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343 records – page 1 of 35.

[A course in USA put traces on professional life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143149
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Apr 28-May 4;107(17):1169-70
Publication Type
Article

Across continents and demographics, unpredictable maternal signals are associated with children's cognitive function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310206
Source
EBioMedicine. 2019 Aug; 46:256-263
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2019
Author
Elysia Poggi Davis
Riikka Korja
Linnea Karlsson
Laura M Glynn
Curt A Sandman
Brian Vegetabile
Eeva-Leena Kataja
Saara Nolvi
Eija Sinervä
Juho Pelto
Hasse Karlsson
Hal S Stern
Tallie Z Baram
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, CO, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California-Irvine, Hewitt Hall, Irvine, CA 92697, USA. Electronic address: Elysia.Davis@du.edu.
Source
EBioMedicine. 2019 Aug; 46:256-263
Date
Aug-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
California
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cognition
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Male
Maternal Behavior
Mother-Child Relations - psychology
Abstract
Early life experiences have persisting influence on brain function throughout life. Maternal signals constitute a primary source of early life experiences, and their quantity and quality during sensitive developmental periods exert enduring effects on cognitive function and emotional and social behaviors. Here we examined if, in addition to established qualitative dimensions of maternal behavior during her interactions with her infant and child, patterns of maternal signals may contribute to the maturation of children's executive functions. We focused primarily on effortful control, a potent predictor of mental health outcomes later in life.
In two independent prospective cohorts in Turku, Finland (N?=?135), and Irvine, CA, USA (N?=?192) that differed significantly in race/ethnicity and sociodemographic parameters, we assessed whether infant exposure to unpredictable patterns of maternal-derived sensory signals portended poor effortful control.
In both the Irvine and Turku cohorts, unpredictable sequences of maternal behavior during infancy were associated with worse effortful control at one year of age. Longitudinal analyses demonstrated that this association persisted for as long as each cohort was assessed-until two years of age in the Turku cohort and to 9.5?years in the Irvine cohort. The relation of unpredictable maternal signals during infancy and the measures of executive function persisted after adjusting for covariates.
The consistency of our findings across two cohorts from different demographic backgrounds substantiated the finding that patterns, and specifically unpredictable sequences, of maternal behaviors may influence the development of executive functions which may be associated with vulnerability to subsequent psychopathology. FUND: This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awards P50MH096889, HD051852, NS041298, HD02413, HD050662, HD065823, and by the FinnBrain funders: Academy of Finland (129839, 134950, 253270, 286829, 287908, 308176, 308252), Jane and Aatos Erkko Foundation, Signe and Ane Gyllenberg Foundation, Yrjö Jahnsson Foundation, and State Research Grants (P3498, P3654).
PubMed ID
31362905 View in PubMed
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Advancing the population health agenda: encouraging the integration of social theory into population health research and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177868
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):392-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katherine L Frohlich
Eric Mykhalovskiy
Fiona Miller
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
Groupe de recherche interdisciplinaire en santé (GRIS), Faculté de Médicine, Université de Montréal, QC. katherine.frohlich@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):392-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
California
Canada
Humans
Population Dynamics
Public Health
Research
Sociology, Medical
PubMed ID
15490933 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol control policies: a public health issue revisited.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242426
Source
WHO Chron. 1983;37(5):169-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983

