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105 records – page 1 of 11.

An inverse association between ovarian cysts and breast cancer in the breast cancer family registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173729
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 1;118(1):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2006
Author
Julia A Knight
Esther M John
Roger L Milne
Gillian S Dite
Ron Balbuena
Ellen J Q Shi
Graham G Giles
Argyrios Ziogas
Irene L Andrulis
Alice S Whittemore
John L Hopper
Author Affiliation
Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 1;118(1):197-202
Date
Jan-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Australia - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
California - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Ovarian Cysts - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Abstract
Ovarian cysts of several types are common in women of reproductive age. Their etiology is not well understood but is likely related to perturbations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The relationship of ovarian cysts to breast cancer risk is not known, although a negative association with polycystic ovarian syndrome has been reported. Incident, invasive female breast cancer cases, population-based controls and unaffected sisters of cases were studied from 3 countries participating in the Breast Cancer Family Registry: Melbourne and Sydney, Australia; the San Francisco Bay Area, USA; and Ontario, Canada. Using the same questionnaire, information was collected on self-reported history of ovarian cysts and other risk factors. Analyses were based on 3,049 cases, 2,344 population controls and 1,934 sister controls from all sites combined. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using both unconditional and conditional logistic regression using an offset term to account for sampling fractions at 2 of the sites. A significantly reduced risk of breast cancer was observed for women reporting a history of ovarian cysts (OR = 0.70, 95% CI 0.59-0.82, among all cases and all controls). This risk estimate was similar regardless of control group used, within all 3 sites and in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women (ORs ranging from 0.68-0.75, all 95% CI excluded 1.00). A self-reported history of ovarian cysts was strongly and consistently associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. Further study of ovarian cysts may increase our understanding of hormonal and other mechanisms of breast cancer etiology.
PubMed ID
16032703 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinical isolates of Bordetella pertussis from northern California: report from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31869
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2001 Dec;45(12):3599-600
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
K A Gordon
J. Fusco
D J Biedenbach
M A Pfaller
R N Jones
Author Affiliation
University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA.
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2001 Dec;45(12):3599-600
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bordetella pertussis - drug effects
California - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Female
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Whooping Cough - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Reports of an increased clinical incidence of pertussis and the development of resistance by Bordetella pertussis to erythromycin prompted the collection and testing of recent clinical isolates from patients in northern California against a range of antimicrobial agents by the Etest (AB BIODISK, Solna, Sweden) method. All isolates were fully susceptible to all eight agents tested (MIC,
PubMed ID
11709347 View in PubMed
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[Arborviruses of the California encephalitis serogroup 1N Russia and their contribution to infectious pathology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132730
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(5):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
L V Kolobukhina
S D L'vov
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(5):41-5
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, viral
Central Nervous System - pathology - virology
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Disease Reservoirs - virology
Disease Vectors
Ecosystem
Encephalitis Virus, California - isolation & purification - pathogenicity - physiology
Encephalitis, California - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology - virology
Humans
Kidney - pathology - virology
Liver - pathology - virology
Lung - pathology - virology
Mosquito control
Neutralization Tests
Periodicity
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Viral Tropism
Virulence
Abstract
This review focuses on arborviral infections associated with California serocomplex (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus). Results of relevant eco-epidemiological and clinical studies in Russia are presented suggesting the ubiquitious nature of diseases caused by viruses of the California encephalitis serocomplex (Inko, Tahyna, Snowshoe Hare). The etiologic structure of these diseases in taiga and mixed woods of the European part and Western Siberia is dominated by the Inco virus and in southern regions by Tahina. The diseases have a well apparent seasonal pattern (July-August) in agreement with the peak summer activity of the pathogens. Two clinical forms of pathology are distinguished, influenza-like and generalized, the latter affecting lungs, kidneys, liver, and CNS. The Inco virus plays a key role in pathogenesis of the generalized form affecting CNS.
