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A 26-week, prospective, open-label, uncontrolled, multicenter study to evaluate the effect of an escalating-dose regimen of trandolapril on change in blood pressure in treatment-naive and concurrently treated adult hypertensive subjects (TRAIL).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163832
Source
Clin Ther. 2007 Feb;29(2):305-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Richard H Tytus
Ellen D Burgess
Linda Assouline
Anita Vanjaka
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Ther. 2007 Feb;29(2):305-15
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Indoles - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Verapamil - therapeutic use
Abstract
This study evaluated the effectiveness of an escalating-dose regimen of trandolapril in subjects with stage 1 or stage 2 hypertension.
This was a 26-week, prospective, open-label,multicenter study in Canadian primary care centers. Subjects with hypertension who were treatment naive or whose disease was uncontrolled on current first-line antihypertensive monotherapy were treated with trandolapril for 26 weeks alone or in addition to their current treatment. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) >or=140/90 mm Hg in subjects with no other risk factors or >or=130/80 mm Hg in subjects with diabetes or kidney disease. Trandolapril therapy was initiated at 1 mg/d and was titrated as required to 2 or 4 mg at 4 and 9 weeks after initiation of treatment, respectively, in those not achieving BP targets. At 14 weeks after treatment initiation, subjects not achieving BP targets could receive a combination of trandolapril 4 mg plus a calcium channel blocker (verapamil 240 mg) with or without a diuretic. Primary outcome was the percentage of patients reaching target BP after 14 weeks.
A total of 1683 subjects from 192 general practice clinics across Canada completed the 14-week trandolapril dose-optimization phase, and 1650 completed the full 26-week follow-up. Mean (SD) age was 56.6 (12.6) years, and 49.2% of the subjects were men. At baseline, 82.4% (1359/1650) of subjects were antihypertensive-treatment naive. At the trial end, 73.4% (95% CI, 70.9-75.9) of subjects achieved a target level of SBP/DBP
PubMed ID
17472822 View in PubMed
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A 52-week prospective, cohort study of the effects of losartan with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145472
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
N. Racine
P. Hamet
J S Sampalis
N. Longo
N. Bastien
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Nov;24(11):739-48
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - chemically induced
Diuretics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hydrochlorothiazide - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hypertension - blood - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Linear Models
Losartan - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - complications - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The impact of an ARB, with or without hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), on glycaemic factors and the risk for developing diabetes in hypertensive patients with the metabolic syndrome have not been fully assessed. This was a 52-week multicentre, prospective, phase-IV, open-label, cohort study of losartan or losartan/HCTZ in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome. All subjects were treated initially with losartan 50?mg?day(-1). Those not achieving target blood pressure (BP
PubMed ID
20147971 View in PubMed
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Absence of sex differences in pharmacotherapy for acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179138
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jul;20(9):899-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Susan E Jelinski
William A Ghali
Gerry A Parsons
Colleen J Maxwell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jul;20(9):899-905
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Evaluation
Drug Therapy
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Patient Admission
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sex Factors
Urban health
Abstract
Previous studies have indicated that sex differences may exist in the pharmacological management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), with female patients being treated less aggressively.
To determine if previously reported sex differences in AMI medication use were also evident among all AMI patients treated at hospitals in an urban Canadian city.
All patients who had a primary discharge diagnosis of AMI from all three adult care hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, in the 1998/1999 fiscal year were identified from hospital administrative records (n=914). A standardized, detailed chart review was conducted. Information collected from the medical charts included sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular medication use during hospitalization and at discharge.
Similar proportions of female and male patients were treated with thrombolytics, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, nitrate, heparin, diuretics and digoxin. Among patients aged 75 years and over, a smaller proportion of female patients received acetylsalicylic acid in hospital than did male patients (87% versus 95%; P=0.026). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that, after correction for age, use of other anticoagulants/antiplatelets and death within 24 h of admission, sex was no longer an independent predictor for receipt of acetylsalicylic acid in hospital. Medications prescribed at discharge were similar between male and female patients.
The results from this Canadian chart review study, derived from detailed clinical data, indicate that the pattern of pharmacological treatment of female and male AMI patients during hospitalization and at discharge was very similar. No sex differences were evident in the treatment of AMI among patients treated in an urban Canadian centre.
PubMed ID
15266360 View in PubMed
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Acute treatment of myocardial infarction in Canada 1999-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176049
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Feb;21(2):145-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Cynthia A Jackevicius
David Alter
Jafna Cox
Paul Daly
Shaun Goodman
Woganee Filate
Alice Newman
Jack V Tu
Author Affiliation
Pharmacy Department, University Health Network-Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4. Cynthia.Jackevicius@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Feb;21(2):145-52
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - contraindications - therapeutic use
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - therapy
Myocardial Reperfusion - utilization
Patient Discharge
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
Therapy for management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) varies according to patient, prescriber and geographical characteristics.
