2 of 11.

Breast cancer survival in ontario and california, 1998-2006: socioeconomic inequity remains much greater in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152844
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;19(2):121-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Kevin M Gorey
Isaac N Luginaah
Eric J Holowaty
Karen Y Fung
Caroline Hamm
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Windsor, Ontario. gorey@uwindsor.ca
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;19(2):121-4
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - economics - mortality
California - epidemiology
Female
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Poverty Areas
Social Class
Survival Analysis
Abstract
This study re-examined the differential effect of socioeconomic status on the survival of women with breast cancer in Canada and the United States. Ontario and California cancer registries provided 1,913 cases from urban and rural places. Stage-adjusted cohorts (1998-2000) were followed until 2006. Socioeconomic data were taken from population censuses. SES-survival associations were observed in California, but not in Ontario, and Canadian survival advantages in low-income areas were replicated. A better controlled and updated comparison reaffirmed the equity advantage of Canadian health care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19185806 View in PubMed
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California encephalitis in New Brunswick.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238787
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 May 15;132(10):1166
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1985
Author
J A Embil
P R Camfield
H. Artsob
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 May 15;132(10):1166
Date
May-15-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Encephalitis, Arbovirus - epidemiology
Encephalitis, California - epidemiology
Humans
Male
New Brunswick
Notes
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1982 Feb;28(2):200-47066765
Cites: Prog Clin Biol Res. 1983;123:277-906135222
PubMed ID
3995438 View in PubMed
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California encephalitis in Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242728
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Nov 15;127(10):957, 959
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1982
Author
J A Embil
P R Camfield
H. Artsob
K R Rozee
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1982 Nov 15;127(10):957, 959
Date
Nov-15-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Encephalitis, Arbovirus - epidemiology
Encephalitis, California - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia
Notes
Cites: Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1978 Jul;27(4):843-5686253
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Jan 12;122(1):60-2, 647363197
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1980 Jun;26(6):654-77397607
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1981 Nov;27(11):1219-237317859
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Nov 1;125(9):958, 9627332894
PubMed ID
7139442 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in California flight attendants (United States).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19080
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 May;13(4):317-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Peggy Reynolds
James Cone
Michael Layefsky
Debbie E Goldberg
Susan Hurley
Author Affiliation
California Department of Health Services, Environmental Health Investigations Branch, Oakland 94612, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 May;13(4):317-24
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Aircraft
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
California - epidemiology
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Social Class
Workplace
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine unusual exposure opportunities to flight crews from chemicals, cosmic radiation, and electric and magnetic fields. METHODS: This project evaluated the incidence of cancers of the breast and other sites among Association of Flight Attendants (AFA) members residing in California. AFA membership files were matched to California's statewide cancer registry to identify a total of 129 newly diagnosed invasive cancers among AFA members with California residential histories between 1988 and 1995. RESULTS: Compared to the general population, female breast cancer incidence was over 30% higher than expected, and malignant melanoma incidence was roughly twice that expected. Both of these are cancers that are associated with higher socioeconomic status and have been suggestively associated with various sources of radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the results from Nordic studies of cabin crews and a recent meta-analysis of prior studies, these data suggest that follow-up investigations should focus on the potential relative contribution of workplace exposures and lifestyle characteristics to the higher rates of disease for these two cancers.
PubMed ID
12074501 View in PubMed
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Cancer Stage in American Indians and Alaska Natives Enrolled in Medicaid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289339
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2016 Sep; 51(3):368-72
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Scott V Adams
Andrea N Burnett-Hartman
Andrew Karnopp
Aasthaa Bansal
Stacey A Cohen
Victoria Warren-Mears
Scott D Ramsey
Author Affiliation
Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. Electronic address: sadams@fredhutch.org.
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2016 Sep; 51(3):368-72
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska Natives - statistics & numerical data
California - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medicaid
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Oregon - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Registries
United States
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
Nationally, a greater proportion of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) are diagnosed with advanced-stage cancers compared with non-Hispanic whites. The reasons for observed differences in stage at diagnosis between AI/ANs and non-Hispanic whites remain unclear.