PubMed ID
21786596 View in PubMed
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Associated malformations in infants and fetuses with upper or lower neural tube defects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58990
Source
Teratology. 1998 Feb;57(2):56-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
B. Kälién
E. Robert
J. Harris
Author Affiliation
Tornblad Institute, University of Lund, Sweden. embryol@embryol.lu.se
Source
Teratology. 1998 Feb;57(2):56-63
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology - ethnology
Abortion, Induced
California - epidemiology
Chromosome Aberrations - epidemiology - ethnology
Chromosome Disorders
Female
Fetus - abnormalities
France - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology - ethnology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Syndrome
Abstract
The paper describes associated malformations in infants born with neural tube defects (N = 3,809) from three large malformation registers and in fetuses aborted because of a diagnosed neural tube defect (N = 748) from two of the registers. In infants, upper spina bifida and encephalocele are more often associated with non-neural malformations than anencephaly or lower spina bifida. Aborted fetuses with spina bifida or encephalocele have associated malformations registered more often than infants with those neural tube defects, but the opposite is true for anencephaly. The degree of detail of the investigation of an aborted specimen or a perinatally dead infant will contribute to such differences but they can also depend on the fact that prenatal detection may be facilitated by the simultaneous presence of other malformations like body wall defects. Also, fetuses with many malformations may be more prone to abort spontaneously late in pregnancy. Variable prenatal diagnosis may, therefore, explain population differences in the pattern of associated malformations. The type of associated malformation differs with the level of the neural tube defect: this could be due to different causal mechanisms or be a question of cranio-caudal level and/or timing. For limb reduction defects, however, we did not find any association between upper limb and upper neural tube defects or lower limb and lower neural tube defects. These findings together with other epidemiological data support the idea that upper and lower neural tube defects may have different significance in epidemiological studies and should be treated separately.
PubMed ID
9562677 View in PubMed
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Association of an X-chromosome dodecamer insertional variant allele with mental retardation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204843
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 1998 Jul;3(4):303-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
R A Philibert
B H King
S. Winfield
E H Cook
Y H Lee
B. Stubblefield
P. Damschroder-Williams
C. Dea
A. Palotie
C. Tengstrom
B M Martin
E I Ginns
Author Affiliation
Clinical Neuroscience Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. philiber@irp.nimh.nih.gov
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 1998 Jul;3(4):303-9
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Base Sequence
California - epidemiology
Chromosome Mapping
Conserved Sequence
Cosmids
DNA Transposable Elements
Europe - epidemiology
Exons
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fragile X Syndrome - genetics
Gene Library
Genetic Variation
Humans
Hypothyroidism - epidemiology - genetics
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Intellectual Disability - genetics
Male
Mice
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prevalence
Sequence Alignment
Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Trinucleotide Repeats
X Chromosome
Abstract
Mental retardation is a prominent feature of many neurodevelopmental syndromes. In an attempt to identify genetic components of these illnesses, we isolated and sequenced a large number of human genomic cosmid inserts containing large trinucleotide repeats. One of these cosmids, Cos-4, maps to the X-chromosome and contains the sequence of a 7.3-kb mRNA. Initial polymorphism analysis across a region of repetitive DNA in this gene revealed a rare 12-bp exonic variation (
Notes
Erratum In: Mol Psychiatry 1999 Mar;4(2):197
PubMed ID
9702738 View in PubMed
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Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L. are broadly susceptible to isolates representing the North American genogroups of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278813
Source
J Fish Dis. 2016 Jan;39(1):55-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
G. Kurath
J R Winton
O B Dale
M K Purcell
K. Falk
R A Busch
Source
J Fish Dis. 2016 Jan;39(1):55-67
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
California - epidemiology
Female
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - mortality - virology
Fisheries
Genotype
Idaho - epidemiology
Immunohistochemistry - veterinary
Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus - classification - genetics - pathogenicity
Intestines - pathology
Kidney - pathology
Kinetics
Necrosis
Pancreas, Exocrine - pathology
Phylogeny
Rhabdoviridae Infections - epidemiology - veterinary - virology
Salmo salar
Spleen - pathology
Survival Analysis
Virulence
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
Beginning in 1992, three epidemic waves of infectious hematopoietic necrosis, often with high mortality, occurred in farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. on the west coast of North America. We compared the virulence of eleven strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), representing the U, M and L genogroups, in experimental challenges of juvenile Atlantic salmon in freshwater. All strains caused mortality and there was wide variation within genogroups: cumulative mortality for five U-group strains ranged from 20 to 100%, four M-group strains ranged 30-63% and two L-group strains varied from 41 to 81%. Thus, unlike Pacific salmonids, there was no apparent correlation of virulence in a particular host species with virus genogroup. The mortality patterns indicated two different phenotypes in terms of kinetics of disease progression and final per cent mortality, with nine strains having moderate virulence and two strains (from the U and L genogroups) having high virulence. These phenotypes were investigated by histopathology and immunohistochemistry to describe the variation in the course of IHNV disease in Atlantic salmon. The results from this study demonstrate that IHNV may become a major threat to farmed Atlantic salmon in other regions of the world where the virus has been, or may be, introduced.