To describe the in-hospital use of reperfusion therapy for ST elevation MI (STEMI) and discharge use of acetylsalicylic acid, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and statins in patients presenting with either STEMI or non-STEMI in Canada from 1999 to 2002.
Four Canadian registries (FASTRAK II, Canadian Acute Coronary Syndromes, Enhanced Feedback for Effective Cardiac Treatment and Improving Cardiovascular Outcomes in Nova Scotia) were used to identify patients with AMI in Canada and to measure in-hospital reperfusion and medication use. Use rates were compared by age, sex, time period and geographical area, according to available data.
Use rates for reperfusion in STEMI patients ranged from 60% to 70%, primarily representing fibrinolytic therapy. A delay in presentation to hospital after symptom onset represented an impediment to timely therapy, which was particularly pronounced for women and elderly patients. Overall, less than 50% of patients met the door-to-needle target of less than 30 min. Medication use rates at discharge increased from 1999/2000 to 2000/2001 across the different data sources: acetylsalicylic acid, 83% to 88%; beta-blockers, 74% to 89%; ACEIs, 54% to 67%; statins, 41% to 53%; and calcium antagonists, 21% to 32%.
Canadian and provincial rates of use of evidence-based medications for the treatment of AMI have increased over time, although there remains room for improvement. A single, comprehensive data source would supply better insights into the management of AMI in Canada.
PubMed ID
15729413 View in PubMed
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Age and gender differences in left ventricular function among patients with stable angina and a matched control group. A report from the Angina Prognosis Study in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11210
Source
Cardiology. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):287-93
Publication Type
Article
Author
S V Eriksson
I. Björkander
C. Held
P. Hjemdahl
L. Forslund
N. Rehnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Cardiology. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):287-93
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Aged
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Blood Pressure - physiology
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Echocardiography, Doppler
Electrocardiography
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Metoprolol - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Verapamil - therapeutic use
Abstract
To assess left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, M-mode (n = 675) and transmitral Doppler echocardiography (n = 358) were performed in patients with stable angina pectoris and compared with 50 matched healthy controls. Left ventricular fractional shortening (FS) was significantly lower in male than in female patients (32 +/- 7 vs. 35 +/- 7%, p
PubMed ID
8793161 View in PubMed
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Age- and gender-related differences in the use of secondary medical prevention after primary vascular surgery: a nationwide follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127996
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2012 Mar;43(3):300-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
A. Høgh
J S Lindholt
H. Nielsen
L P Jensen
S P Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, Regionshospitalet Viborg, Denmark. a_l_hogh@yahoo.dk
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2012 Mar;43(3):300-7
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - surgery
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Peripheral Arterial Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Secondary Prevention - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Vascular Surgical Procedures - utilization
Abstract
This study examined the possible age- and gender-related differences in the use of secondary medical prevention following primary vascular reconstruction in a population-based long-term follow-up study.
Using information from nationwide Danish registers, we identified all patients undergoing primary vascular reconstruction in-between 1996 and 2006 (n = 20,761). Data were obtained on all filled prescriptions 6 months and 3, 5 and 10 years after primary vascular reconstruction. Comparisons were made across age and gender groups, using men 40-60 years old as a reference.
Compared to current guidelines the overall use of secondary medical prevention was moderate to low (e.g., lipid-lowering drugs 49.5%, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ACE/ATII) 43.4%, combination of lipid-lowering drugs and anti-platelet therapy and any anti-hypertensive therapy 44.7%). A decline was observed between 6 months and 3 years after surgery. Patients >80 years old were less likely to be prescribed lipid-lowering drugs and combination therapy (e.g.: adjusted risk ratio (RR) 5 years after surgery for men and women 0.63 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.39-1.02) and 0.48 (95%CI: 0.31-0.75), respectively, whereas smaller and statistical non-significant gender-related differences were observed. The age- and gender-related differences appeared eliminated or substantially reduced in the latest part of the study period (2001-2007).
We found moderate to low use of secondary medical prevention in Denmark compared with recommendations from clinical guidelines. However, the use has increased in recent years and age- and gender-related differences have been reduced or even eliminated.
