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Caffeine and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter: the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17161
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):578-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Lars Frost
Peter Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Lars.Frost@as.aaa.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):578-82
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - etiology
Atrial Flutter - epidemiology - etiology
Cacao - chemistry
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - analysis
Coffee - chemistry
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea - chemistry
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is not known whether the consumption of caffeine is associated with excess risk of atrial fibrillation. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in association with daily consumption of caffeine from coffee, tea, cola, cocoa, and chocolate. DESIGN: We prospectively examined the association between the amount of caffeine consumed per day and the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter among 47 949 participants (x age: 56 y) in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. Subjects were followed in the Danish National Registry of Patients and in the Danish Civil Registration System. The consumption of caffeine was analyzed by quintiles with Cox proportional-hazard models. RESULTS: During follow-up (x: 5.7 y), atrial fibrillation or flutter developed in 555 subjects (373 men and 182 women). When the lowest quintile of caffeine consumption was used as a reference, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% CIs) in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.12 (0.87, 1.44), 0.85 (0.65, 1.12), 0.92 (0.71, 1.20), and 0.91 (0.70, 1.19), respectively. CONCLUSION: Consumption of caffeine was not associated with risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):539-4015755819
PubMed ID
15755825 View in PubMed
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Caffeine intake and the risk of first-trimester spontaneous abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63874
Source
N Engl J Med. 2000 Dec 21;343(25):1839-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-2000
Author
S. Cnattingius
L B Signorello
G. Annerén
B. Clausson
A. Ekbom
E. Ljunger
W J Blot
J K McLaughlin
G. Petersson
A. Rane
F. Granath
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
N Engl J Med. 2000 Dec 21;343(25):1839-45
Date
Dec-21-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - chemically induced
Adolescent
Adult
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Disorders
Coffee - adverse effects
Female
Fetus
Gestational Age
Humans
Karyotyping
Multivariate Analysis
Nausea
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some epidemiologic studies have suggested that the ingestion of caffeine increases the risk of spontaneous abortion, but the results have been inconsistent. METHODS: We performed a population-based, case-control study of early spontaneous abortion in Uppsala County, Sweden. The subjects were 562 women who had spontaneous abortion at 6 to 12 completed weeks of gestation (the case patients) and 953 women who did not have spontaneous abortion and were matched to the case patients according to the week of gestation (controls). Information on the ingestion of caffeine was obtained from in-person interviews. Plasma cotinine was measured as an indicator of cigarette smoking, and fetal karyotypes were determined from tissue samples. Multivariate analysis was used to estimate the relative risks associated with caffeine ingestion after adjustment for smoking and symptoms of pregnancy such as nausea, vomiting, and tiredness. RESULTS: Among nonsmokers, more spontaneous abortions occurred in women who ingested at least 100 mg of caffeine per day than in women who ingested less than 100 mg per day, with the increase in risk related to the amount ingested (100 to 299 mg per day: odds ratio, 1.3; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.9 to 1.8; 300 to 499 mg per day: odds ratio, 1.4; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.9 to 2.0; and 500 mg or more per day: odds ratio, 2.2; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.3 to 3.8). Among smokers, caffeine ingestion was not associated with an excess risk of spontaneous abortion. When the analyses were stratified according to the results of karyotyping, the ingestion of moderate or high levels of caffeine was found to be associated with an excess risk of spontaneous abortion when the fetus had a normal or unknown karyotype but not when the fetal karyotype was abnormal. CONCLUSIONS: The ingestion of caffeine may increase the risk of an early spontaneous abortion among non-smoking women carrying fetuses with normal karyotypes.
PubMed ID
11117975 View in PubMed
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Catechol-o-methyltransferase gene polymorphism modifies the effect of coffee intake on incidence of acute coronary events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165792
Source
PLoS One. 2006;1:e117
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Pertti Happonen
Sari Voutilainen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jukka T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. pertti.happonen@uku.fi
Source
PLoS One. 2006;1:e117
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Base Sequence
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Catechol O-Methyltransferase - genetics - metabolism
Catecholamines - metabolism
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - enzymology - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
DNA Primers - genetics
Epinephrine - urine
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - enzymology - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The role of coffee intake as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) has been debated for decades. We examined whether the relationship between coffee intake and incidence of CHD events is dependent on the metabolism of circulating catecholamines, as determined by functional polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene.
