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337 records – page 1 of 34.

[A course in USA put traces on professional life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143149
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Apr 28-May 4;107(17):1169-70
Publication Type
Article

Advancing the population health agenda: encouraging the integration of social theory into population health research and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177868
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):392-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katherine L Frohlich
Eric Mykhalovskiy
Fiona Miller
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
Groupe de recherche interdisciplinaire en santé (GRIS), Faculté de Médicine, Université de Montréal, QC. katherine.frohlich@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):392-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
California
Canada
Humans
Population Dynamics
Public Health
Research
Sociology, Medical
PubMed ID
15490933 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol control policies: a public health issue revisited.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242426
Source
WHO Chron. 1983;37(5):169-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983

Allele frequency shifts in response to climate change and physiological consequences of allozyme variation in a montane insect.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95915
Source
Evolution. 2002 Nov;56(11):2278-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Rank Nathan E
Dahlhoff Elizabeth P
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Sonoma State University, 1801 E. Cotati Avenue, Rohnert Park, California 9492, USA. rank@sonoma.edu
Source
Evolution. 2002 Nov;56(11):2278-89
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Beetles - genetics - physiology
California
Climate
Female
Gene Frequency
Glucose-6-Phosphate Isomerase - genetics
Insect Proteins - genetics
Isocitrate Dehydrogenase - genetics
Isoenzymes - genetics
Male
Phosphoglucomutase - genetics
Temperature
Abstract
Rapid changes in climate may impose strong selective pressures on organisms. Evolutionary responses to climate change have been observed in natural populations, yet no example has been documented for a metabolic enzyme locus. Furthermore, few studies have linked physiological responses to stress with allozyme genotypic variation. We quantified changes in allele frequency between 1988 and 1996 at three allozyme loci (isocitrate dehydrogenase, Idh; phosphoglucose isomerase, Pgi; and phosphoglucomutase, Pgm) for the leaf beetle Chrysomela aeneicollis in the Bishop Creek region of the Sierra Nevada of California (2900-3300 m). Beetles often experience high daytime (> 32 degrees C) and extremely low nighttime (
PubMed ID
12487357 View in PubMed
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American Indians and Alaska Natives in California: women's cancer screening and results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3869
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Delight E Satter
Brenda F Seals
Y Jenny Chia
Melissa Gatchell
Linda Burhansstipanov
Author Affiliation
UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. delight@ucla.edu
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):58-64
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - prevention & control
California
Comparative Study
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND METHODS: The purpose of this article was to examine differences in demographics, general health status, and utilization of breast and cervical cancer screening for subgroups of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN) using the 2001 California Health Interview Survey. RESULTS: The statewide distribution of California American Indians, non-California AIANs, and unknown AIANs are 10%, 51%, and 39%, respectively. Significant differences exist among the 3 tribal subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, AIAN women aged 40+ years are close to the Healthy People 2010 goals for receipt of a mammogram in the past 2 years and for receipt of a Pap test ever and in the past 3 years. Less than 5% of AIAN in California report Indian Health Service coverage.
PubMed ID
15916523 View in PubMed
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Analysis of microsatellite variation in Pinus radiata reveals effects of genetic drift but no recent bottlenecks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82931
Source
J Evol Biol. 2006 Jan;19(1):167-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Karhu A.
Vogl C.
Moran G F
Bell J C
Savolainen O.
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Evol Biol. 2006 Jan;19(1):167-75
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
California
Cluster analysis
Gene Frequency
Genetic Drift
Genetics, Population
Mexico
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Pinus - genetics
Population Dynamics
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
Most conifer species occur in large continuous populations, but radiata pine, Pinus radiata, occurs only in five disjunctive natural populations in California and Mexico. The Mexican island populations were presumably colonized from the mainland millions of years ago. According to Axelrod (1981), the mainland populations are relicts of an earlier much wider distribution, reduced some 8,000 years ago, whereas according to Millar (1997, 2000), the patchy metapopulation-like structure is typical of the long-term population demography of the species. We used 19 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci to describe population structure and to search for signs of the dynamics of population demography over space and time. Frequencies of null alleles at microsatellite loci were estimated using an approach based on the probability of identity by descent. Microsatellite genetic diversities were high in all populations [expected heterozygosity (H(e)) = 0.68-0.77], but the island populations had significantly lower estimates. Variation between loci in genetic differentiation (F(ST)) was high, but no locus deviated statistically significantly from the rest at an experiment wide level of 0.05. Thus, all loci were included in subsequent analysis. The average differentiation was measured as F(ST) = 0.14 (SD 0.012), comparable with earlier allozyme results. The island populations were more diverged from the other populations and from an inferred common ancestral gene pool than the mainland ones. All populations showed a deficiency of expected heterozygosity given the number of alleles, the mainland populations more so than the island ones. The results thus do not support a recent important contraction in the mainland range of radiata pine.
