Skip header and navigation

Refine By

85 records – page 1 of 9.

25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in maternal and cord blood at delivery and in maternal blood during lactation in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240391
Source
Hum Nutr Clin Nutr. 1984 Jul;38(4):261-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1984
Author
C. Lamberg-Allardt
M. Larjosto
E. Schultz
Source
Hum Nutr Clin Nutr. 1984 Jul;38(4):261-8
Date
Jul-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcifediol - blood
Calcium - blood
Cholecalciferol - administration & dosage
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lactation
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Nutritional Requirements
Pregnancy
Seasons
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
The 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (25-OHD) in maternal and cord blood of 192 mothers was determined at delivery from June to the end of November. Ninety-nine mothers had received a daily supplementation of 12.5 micrograms of vitamin D during pregnancy and this group had a significantly higher 25-OHD concentration both in maternal and in cord blood than in the corresponding non-supplemented group. A daily supplement of 2.5 micrograms of vitamin D was given to 63 of the mothers during lactation. Of these mothers 44 were still lactating after 6 months. The dietary vitamin D intake of 31 mothers was calculated. We found a significant correlation between the maternal serum 25-OHD concentration 16-18 weeks after delivery and the total vitamin D intake. The intake (5.5 micrograms/d, including supplementation) was lower than that recommended for lactating mothers which is 10 micrograms/d (Food and Nutrition Board, 1980).
PubMed ID
6088438 View in PubMed
Less detail

The A1330V polymorphism of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene (LRP5) associates with low peak bone mass in young healthy men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165637
Source
Bone. 2007 Apr;40(4):1006-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Anne Saarinen
Ville-Valtteri Välimäki
Matti J Välimäki
Eliisa Löyttyniemi
Kirsi Auro
Piia Uusen
Mairi Kuris
Anna-Elina Lehesjoki
Outi Mäkitie
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics and Department of Medical Genetics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Bone. 2007 Apr;40(4):1006-12
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alleles
Bone Density - genetics
Calcifediol - blood
Finland
Fractures, Bone - etiology - genetics
Gene Frequency
Humans
LDL-Receptor Related Proteins - genetics
Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-5
Male
Military Personnel
Osteoporosis - etiology - genetics
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Risk factors
Abstract
Polymorphisms in the gene coding for low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) contribute to variation in bone mass in the general population. Whether this is due to influence on bone mass acquisition or on bone loss thereafter has not been established.
We studied the association of LRP5 polymorphisms with peak bone mass in young men. The study included 235 Finnish men, aged 18.3 to 20.6 years. Lifestyle factors and fracture history were recorded. Bone mineral content (BMC), density (BMD) and scan area were measured for the lumbar spine and proximal femur by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Blood and urine were collected for determination of bone turnover markers, serum 25-OHD and PTH. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood for genetic analysis of LRP5. Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms in LRP5 were analyzed and correlated with bone parameters.
Only the A1330V polymorphism of LRP5 significantly associated with bone parameters. In comparison with subjects with the AlaAla genotype (n=215), those with AlaVal genotype (n=20) had lower femoral neck BMC (P=0.029) and BMD (P=0.012), trochanter BMC (P=0.0067) and BMD (P=0.015), and total hip BMC (P=0.0044) and BMD (P=0.0089). Fracture history was similar for the genotypes.
The polymorphic valine variant at position 1330 of LRP5 was significantly associated with reduced BMC and BMD values in healthy young Finnish men. The results provide evidence for the crucial role of LRP5 in peak bone mass acquisition.
PubMed ID
17223614 View in PubMed
Less detail