Medicaid, Indian Health Service Care Systems, and state cancer registry data for California, Oregon, and Washington (2001-2008, analyzed in 2014-2015) were linked to identify AI/ANs and non-Hispanic whites diagnosed with invasive breast, cervical, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer. Logistic regression was used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs for distant disease versus local or regional disease, in AI/ANs compared with non-Hispanic white case patients.
A similar proportion of AI/AN (31.2%) and non-Hispanic white (35.5%) patients were diagnosed with distant-stage cancer in this population (AOR=1.03, 95% CI=0.88, 1.20). No significant differences in stage at diagnosis were found for any individual cancer site. Among AI/ANs, Indian Health Service Care Systems eligibility was not associated with stage at diagnosis.
In contrast to the general population of the U.S., among Medicaid enrollees, AI/AN race is not associated with later stage at diagnosis. Cancer survival disparities associated with AI/AN race that have been observed in the broader population may be driven by factors associated with income and health insurance that are also associated with race, as income and insurance status are more homogenous within the Medicaid population than within the broader population.
Notes
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Cites: J Clin Oncol. 2015 Nov 1;33(31):3621-7 PMID 26371147
PubMed ID
27020318 View in PubMed
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[Characteristic of the new Khatanga virus genotype].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132729
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(5):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
A B Poglazov
O V Shliapnikova
A G Prilipov
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(5):45-9
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence - genetics
Classification
Encephalitis, California - epidemiology - virology
Genome, Viral
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
La Crosse virus - genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
RNA, Viral - genetics
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Complete nucleotide sequence of the S-segment and partial sequences of M- and L-segments (981 and 1005 nucleotide respectively) have been determined in 20 strains of California encephalitis serocomplex, isolated in Yakitiya, Sakhalin, and Kamchatka. The phylogenetic analysis ofgenomic S-, M-, and L-segments showed that all 20 strains are related to Khatanga virus (La Cross subtype of California encephalitis serotype). Eight strains belong to group 2 of Khatanga virus while the remaining 12 make up a new (third) genetic group of this virus having original S- and M-segments and L-segment similar to that of the second group.
PubMed ID
21786597 View in PubMed
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Chronic liver disease among two American Indian patient populations in the southwestern United States, 2000-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92685
Source
J Clin Gastroenterol. 2008 Aug;42(7):949-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Bialek Stephanie R
Redd John T
Lynch Audrey
Vogt Tara
Lewis Sharon
Wilson Charlton
Bell Beth P
Author Affiliation
Division of Viral Hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Mailstop G-37, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. zqg7@cdc.gov
Source
J Clin Gastroenterol. 2008 Aug;42(7):949-54
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - complications
Arizona - epidemiology
California - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
European Continental Ancestry Group
Hepatitis C, Chronic - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Liver Cirrhosis - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Liver Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Southwestern United States - epidemiology
Abstract
GOALS: To determine the etiologies of chronic liver disease among American Indians. BACKGROUND: American Indians are disproportionately affected by chronic liver disease, yet little is known about its underlying etiologies in this group. STUDY: We conducted a cross-sectional prevalence study at medical centers serving American Indian populations in Arizona and California. Patients' records were reviewed to identify those with chronic liver disease (ICD-9 code for chronic liver disease or 2 abnormal liver tests > or = 6 mo apart). ICD-9 codes and laboratory findings were abstracted to determine etiologies. RESULTS: Of the 30,698 American Indian patients seen at the Arizona center during 2000 to 2002, 1496 (4.9%) had chronic liver disease, including 268/1496 (17.9%) with decompensated cirrhosis. Etiologies included alcohol (621; 41.5%), hepatitis C (103; 6.9%), both (136; 9.1%), or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (191; 12.8%). Among alcohol-related liver disease patients tested for hepatitis C, 32.2% were positive. Of the 6074 American Indian patients seen at the California center during 2002 to 2003, 344 (5.7%) had chronic liver disease, including 45/344 (13.1%) with decompensated cirrhosis. Etiologies included alcohol (57; 16.6%) hepatitis C (83; 24.1%), and both (42; 12.2%). In one-third of chronic liver disease patient at the 2 centers, no etiology could be identified; 30% to 45% had not been tested for hepatitis C. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol-related liver disease and hepatitis C were the most commonly identified etiologies among these American Indian patients with chronic liver disease in clinical care. Identifying American Indian and Alaska Native patients with chronic liver disease and providing treatment are critical for reducing disease burden.
