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Adjustment of sleep and the circadian temperature rhythm after flights across nine time zones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12303
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1989 Aug;60(8):733-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
P H Gander
G. Myhre
R C Graeber
H T Andersen
J K Lauber
Author Affiliation
Aviation Systems Research Branch, NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035.
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1989 Aug;60(8):733-43
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine
Alcohol Drinking
Body Temperature Regulation
Caffeine - administration & dosage
Circadian Rhythm
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Monitoring, Physiologic
Norway
Personality Assessment
Reference Values
Sleep - physiology
Abstract
The adjustment of sleep-wake patterns and the circadian temperature rhythm was monitored in nine Royal Norwegian Air-force volunteers operating P-3 aircraft during a westward training deployment across nine time zones. Subjects recorded all sleep and nap times, rated nightly sleep quality, and completed personality inventories. Rectal temperature, heart rate, and wrist activity were continuously monitored. Adjustment was slower after the return eastward flight than after the outbound westward flight. The eastward flight produced slower readjustment of sleep timing to local time and greater interindividual variability in the patterns of adjustment of sleep and temperature. One subject apparently exhibited resynchronization by partition, with the temperature rhythm undergoing the reciprocal 15-h delay. In contrast, average heart rates during sleep were significantly elevated only after westward flight. Interindividual differences in adjustment of the temperature rhythm were correlated with some of the personality measures. Larger phase delays in the overall temperature waveform (as measured on the 5th day after westward flight) were exhibited by extraverts, and less consistently by evening types.
PubMed ID
2775129 View in PubMed
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Associations between night work and BMI, alcohol, smoking, caffeine and exercise--a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272476
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:1112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Hogne Vikanes Buchvold
Ståle Pallesen
Nicolas M F Øyane
Bjørn Bjorvatn
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:1112
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Caffeine - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sleep
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Work Schedule Tolerance
Young Adult
Abstract
Shift work is associated with negative health effects. Increased prevalence of several cardiovascular risk factors among shift workers/night workers compared with day workers have been shown resulting in increased risk of cardiovascular events among shift workers and night workers. Previous studies have taken a dichotomous approach to the comparison between day and night workers. The present study uses a continuous approach and provides such a new perspective to the negative effects of night work load as a possible risk factor for undesirable health effects.
This cross sectional study (The SUrvey of Shift work, Sleep and Health (SUSSH)) uses data collected from December 2008 to March 2009. The study population consists of Norwegian nurses. The study collected information about demographic and lifestyle factors: Body Mass Index (BMI), smoking habits, alcohol consumption, caffeine consumption and exercise habits. The lifestyle parameters were evaluated using multiple hierarchical regression and binary logistic regression. Number of night shifts worked last year (NNL) was used as operationalization of night work load. Adjustment for possible confounders were made. Obesity was defined as BMI > 30. Alcohol Consumption was evaluated using the short form of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Consumption (AUDIT-C). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 22.
We had data from 2059 nurses. NNL was significantly and positively associated with BMI, both when evaluated against BMI as a continuous parameter (Beta = .055, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
26558686 View in PubMed
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Beverage caffeine intakes in young children in Canada and the US.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168912
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006;67(2):96-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Carol A Knight
Ian Knight
Diane C Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Knight International, Chicago, IL, USA.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006;67(2):96-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Caffeine - administration & dosage - analysis
Canada
Carbonated Beverages - analysis
Central Nervous System Stimulants - administration & dosage - analysis
Child, Preschool
Coffee - chemistry
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Tea - chemistry
United States
Abstract
Throughout childhood there is a shift from predominantly milk-based beverage consumption to other types of beverages, including those containing caffeine. Although a variety of health effects in children and adults have been attributed to caffeine, few data exist on caffeine intake in children aged one to five years.
Because beverages provide about 80% of total caffeine consumed in children of this age group, beverage consumption patterns and caffeine intakes were evaluated from two beverage marketing surveys: the 2001 Canadian Facts study and the 1999 United States Share of Intake Panel study.
Considerably fewer Canadian children than American children consume caffeinated beverages (36% versus 56%); Canadian children consume approximately half the amount of caffeine (7 versus 14 mg/day in American children). Differences were largely because of higher intakes of carbonated soft drinks in the US.
Caffeine intakes from caffeinated beverages remain well within safe levels for consumption by young children.