An estimate of the economic burden and premature deaths due to vitamin D deficiency in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144580
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2010 Aug;54(8):1172-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
William B Grant
Gerry K Schwalfenberg
Stephen J Genuis
Susan J Whiting
Author Affiliation
Sunlight, Nutrition, and Health Research Center (SUNARC), San Francisco, CA 94164-1603, USA. wbgrant@infionline.net
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2010 Aug;54(8):1172-81
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Adult
Calcifediol - blood
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Health Care Costs
Humans
Infant
Male
Mortality
Nutrition Policy
Pregnancy
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - physiology
Vitamin D Deficiency - economics - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this work is to estimate the economic burden and premature death rate in Canada attributable to low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to many diseases and conditions in addition to bone diseases, including many types of cancer, several bacterial and viral infections, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Canadians have mean serum 25(OH)D levels averaging 67 nmol/L. The journal literature was searched for papers reporting dose-response relationships for vitamin D indices and disease outcomes. The types of studies useful in this regard include randomized controlled trials, observational, cross-sectional, and ecological studies, and meta-analyses. The mortality rates for 2005 were obtained from Statistics Canada. The economic burden data were obtained from Health Canada. The estimated benefits in disease reduction were based on increasing the mean serum 25(OH)D level to 105 nmol/L. It is estimated that the death rate could fall by 37,000 deaths (22,300-52,300 deaths), representing 16.1% (9.7-22.7%) of annuals deaths and the economic burden by 6.9% (3.8-10.0%) or $14.4 billion ($8.0 billion-$20.1 billion) less the cost of the program. It is recommended that Canadian health policy leaders consider measures to increase serum 25(OH)D levels for all Canadians.
PubMed ID
20352622 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are elderly Asians in Britain at a high risk of vitamin D deficiency and osteomalacia?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215659
Source
Age Ageing. 1995 Mar;24(2):103-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
T. Solanki
R H Hyatt
J R Kemm
E A Hughes
R A Cowan
Author Affiliation
Selly Oak Hospital, Birmingham.
Source
Age Ageing. 1995 Mar;24(2):103-7
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asia - ethnology
Calcifediol - blood
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteomalacia - blood - ethnology - prevention & control
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Risk factors
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Many studies have shown the indigenous elderly population and Asian immigrants to be groups at particular risk of vitamin D deficiency and osteomalacia, but there are no data on the risks in elderly Asians. In this community-based study a group of elderly Asians was compared with control groups of elderly and young whites and young Asians. Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OHD3) were significantly lower (p
PubMed ID
7793330 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels, physical activity, muscle strength and fractures in the prospective population-based OPRA Study of Elderly Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175928
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
P. Gerdhem
K A M Ringsberg
K J Obrant
K. Akesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. paul.gerdhem@skane.se
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1425-31
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Calcifediol - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Vitamin D supplements have been used to prevent fractures. The effect may be mediated through increased bone mass, but also through reduced falling propensity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels (25OHD), fall-associated variables (including tests of functional performance), and fracture in ambulatory women. At baseline 25OHD was measured in 986 women. Fall-associated variables were investigated at baseline. Fractures were recorded during a 3-year follow-up. Four percent of the women had 25OHD levels below 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/l), and 26% had 25OHD levels below 30 ng/ml (75 nmol/l). 25OHD correlated with gait speed (r =0.17, P
PubMed ID
15744449 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentration and risk of disease death in men: modification by magnesium intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263529
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;30(4):343-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Jaakko Mursu
Tarja Nurmi
Sari Voutilainen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;30(4):343-7
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Calcifediol - blood - deficiency
Cause of Death
Chromatography, Liquid
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Magnesium - administration & dosage - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
Low vitamin D status increases the risk of death. Magnesium plays an essential role in vitamin D metabolism and low magnesium intake may predispose to vitamin D deficiency and potentiate the health problems. We investigated whether magnesium intake modifies the serum 25(OH)D3 concentration and its associations with mortality in middle-aged and older men. We included 1892 men aged 42-60 years without cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline in 1984-1989 from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study. Serum 25(OH)D3 was measured with the high-performance liquid chromatography using coulometric electrode array detection. Magnesium intake was assessed with 4-day food recording. Deaths were ascertained by a computer linkage to the national cause of death register. Deaths due accidents and suicides were excluded. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to analyze the associations. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for death in the lowest (49.4 nmol/L) serum 25(OH)D3 tertile was 1.31 (95 % CI 1.07-1.60, Ptrend = 0.01). Stratified by the magnesium intake, the higher risk was observed only in the lower magnesium intake median (
PubMed ID
25762172 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between serum 25(OH)D concentrations and bone stress fractures in Finnish young men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167707
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2006 Sep;21(9):1483-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Juha-Petri Ruohola
Ilkka Laaksi
Timo Ylikomi
Riina Haataja
Ville M Mattila
Timo Sahi
Pentti Tuohimaa
Harri Pihlajamäki
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Military Medicine, Helsinki, Finland. j-p.ruohola@pp.inet.fi
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2006 Sep;21(9):1483-8
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Calcifediol - blood
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Muscles - physiology
Prospective Studies
Statistics as Topic
Stress, mechanical
Tensile Strength
Abstract
Low vitamin D level may predict rickets, osteomalacia, or osteoporosis. We examined serum 25(OH)D concentration as a predisposing factor for bone stress fracture in 756 military recruits. The average serum 25(OH)D concentration was significantly lower in the group with fracture, suggesting a relationship between vitamin D and fatigue bone stress fracture.
Low vitamin D level may predict rickets, osteomalacia, or osteoporosis. Fatigue bone stress fracture is one of the most frequently seen types of overuse injuries in athletes and military recruits. An association was recently shown between vitamin D and BMC. A correlation has also been found between low femoral BMD and stress fractures. We measured serum 25(OH)D concentration in a population sample of military recruits to determine if vitamin D is a predisposing factor for fatigue bone stress fracture.
We prospectively followed 800 randomly selected, healthy Finnish military recruits with a mean age of 19 years for developing stress fractures in homogenous circumstances. Blood for serum 25(OH)D concentration was drawn at entry into military service, and the weight, height, body mass index (BMI), muscle strength, and 12-minute running were measured for all subjects. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were measured with enzyme immunoassay. At end of the 90-day follow-up, 756 subjects completed the study. Subjects without fracture constituted controls.
Twenty-two recruits with stress fracture were identified (2.9%), the incidence being 11.6 (95% CI: 6.8-16.5) per 100 person-years. In the final multivariate analysis, the significant risk factor for stress fracture in conscripts was a below median serum 25(OH)D level (75.8 nM), OR being 3.6 (95% CI: 1.2-11.1). No significant associations between BMI (p = 0.255), age (p = 0.216), or smoking (p = 0.851) and bone stress fracture were found in this study population.
A lower level of serum 25(OH)D concentration may be a generally predisposing element for bone stress fractures. Considering the obvious need of additional vitamin D in prevention of stress fractures, the effects of vitamin D fortification of foods and supplementation will be subjects of interest for future research.
PubMed ID
16939407 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between vitamin D status and atherosclerosis among Inuit in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300399
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2018 01; 268:145-151
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Camilla U Gjødesen
Marit E Jørgensen
Peter Bjerregaard
Inger K Dahl-Petersen
Christina V L Larsen
Martin Noël
Mads Melbye
Arieh S Cohen
Marika Lundqvist
David M Hougaard
Jørn W Helge
Nina O Nielsen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: cugjoedesen@hotmail.com.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2018 01; 268:145-151
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Asymptomatic Diseases
Biomarkers - blood
Calcifediol - blood
Carotid Artery Diseases - diagnostic imaging - ethnology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - ethnology
Abstract
Low levels of vitamin D are suspected to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis among Inuit in Greenland, and to evaluate the association with vitamin D status. We hypothesized that low vitamin D status could be associated with higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) as a marker of atherosclerosis.
756 adults from the Inuit Health in Transition (IHIT) study carried out in Greenland in the period 2005-2010 were included. A blood sample donated in 1987 was available for a sub-sample of 102 individuals. Serum 25(OH)D3 from the IHIT study and the 1987 survey was used as a measure of vitamin D status. IMT measurements were conducted by ultrasound scanning. The prevalence of atherosclerosis was estimated, and the association between serum 25(OH)D3 and IMT measurements was examined by linear regression.
The overall prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis was 20.1% (n = 152). The linear regression analyses indicated a weak positive association between serum 25(OH)D3 level and IMT measurements from the IHIT study, though not statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (ß = 0.35% per 10 nmoL/L 25(OH)D3, p = 0.06). Linear regression analyses of the association between serum 25(OH)D3 level in the 1987 survey and IMT measurements also indicated a positive, though not statistically significant, association after adjustment (ß = 0.07% per 10 nmoL/L 25(OH)D3, p = 0.86).
Our findings did not support the hypothesis of an association between low vitamin D levels and risk of atherosclerosis.
PubMed ID
29227867 View in PubMed
Less detail