PubMed ID
16405588 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analytical epidemiology of primary liver carcinoma in the Pacific Basin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4243
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1982;62:123-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
K C Lam
M J Tong
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1982;62:123-7
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aflatoxins - adverse effects
Alaska
Asia, Southeastern
California
China
Female
Hepatitis B - complications
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Nitrosamines - adverse effects
Pacific Islands
Abstract
In the Pacific Basin, the hepatitis B virus is closely associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in its geographic distribution and familial clustering, and its presence in liver tissues. The contribution of aflatoxin to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in different regions varies from negligible to probably major. Neither the hepatitis B virus nor aflatoxin can account for the varied epidemiology of hepatocarcinogenesis in the Pacific Basin. Many potential carcinogens for the liver have been identified in food, drugs, industrial chemicals, and in the general environment, but their importance in hepatocarcinogenesis remains to be defined.
PubMed ID
7167173 View in PubMed
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An analysis of the subjective marijuana experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251574
Source
Int J Addict. 1976;11(2):295-307
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
C. Adamec
R O Pihl
L. Leiter
Source
Int J Addict. 1976;11(2):295-307
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Amphetamines
California
Cannabis - pharmacology
Female
Heroin Dependence - epidemiology
Humans
Lysergic Acid Diethylamide
Male
Opium
Phytotherapy
Psychophysiology
Quebec
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Self Disclosure
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
Two hundred and thirty-six marijuana users who volunteered for a study in which they would use the drug were administered a Drug History and a Marihuana Effects Questionnaires. In addition to obtaining descriptive information of drug experiment volunteers and a factor analysis of the marijuana experience, the relationship between experience and effect variables were studied. The results of the above analysis suggest that the "typical" subject in marijuana experiments is not a "typical" user, that the marijuana experience is verbally definable, and that prior expectancies and histories of effect alter the experience.
PubMed ID
942628 View in PubMed
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An inverse association between ovarian cysts and breast cancer in the breast cancer family registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173729
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 1;118(1):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2006
Author
Julia A Knight
Esther M John
Roger L Milne
Gillian S Dite
Ron Balbuena
Ellen J Q Shi
Graham G Giles
Argyrios Ziogas
Irene L Andrulis
Alice S Whittemore
John L Hopper
Author Affiliation
Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 1;118(1):197-202
Date
Jan-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Australia - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
California - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Ovarian Cysts - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Abstract
Ovarian cysts of several types are common in women of reproductive age. Their etiology is not well understood but is likely related to perturbations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The relationship of ovarian cysts to breast cancer risk is not known, although a negative association with polycystic ovarian syndrome has been reported. Incident, invasive female breast cancer cases, population-based controls and unaffected sisters of cases were studied from 3 countries participating in the Breast Cancer Family Registry: Melbourne and Sydney, Australia; the San Francisco Bay Area, USA; and Ontario, Canada. Using the same questionnaire, information was collected on self-reported history of ovarian cysts and other risk factors. Analyses were based on 3,049 cases, 2,344 population controls and 1,934 sister controls from all sites combined. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using both unconditional and conditional logistic regression using an offset term to account for sampling fractions at 2 of the sites. A significantly reduced risk of breast cancer was observed for women reporting a history of ovarian cysts (OR = 0.70, 95% CI 0.59-0.82, among all cases and all controls). This risk estimate was similar regardless of control group used, within all 3 sites and in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women (ORs ranging from 0.68-0.75, all 95% CI excluded 1.00). A self-reported history of ovarian cysts was strongly and consistently associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. Further study of ovarian cysts may increase our understanding of hormonal and other mechanisms of breast cancer etiology.
PubMed ID
16032703 View in PubMed
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337 records – page 1 of 34.