PubMed ID
18668704 View in PubMed
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Classification of American Indian race on birth and infant death certificates--California and Montana.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59508
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1993 Apr 2;42(12):220-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2-1993
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1993 Apr 2;42(12):220-3
Date
Apr-2-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Certificates
California - epidemiology
Death Certificates
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant mortality
Montana - epidemiology
Abstract
The accuracy of infant mortality rates and other indices of the health of populations depends on the consistency of information collected from separate sources (e.g., birth and death certificates). Inconsistent recording of basic information such as race and ethnicity has resulted in underestimation of mortality among minority populations, particularly minority populations other than blacks. This report summarizes studies in California and Montana that describe and measure the magnitude of differences in the recording of race for American Indians/Alaskan Natives (AI/ANs) on birth and infant death certificates.
PubMed ID
8450826 View in PubMed
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Clinical pathology and assessment of pathogen exposure in southern and Alaskan sea otters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4771
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2003 Oct;39(4):837-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Krista D Hanni
Jonna A K Mazet
Frances M D Gulland
James Estes
Michelle Staedler
Michael J Murray
Melissa Miller
David A Jessup
Author Affiliation
Wildlife Health Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA. wildlifehealth@ucdavis.edu
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2003 Oct;39(4):837-50
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Animals, Wild - blood - parasitology - virology
Antibodies, Protozoan - blood
Blood Chemical Analysis - veterinary
California - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hematologic Tests - veterinary
Male
Otters - blood - parasitology - virology
Population Density
Population Dynamics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Factors
Toxoplasma - immunology
Toxoplasmosis, Animal - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
The southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) population in California (USA) and the Alaskan sea otter (E. lutris kenyoni) population in the Aleutian Islands (USA) chain have recently declined. In order to evaluate disease as a contributing factor to the declines, health assessments of these two sea otter populations were conducted by evaluating hematologic and/or serum biochemical values and exposure to six marine and terrestrial pathogens using blood collected during ongoing studies from 1995 through 2000. Samples from 72 free-ranging Alaskan, 78 free-ranging southern, and (for pathogen exposure only) 41 debilitated southern sea otters in rehabilitation facilities were evaluated and compared to investigate regional differences. Serum chemistry and hematology values did not indicate a specific disease process as a cause for the declines. Statistically significant differences were found between free-ranging adult southern and Alaskan population mean serum levels of creatinine kinase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, calcium, cholesterol, creatinine, glucose, phosphorous, total bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, and sodium. These were likely due to varying parasite loads, contaminant exposures, and physiologic or nutrition statuses. No free-ranging sea otters had signs of disease at capture, and prevalences of exposure to calicivirus, Brucella spp., and Leptospira spp. were low. The high prevalence (35%) of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in free-ranging southern sea otters, lack of antibodies to this parasite in Alaskan sea otters, and the pathogen's propensity to cause mortality in southern sea otters suggests that this parasite may be important to sea otter population dynamics in California but not in Alaska. The evidence for exposure to pathogens of public health importance (e.g., Leptospira spp., T. gondii) in the southern sea otter population, and the naïveté of both populations to other pathogens (e.g., morbillivirus and Coccidiodes immitis) may have important implications for their management and recovery.
PubMed ID
14733279 View in PubMed
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105 records – page 2 of 11.