Both high and low levels of blood vitamin D are associated with a higher prostate cancer risk: a longitudinal, nested case-control study in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18093
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Jan 1;108(1):104-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2004
Author
Pentti Tuohimaa
Leena Tenkanen
Merja Ahonen
Sonja Lumme
Egil Jellum
Göran Hallmans
Pär Stattin
Sverre Harvei
Timo Hakulinen
Tapio Luostarinen
Joakim Dillner
Matti Lehtinen
Matti Hakama
Author Affiliation
Medical School, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Pentti.Tuohimaa@uta.fi
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Jan 1;108(1):104-8
Date
Jan-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Calcifediol - blood
Case-Control Studies
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications
Abstract
Vitamin D inhibits the development and growth of prostate cancer cells. Epidemiologic results on serum vitamin D levels and prostate cancer risk have, however, been inconsistent. We conducted a longitudinal nested case-control study on Nordic men (Norway, Finland and Sweden) using serum banks of 200,000 samples. We studied serum 25(OH)-vitamin D levels of 622 prostate cancer cases and 1,451 matched controls and found that both low (/=80 nmol/l) 25(OH)-vitamin D serum concentrations are associated with higher prostate cancer risk. The normal average serum concentration of 25(OH)-vitamin D (40-60 nmol/l) comprises the lowest risk of prostate cancer. The U-shaped risk of prostate cancer might be due to similar 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) availability within the prostate: low vitamin D serum concentration apparently leads to a low tissue concentration and to weakened mitotic control of target cells, whereas a high vitamin D level might lead to vitamin D resistance through increased inactivation by enhanced expression of 24-hydroxylase. It is recommended that vitamin D deficiency be supplemented, but too high vitamin D serum level might also enhance cancer development.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2004 Sep 1;111(3):468; author reply 46915221979
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2004 Sep 1;111(3):470-1; author reply 47215221981
PubMed ID
14618623 View in PubMed
Less detail