In a cohort of 773 men who were 42 to 60 years old and free of symptomatic CHD at baseline in 1984-89, 78 participants experienced an acute coronary event during an average follow-up of 13 years. In logistic regression adjusting for age, smoking, family history of CHD, vitamin C deficiency, blood pressure, plasma cholesterol concentration, and diabetes, the odds ratio (90% confidence interval) comparing heavy coffee drinkers with the low activity COMT genotype with those with the high activity or heterozygotic genotypes was 3.2 (1.2-8.4). Urinary adrenaline excretion increased with increasing coffee intake, being over two-fold in heavy drinkers compared with nondrinkers (p = 0.008 for trend).
Heavy coffee consumption increases the incidence of acute coronary events in men with low but not high COMT activity. Further studies are required to determine to which extent circulating catecholamines mediate the relationship between coffee intake and CHD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17205121 View in PubMed
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High coffee intake, but not caffeine, is associated with reduced estrogen receptor negative and postmenopausal breast cancer risk with no effect modification by CYP1A2 genotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115212
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2013;65(3):398-409
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Elizabeth C Lowcock
Michelle Cotterchio
Laura N Anderson
Beatrice A Boucher
Ahmed El-Sohemy
Author Affiliation
Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. beth.lowcock@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2013;65(3):398-409
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Coffee
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2 - genetics
Diet
Female
Genotype
Humans
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Postmenopause
Receptors, Estrogen - analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
Associations between caffeine and coffee consumption and breast cancer risk are uncertain, with studies suggesting inverse and null associations. Variation in cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), a gene responsible for caffeine metabolism, may modify these associations. Cases (n = 3,062) were recruited through the Ontario Cancer Registry and controls (n = 3,427) through random digit dialing. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between breast cancer risk and intakes of 7 caffeine-containing items and total caffeine, and examine whether a genetic variant in CYP1A2 (rs762551) modified these associations. Analyses were stratified by estrogen receptor (ER), menopausal, and smoking status. Generally, coffee and caffeine were not associated with breast cancer risk; however, a significant reduction in risk was observed with the highest category of coffee consumption [=5 cups per day vs. never, multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (MVOR) = 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.51, 0.98]. Variant rs762551 did not modify associations. In stratified analyses, high coffee intake was associated with reduced risk of ER- (MVOR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.19, 0.92) and postmenopausal breast cancer (MVOR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.43, 0.94). High coffee consumption, but not total caffeine, may be associated with reduced risk of ER- and postmenopausal breast cancers, independent of CYP1A2 genotype. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings.
PubMed ID
23530639 View in PubMed
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Intake of Caffeinated Soft Drinks before and during Pregnancy, but Not Total Caffeine Intake, Is Associated with Increased Cerebral Palsy Risk in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283700
Source
J Nutr. 2016 Sep;146(9):1701-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Mette C Tollånes
Katrine Strandberg-Larsen
Kacey Y Eichelberger
Dag Moster
Rolv Terje Lie
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Camilla Stoltenberg
Allen J Wilcox
Source
J Nutr. 2016 Sep;146(9):1701-6
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight - growth & development
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Postnatal administration of caffeine may reduce the risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in vulnerable low-birth-weight neonates. The effect of antenatal caffeine exposure remains unknown.
We investigated the association of intake of caffeine by pregnant women and risk of CP in their children.
The study was based on The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, comprising >100,000 live-born children, of whom 222 were subsequently diagnosed with CP. Mothers reported their caffeine consumption in questionnaires completed around pregnancy week 17 (102,986 mother-child pairs), week 22 (87,987 mother-child pairs), and week 30 (94,372 mother-child pairs). At week 17, participants were asked about present and prepregnancy consumption. We used Cox regression models to estimate associations between exposure [daily servings (1 serving = 125 mL) of caffeinated coffee, tea, and soft drinks and total caffeine consumption] and CP in children, with nonconsumers as the reference group. Models included adjustment for maternal age and education, medically assisted reproduction, and smoking, and for each source of caffeine, adjustments were made for the other sources.
Total daily caffeine intake before and during pregnancy was not associated with CP risk. High consumption (=6 servings/d) of caffeinated soft drinks before pregnancy was associated with an increased CP risk (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2, 3.1), and children of women consuming 3-5 daily servings of caffeinated soft drinks during pregnancy weeks 13-30 also had an increased CP risk (HR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.8). A mean daily consumption of 51-100 mg caffeine from soft drinks during the first half of pregnancy was associated with a 1.9-fold increased risk of CP in children (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6).
Maternal total daily caffeine consumption before and during pregnancy was not associated with CP risk in children. The observed increased risk with caffeinated soft drinks warrants further investigation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27489007 View in PubMed
Less detail

Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy and childhood growth and overweight: results from a large Norwegian prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296615
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 04 23; 8(3):e018895
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-23-2018
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Jérémie Botton
Anne-Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Jonas Bacelis
Anders Elfvin
Bo Jacobsson
Verena Sengpiel
Author Affiliation
Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Department of Environmental Exposure and Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 04 23; 8(3):e018895
Date
04-23-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Child
Child Development - drug effects
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diet Records
Eating
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Norway
Overweight - chemically induced - etiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - etiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
To study the association between maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy and the child's weight gain and overweight risk up to 8 years.