Allele frequency shifts in response to climate change and physiological consequences of allozyme variation in a montane insect.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95915
Source
Evolution. 2002 Nov;56(11):2278-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Rank Nathan E
Dahlhoff Elizabeth P
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Sonoma State University, 1801 E. Cotati Avenue, Rohnert Park, California 9492, USA. rank@sonoma.edu
Source
Evolution. 2002 Nov;56(11):2278-89
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Beetles - genetics - physiology
California
Climate
Female
Gene Frequency
Glucose-6-Phosphate Isomerase - genetics
Insect Proteins - genetics
Isocitrate Dehydrogenase - genetics
Isoenzymes - genetics
Male
Phosphoglucomutase - genetics
Temperature
Abstract
Rapid changes in climate may impose strong selective pressures on organisms. Evolutionary responses to climate change have been observed in natural populations, yet no example has been documented for a metabolic enzyme locus. Furthermore, few studies have linked physiological responses to stress with allozyme genotypic variation. We quantified changes in allele frequency between 1988 and 1996 at three allozyme loci (isocitrate dehydrogenase, Idh; phosphoglucose isomerase, Pgi; and phosphoglucomutase, Pgm) for the leaf beetle Chrysomela aeneicollis in the Bishop Creek region of the Sierra Nevada of California (2900-3300 m). Beetles often experience high daytime (> 32 degrees C) and extremely low nighttime (
PubMed ID
12487357 View in PubMed
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American Indian/Alaska Native Smokers' Utilization of a Statewide Tobacco Quitline: Engagement and Quitting Behaviors From 2008 to 2018.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311299
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2021 01 07; 23(1):219-226
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
01-07-2021
Author
Brianna A Lienemann
Sharon E Cummins
Gary J Tedeschi
Shiushing Wong
Shu-Hong Zhu
Author Affiliation
Moores Cancer Center, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA.
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2021 01 07; 23(1):219-226
Date
01-07-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaskan Natives - psychology - statistics & numerical data
American Natives - psychology - statistics & numerical data
California - epidemiology
Counseling - methods
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hotlines - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Random Allocation
Smokers - psychology
Smoking - psychology
Smoking Cessation - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Tobacco Use Cessation Devices - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine access, engagement, and quitting behaviors of American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) callers to the California Smokers' Helpline. Telephone counseling is the primary function of the quitline. The overarching theoretical framework for California's quitline is social cognitive theory, although it also utilizes motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavioral strategies.
AIAN (n = 16 089) and White (n = 173 425) California quitline callers from 2009 to 2018 were compared on their characteristics, engagement, and quitting behaviors. Quitline callers responded to a telephone survey at intake. A random selection was called for evaluation 7 months later (White n = 8194, AIAN n = 764). Data from the 2009 to 2017 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) were used as a reference point for AIANs (AIAN n = 1373).
The quitline and CHIS had similar proportions of AIANs (4.6% vs. 4.3%, respectively). AIAN smokers were more likely than White smokers to report physical (53.6% vs. 44.9%) and mental (65.7% vs. 57.8%) health conditions at intake. AIANs were more likely to participate in counseling than White callers (67.1% vs. 65.7%). Among those who received counseling, AIANs had greater odds than White smokers of making a quit attempt (adjusted odds ratio = 1.39 [1.06, 1.81]) and similar odds of quitting for 180 days (adjusted odds ratio = 0.95 [0.69, 1.31]).
Rates of access, engagement, and quitting suggest that individualized quitline counseling was as effective with AIANs as it was with White smokers. Increasing efforts to refer AIANs to existing state quitlines can help more smokers quit.
This study showed that AIAN smokers were well represented among California quitline callers, even without a targeted campaign. It also found that AIAN smokers engaged in quitline services and were as able to quit as their White counterparts were, even after adjusting for other baseline characteristics. One implication is that public health programs can promote quitlines using broad-based campaigns knowing that they will still motivate AIAN smokers to seek help. Another implication is that a standard, individualized counseling protocol delivered by culturally competent quitline staff can effectively help AIAN smokers to quit.
PubMed ID
31711234 View in PubMed
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American Indians and Alaska Natives in California: women's cancer screening and results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3869
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Delight E Satter
Brenda F Seals
Y Jenny Chia
Melissa Gatchell
Linda Burhansstipanov
Author Affiliation
UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. delight@ucla.edu
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):58-64
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - prevention & control
California
Comparative Study
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND METHODS: The purpose of this article was to examine differences in demographics, general health status, and utilization of breast and cervical cancer screening for subgroups of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN) using the 2001 California Health Interview Survey. RESULTS: The statewide distribution of California American Indians, non-California AIANs, and unknown AIANs are 10%, 51%, and 39%, respectively. Significant differences exist among the 3 tribal subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, AIAN women aged 40+ years are close to the Healthy People 2010 goals for receipt of a mammogram in the past 2 years and for receipt of a Pap test ever and in the past 3 years. Less than 5% of AIAN in California report Indian Health Service coverage.
PubMed ID
15916523 View in PubMed
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Analysis of microsatellite variation in Pinus radiata reveals effects of genetic drift but no recent bottlenecks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82931
Source
J Evol Biol. 2006 Jan;19(1):167-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Karhu A.
Vogl C.
Moran G F
Bell J C
Savolainen O.
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Evol Biol. 2006 Jan;19(1):167-75
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
California
Cluster analysis
Gene Frequency
Genetic Drift
Genetics, Population
Mexico
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Pinus - genetics
Population Dynamics
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
Most conifer species occur in large continuous populations, but radiata pine, Pinus radiata, occurs only in five disjunctive natural populations in California and Mexico. The Mexican island populations were presumably colonized from the mainland millions of years ago. According to Axelrod (1981), the mainland populations are relicts of an earlier much wider distribution, reduced some 8,000 years ago, whereas according to Millar (1997, 2000), the patchy metapopulation-like structure is typical of the long-term population demography of the species. We used 19 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci to describe population structure and to search for signs of the dynamics of population demography over space and time. Frequencies of null alleles at microsatellite loci were estimated using an approach based on the probability of identity by descent. Microsatellite genetic diversities were high in all populations [expected heterozygosity (H(e)) = 0.68-0.77], but the island populations had significantly lower estimates. Variation between loci in genetic differentiation (F(ST)) was high, but no locus deviated statistically significantly from the rest at an experiment wide level of 0.05. Thus, all loci were included in subsequent analysis. The average differentiation was measured as F(ST) = 0.14 (SD 0.012), comparable with earlier allozyme results. The island populations were more diverged from the other populations and from an inferred common ancestral gene pool than the mainland ones. All populations showed a deficiency of expected heterozygosity given the number of alleles, the mainland populations more so than the island ones. The results thus do not support a recent important contraction in the mainland range of radiata pine.
PubMed ID
16405588 View in PubMed
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Analytical epidemiology of primary liver carcinoma in the Pacific Basin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4243
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1982;62:123-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
K C Lam
M J Tong
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1982;62:123-7
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aflatoxins - adverse effects
Alaska
Asia, Southeastern
California
China
Female
Hepatitis B - complications
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Nitrosamines - adverse effects
Pacific Islands
Abstract
In the Pacific Basin, the hepatitis B virus is closely associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in its geographic distribution and familial clustering, and its presence in liver tissues. The contribution of aflatoxin to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in different regions varies from negligible to probably major. Neither the hepatitis B virus nor aflatoxin can account for the varied epidemiology of hepatocarcinogenesis in the Pacific Basin. Many potential carcinogens for the liver have been identified in food, drugs, industrial chemicals, and in the general environment, but their importance in hepatocarcinogenesis remains to be defined.
PubMed ID
7167173 View in PubMed
Less detail

343 records – page 1 of 35.