The change in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D did not differ between breast-fed infants that received a daily supplement of ergocalciferol or cholecalciferol for 3 months.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117894
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Feb;143(2):148-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Sina Gallo
Anna Phan
Catherine A Vanstone
Celia Rodd
Hope A Weiler
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Feb;143(2):148-53
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Adult
Breast Feeding
Calcifediol - blood
Cholecalciferol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Dietary Supplements
Ergocalciferols - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunoassay
Infant
Intention to Treat Analysis
Male
Patient compliance
Quebec - epidemiology
Remission Induction
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The biological equivalency of ergocalciferol (D2) and cholecalciferol (D3) has been debated; several comparisons have appeared in the adult literature but are scarce in pediatrics. The objective of this study was to compare increases in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and attainment of 50 and 75 mol/L status cutoffs following 3 mo of daily supplementation with D2 compared with D3. Healthy, breast-fed, 1-mo-old infants (n = 52) received 10 µg (400 ic) of either D2 or D3 daily. At 1 and 4 mo of age, plasma 25-hydroxyergocalciferol and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) and total 25(OH)D by chemiluminescent immunoassay (DiaSorin Liaison). Data were analyzed using t tests and ?² by intent to treat. A total of 23% of infants were deficient (=24.9 nmol/L) at baseline and 2% at follow-up on the basis of LC-MS/MS. At 4 mo, 96% were breastfed and there were no differences in compliance, breastfeeding rates, or sun exposure among groups. The change in total 25(OH)D measured by LC-MS/MS did not differ between the D2 (17.6 ± 26.7 nmol/L) and D3 (22.2 ± 20.2 nmol/L) groups. In the combined groups, the baseline plasma 25(OH)D concentration was inversely related to the change in total 25(OH)D (r = -0.52; P
Notes
Cites: Ann Clin Biochem. 2008 Mar;45(Pt 2):153-918325178
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Mar;93(3):677-8118089691
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Mar;92(3):938-4117164299
Cites: Pigment Cell Res. 2006 Dec;19(6):606-1417083487
Cites: Med J Aust. 2006 Sep 4;185(5):268-7216948623
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Aug;91(8):3055-6116720650
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2006 Aug;116(8):2062-7216886050
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Nov;89(11):5387-9115531486
Cites: Physiol Rev. 1998 Oct;78(4):1193-2319790574
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Oct;68(4):854-89771862
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1997 Mar;65(3):771-89062528
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1996 Apr;81(4):1385-88636338
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2008 Jul;391(5):1917-3018437365
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Jul;93(7):2716-2118413426
Cites: Pediatrics. 2008 Nov;122(5):1142-5218977996
Cites: Matern Child Nutr. 2009 Jan;5(1):25-3219161542
Cites: J Pediatr. 1982 Jun;100(6):919-226979622
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Aug;97(8):2699-70522585090
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Jun;95(6):1357-6422552031
Cites: Health Rep. 2010 Mar;21(1):47-5520426226
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Dec;38(6):1674-8019667054
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2004 Feb;74(2):150-614648011
Cites: J Nutr. 2012 Sep;142(9):1705-1222833661
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1984 Oct;59(4):719-266541227
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1988 Aug;67(2):373-82839537
Cites: J Pediatr. 1992 May;120(5):733-91578308
PubMed ID
23256143 View in PubMed
Less detail

85 records – page 1 of 9.