Prospective nationwide pregnancy cohort.
The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.
A total of 50?943 mothers recruited from 2002 to 2008 and their children, after singleton pregnancies, with information about average caffeine intake assessed at mid-pregnancy.
Child's body size information at 11 age points from 6 weeks to 8 years. We defined excess growth in infancy as a WHO weight gain z-score of >0.67 from birth to age 1?year, and overweight according to the International Obesity Task Force. We used a growth model to assess individual growth trajectories.
Compared with pregnant women with low caffeine intake (200?mg/day had consistently higher weight. Very high caffeine exposures were associated with higher weight gain velocity from infancy to age 8 years.
Any caffeine consumption during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of excess infant growth and of childhood overweight, mainly at preschool ages. Maternal caffeine intake may modify the overall weight growth trajectory of the child from birth to 8 years. This study adds supporting evidence for the current advice to reduce caffeine intake during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
29685923 View in PubMed
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Relation between fractures and mortality: results from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149306
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Sep 1;181(5):265-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2009
Author
George Ioannidis
Alexandra Papaioannou
Wilma M Hopman
Noori Akhtar-Danesh
Tassos Anastassiades
Laura Pickard
Courtney C Kennedy
Jerilynn C Prior
Wojciech P Olszynski
Kenneth S Davison
David Goltzman
Lehana Thabane
Amiran Gafni
Emmanuel A Papadimitropoulos
Jacques P Brown
Robert G Josse
David A Hanley
Jonathan D Adachi
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. g.ioannidis@sympatico.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2009 Sep 1;181(5):265-71
Date
Sep-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Central Nervous System Stimulants - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Hip Fractures - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Sex Factors
Smoking - mortality
Spinal Fractures - mortality
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Fractures have largely been assessed by their impact on quality of life or health care costs. We conducted this study to evaluate the relation between fractures and mortality.
A total of 7753 randomly selected people (2187 men and 5566 women) aged 50 years and older from across Canada participated in a 5-year observational cohort study. Incident fractures were identified on the basis of validated self-report and were classified by type (vertebral, pelvic, forearm or wrist, rib, hip and "other"). We subdivided fracture groups by the year in which the fracture occurred during follow-up; those occurring in the fourth and fifth years were grouped together. We examined the relation between the time of the incident fracture and death.
Compared with participants who had no fracture during follow-up, those who had a vertebral fracture in the second year were at increased risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-6.6); also at risk were those who had a hip fracture during the first year (adjusted HR 3.2, 95% CI 1.4-7.4). Among women, the risk of death was increased for those with a vertebral fracture during the first year (adjusted HR 3.7, 95% CI 1.1-12.8) or the second year of follow-up (adjusted HR 3.2, 95% CI 1.2-8.1). The risk of death was also increased among women with hip fracture during the first year of follow-up (adjusted HR 3.0, 95% CI 1.0-8.7).
Vertebral and hip fractures are associated with an increased risk of death. Interventions that reduce the incidence of these fractures need to be implemented to improve survival.
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2009 Sep 1;181(5):247-819654191
PubMed ID
19654194 View in PubMed
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[The treatment of hyperemesis gravidarum with chlorobutanol-caffeine rectal suppositories in Denmark: practice and evidence]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77490
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 May 28;169(22):2122-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-2007
Author
Brødbaek Herdis Bohn Olesen
Damkier Per
Author Affiliation
Universitetshospital, Afdeling for Biokemi, Farmakologi og Genetik. bohn@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 May 28;169(22):2122-3
Date
May-28-2007
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiemetics - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Chlorobutanol - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Drug Combinations
Drug Utilization
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Hyperemesis Gravidarum - drug therapy
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Safety
Suppositories
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: In Denmark chlorobutanol-caffeine rectal suppositories are prescribed by some obstetric departments for the treatment of hyperemesis gravidarum. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have investigated the extent of this use by questionnaire, and we have performed a literature review on the evidence of efficacy and safety. RESULTS: The use of chlorobutanol-caffeine rectal suppositories was reported by 5 out of 28 obstetric departments in Denmark. The literature search revealed that there is very sparse information on chlorobutanol. No evidence was found of safety during pregnancy in humans or efficiency as antiemetic treatment in hyperemesis gravidarum. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence of the efficacy or safety of chlorobutanol-caffeine suppositories for the treatment of hyperemesis gravidarum.
PubMed ID
17553397 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.