PubMed ID
25381936 View in PubMed
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Autism and thimerosal-containing vaccines: lack of consistent evidence for an association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30822
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2003 Aug;25(2):101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Paul Stehr-Green
Peet Tull
Michael Stellfeld
Preben-Bo Mortenson
Diane Simpson
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. pstehrgreen@worldnet.att.net
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2003 Aug;25(2):101-6
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autistic Disorder - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology
Bias (epidemiology)
California - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects - chemistry
Haemophilus Vaccines - adverse effects - chemistry
Hepatitis B Vaccines - adverse effects - chemistry
Humans
Incidence
Infant
International Classification of Diseases
Mercury Poisoning, Nervous System - epidemiology
Preservatives, Pharmaceutical - poisoning
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden - epidemiology
Thimerosal - poisoning
Vaccination - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In 1999, concerns were raised that vaccines containing the preservative Thimerosal might increase the risk of autism and/or other neurodevelopmental disorders. METHODS: Between the mid-1980s through the late-1990s, we compared the prevalence/incidence of autism in California, Sweden, and Denmark with average exposures to Thimerosal-containing vaccines. Graphic ecologic analyses were used to examine population-based data from the United States (national immunization coverage surveys and counts of children diagnosed with autism-like disorders seeking special education services in California); Sweden (national inpatient data on autism cases, national vaccination coverage levels, and information on use of all vaccines and vaccine-specific amounts of Thimerosal); and Denmark (national registry of inpatient/outpatient-diagnosed autism cases, national vaccination coverage levels, and information on use of all vaccines and vaccine-specific amounts of Thimerosal). RESULTS: In all three countries, the incidence and prevalence of autism-like disorders began to rise in the 1985-1989 period, and the rate of increase accelerated in the early 1990s. However, in contrast to the situation in the United States, where the average Thimerosal dose from vaccines increased throughout the 1990s, Thimerosal exposures from vaccines in both Sweden and Denmark-already low throughout the 1970s and 1980s-began to decrease in the late 1980s and were eliminated in the early 1990s. CONCLUSIONS: The body of existing data, including the ecologic data presented herein, is not consistent with the hypothesis that increased exposure to Thimerosal-containing vaccines is responsible for the apparent increase in the rates of autism in young children being observed worldwide.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Prev Med. 2004 Jan;26(1):91; reply 91-214700719
PubMed ID
12880876 View in PubMed
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Bartonella spp. exposure in northern and southern sea otters in Alaska and California.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265772
Source
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2014 Dec;14(12):831-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Sebastian E Carrasco
Bruno B Chomel
Verena A Gill
Angela M Doroff
Melissa A Miller
Kathleen A Burek-Huntington
Rickie W Kasten
Barbara A Byrne
Tracey Goldstein
Jonna A K Mazet
Source
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2014 Dec;14(12):831-7
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Bartonella - immunology
Bartonella Infections - blood - epidemiology - veterinary
California - epidemiology
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect - veterinary
Otters - blood - microbiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Since 2002, an increased number of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from southcentral Alaska have been reported to be dying due to endocarditis and/or septicemia with infection by Streptococcus infantarius subsp. coli. Bartonella spp. DNA was also detected in northern sea otters as part of mortality investigations during this unusual mortality event (UME) in Kachemak Bay, Alaska. To evaluate the extent of exposure to Bartonella spp. in sea otters, sera collected from necropsied and live-captured northern sea otters, as well as necropsied southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) unaffected by the UME, were analyzed using an immunofluorescent antibody assay. Antibodies against Bartonella spp. were detected in sera from 50% of necropsied and 34% of presumed healthy, live-captured northern sea otters and in 16% of necropsied southern sea otters. The majority of sea otters with reactive sera were seropositive for B. washoensis, with antibody titers ranging from 1:64 to 1:256. Bartonella spp. antibodies were especially common in adult northern sea otters, both free-living (49%) and necropsied (62%). Adult stranded northern sea otters that died from infectious causes, such as opportunistic bacterial infections, were 27 times more likely to be Bartonella seropositive than adult stranded northern sea otters that died from noninfectious causes (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