PubMed ID
22244910 View in PubMed
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[An overview of hypertension studies with calcium antagonists]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47980
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 20;119(13):1878-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1999
Author
S E Kjeldsen
K. Midtbø
I. Os
A. Westheim
Author Affiliation
Hjerte- og nyremedisinske avdelinger, Medisinsk Klinikk, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 May 20;119(13):1878-82
Date
May-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trials
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
English Abstract
Europe
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Multicenter Studies
Prospective Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Abstract
Calcium antagonists are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, few endpoint studies with calcium antagonists have been done to prove reduction in hypertensive complications. Results of the STONE, SYST-EUR and SYST-CHINA studies show that long-acting calcium antagonists are effective compared to placebo, especially in patients with isolated systolic hypertension and diabetes. Ongoing prospective and randomized trials like STOP II, INSIGHT, NORDIL, ALLHAT and ASCOT will clarify whether calcium antagonists are more effective than well-proven diuretics and betablockers. ASCOT will test the hypothesis that amlodipine is more efficacious than atenolol in preventing cardiac complications in 18,000 hypertensive patients with high coronary risk including diabetes (among them, 2,000 in Norway). The study is also randomizing the patients in a factorial design to either atorvastatin or placebo, testing the so-called lipid hypothesis.
PubMed ID
10382332 View in PubMed
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Antiarrhythmic use from 1991 to 2007: insights from the Canadian Registry of Atrial Fibrillation (CARAF I and II).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143905
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2010 Sep;7(9):1171-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Jason G Andrade
Stuart J Connolly
Paul Dorian
Martin Green
Karin H Humphries
George J Klein
Robert Sheldon
Mario Talajic
Charles R Kerr
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2010 Sep;7(9):1171-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Prospective Studies
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The pharmacologic management of atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, has been traditionally dichotomized into control of ventricular rate or re-establishment and maintenance of sinus rhythm.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of rate-controlling drugs and antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) in the Canadian Registry of Atrial Fibrillation (CARAF) over a 16-year period from 1991 through 2007.
1,400 patients with new-onset paroxysmal AF who were enrolled in CARAF were included in this analysis. We assessed trends in ventricular rate-controlling medication use (digoxin, beta-blockers, and calcium channel blockers) and AAD (class IA, IC, and III antiarrhythmic agents) at baseline and follow-up visits as well as by calendar year.
AAD use increased initially from 1991 to 1994 (peak use 42.5%) before steadily declining. Sotalol use decreased (27% to 6%), whereas amiodarone use increased (1.6% to 17.9%). Rate-controlling medication use decreased from 1991 to 1995 (54.1% to 34.1%) due to declining digoxin use (62.9% to 16.3%). After 1999, there was a continued increase in rate-controlling medication use (peak use 52.5% in 2007) due to increased beta-blocker use (17% to 45.7%). Calcium channel blockers use changed little over the duration of the study.
The management of AF has undergone significant shifts since 1990, reflecting the influence of drug development, prevailing belief systems, the impact of large clinical trials, and evidence-based recommendations. Monitoring of pharmacotherapy trends will provide insight into the real-world application of evidence-based guidelines as well as allow the opportunity to identify deficiencies and improve patient care.
PubMed ID
20430112 View in PubMed
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Antihypertensive drug prescribing and persistence among new elderly users: implications for persistence improvement interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104230
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 Jun;30(6):647-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Karen Tu
Laura N Anderson
Debra A Butt
Hude Quan
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Norm R Campbell
Finlay A McAlister
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; University Health Network-Toronto Western Hospital Family Health Team, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: karen.tu@ices.on.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 Jun;30(6):647-52
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Aged
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Income
Logistic Models
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Sodium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Stroke - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine persistence rates and factors influencing persistence for new elderly users of antihypertensive drugs.
We conducted a population-based cohort study in Ontario of adults aged 66 years or older to identify new users of antihypertensive medications between 1999 and 2010. Two-year therapy and class persistence were defined as persistence on any antihypertensive medication and persistence only on the same antihypertensive medication class, respectively.
From 1999-2010, the prevalence of antihypertensive drug use increased from 47.8%-60.5% (P
PubMed ID
24882536 View in PubMed
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Antihypertensive drug treatment in a Swedish community: Skaraborg Hypertension and Diabetes Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47547
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2002 Jan-Feb;11(1):45-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Erik Bøg-Hansen
Ulf Lindblad
Jonas Ranstam
Arne Melander
Lennart Råstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. fou-enheten.skara@swipnet.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2002 Jan-Feb;11(1):45-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Age Distribution
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Male
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe and compare the pattern of antihypertensive drug prescriptions during different time periods. METHODS: Antihypertensive prescriptions were registered in all patients who underwent an annual follow-up during 1998 (n = 984), 1992-1993 (n = 924), and 1981 (n = 689), at the hypertension outpatient clinic in primary health care, Skara, Sweden. RESULTS: From 1981 to 1998 the total prescriptions of thiazides declined from 61 to 10% (p
PubMed ID
11998551 View in PubMed
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94 records – page 1 of 10.