25514118 View in PubMed
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Birth prevalence study of the Apert syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59635
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1992 Mar 1;42(5):655-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1992
Author
M M Cohen
S. Kreiborg
E J Lammer
J F Cordero
P. Mastroiacovo
J D Erickson
P. Roeper
M L Martínez-Frías
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1992 Mar 1;42(5):655-9
Date
Mar-1-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrocephalosyndactylia - epidemiology
California - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Georgia - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Mutation - genetics
Nebraska - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Spain - epidemiology
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
Estimates of the Apert syndrome birth prevalence and the mutation rate are reported for Washington State, Nebraska, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Atlanta, and Northern California. Data were pooled to increase the number of Apert births (n = 57) and produce a more stable birth prevalence estimate. Birth prevalence of the Apert syndrome was calculated to be approximately 15.5/1,000,000 births, which is twice the rate determined in earlier studies. The major reason appears to be incomplete ascertainment in the earlier studies. The similarity of the point estimates and the narrow bounds of the confidence limits in the present study suggest that the birth prevalence of the Apert syndrome over different populations is fairly uniform. The mutation rate was calculated to be 7.8 x 10(-6) per gene per generation. Apert syndrome accounts for about 4.5% of all cases of craniosynostosis. The mortality rate appears to be increased compared to that experienced in the general population; however, further study of the problem is necessary.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Med Genet. 1993 Feb 1;45(3):392-38434630
PubMed ID
1303629 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening practices and correlates among American Indian and Alaska native women in California, 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97787
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2010 Mar-Apr;20(2):139-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan M Eberth
John Charles Huber
Antonio Rene
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, Houston, TX 77098, USA. Jan.M.Eberth@uth.tmc.edu
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2010 Mar-Apr;20(2):139-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology
California - epidemiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Mammography
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Breast cancer incidence and mortality have been increasing among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women, and their survival rate is the lowest of all racial/ethnic groups. Nevertheless, knowledge of AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices and their correlates is limited. METHODS: Using the 2003 California Health Interview Survey, we 1) compared the breast cancer screening practices of AI/AN women to other groups and 2) explored the association of several factors known or thought to influence AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices. FINDINGS: Compared with other races, AI/AN women had the lowest rate of mammogram screening (ever and within the past 2 years). For clinical breast examination receipt, Asian women had the lowest rate, followed by AI/AN women. Factors associated with AI/AN women's breast cancer screening practices included older age, having a high school diploma or some college education, receipt of a Pap test within the past 3 years, and having visited a doctor within the past year. CONCLUSION: Significant differences in breast cancer screening practices were noted between races, with AI/AN women often having significantly lower rates. Integrating these epidemiologic findings into effective policy and practice requires additional applied research initiatives.
PubMed ID
20211430 View in PubMed
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105 records – page 1 of 11.