PubMed ID
16759437 View in PubMed
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Caffeine and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter: the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17161
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):578-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Lars Frost
Peter Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Lars.Frost@as.aaa.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):578-82
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - etiology
Atrial Flutter - epidemiology - etiology
Cacao - chemistry
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - analysis
Coffee - chemistry
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea - chemistry
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is not known whether the consumption of caffeine is associated with excess risk of atrial fibrillation. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in association with daily consumption of caffeine from coffee, tea, cola, cocoa, and chocolate. DESIGN: We prospectively examined the association between the amount of caffeine consumed per day and the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter among 47 949 participants (x age: 56 y) in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. Subjects were followed in the Danish National Registry of Patients and in the Danish Civil Registration System. The consumption of caffeine was analyzed by quintiles with Cox proportional-hazard models. RESULTS: During follow-up (x: 5.7 y), atrial fibrillation or flutter developed in 555 subjects (373 men and 182 women). When the lowest quintile of caffeine consumption was used as a reference, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% CIs) in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.12 (0.87, 1.44), 0.85 (0.65, 1.12), 0.92 (0.71, 1.20), and 0.91 (0.70, 1.19), respectively. CONCLUSION: Consumption of caffeine was not associated with risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):539-4015755819
PubMed ID
15755825 View in PubMed
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Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 1996 Jan;34(1):119-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
J J Barone
H R Roberts
Author Affiliation
Coca-Cola Company, Atlanta, GA 30313, USA.
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 1996 Jan;34(1):119-29
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Australia
Beverages
Cacao
Caffeine - administration & dosage
Child
Child, Preschool
Coffee
Denmark
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Tea
United States
United States Department of Agriculture
Abstract
Scientific literature cites a wide range of values for caffeine content in food products. The authors suggest the following standard values for the United States: coffee (5 oz) 85 mg for ground roasted coffee, 60 mg for instant and 3 mg for decaffeinated; tea (5 oz): 30 mg for leaf/bag and 20 mg for instant; colas: 18 mg/6 oz serving; cocoa/hot chocolate: 4 mg/5 oz; chocolate milk: 4 mg/6 oz; chocolate candy: 1.5-6.0 mg/oz. Some products from the United Kingdom and Denmark have higher caffeine content. Caffeine consumption survey data are limited. Based on product usage and available consumption data, the authors suggest a mean daily caffeine intake for US consumers of 4 mg/kg. Among children younger than 18 years of age who are consumers of caffeine-containing foods, the mean daily caffeine intake is about 1 mg/kg. Both adults and children in Denmark and UK have higher levels of caffeine intake.
PubMed ID
8603790 View in PubMed
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Caffeine intake and the risk of first-trimester spontaneous abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63874
Source
N Engl J Med. 2000 Dec 21;343(25):1839-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-2000
Author
S. Cnattingius
L B Signorello
G. Annerén
B. Clausson
A. Ekbom
E. Ljunger
W J Blot
J K McLaughlin
G. Petersson
A. Rane
F. Granath
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
N Engl J Med. 2000 Dec 21;343(25):1839-45
Date
Dec-21-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - chemically induced
Adolescent
Adult
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Disorders
Coffee - adverse effects
Female
Fetus
Gestational Age
Humans
Karyotyping
Multivariate Analysis
Nausea
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some epidemiologic studies have suggested that the ingestion of caffeine increases the risk of spontaneous abortion, but the results have been inconsistent. METHODS: We performed a population-based, case-control study of early spontaneous abortion in Uppsala County, Sweden. The subjects were 562 women who had spontaneous abortion at 6 to 12 completed weeks of gestation (the case patients) and 953 women who did not have spontaneous abortion and were matched to the case patients according to the week of gestation (controls). Information on the ingestion of caffeine was obtained from in-person interviews. Plasma cotinine was measured as an indicator of cigarette smoking, and fetal karyotypes were determined from tissue samples. Multivariate analysis was used to estimate the relative risks associated with caffeine ingestion after adjustment for smoking and symptoms of pregnancy such as nausea, vomiting, and tiredness. RESULTS: Among nonsmokers, more spontaneous abortions occurred in women who ingested at least 100 mg of caffeine per day than in women who ingested less than 100 mg per day, with the increase in risk related to the amount ingested (100 to 299 mg per day: odds ratio, 1.3; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.9 to 1.8; 300 to 499 mg per day: odds ratio, 1.4; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.9 to 2.0; and 500 mg or more per day: odds ratio, 2.2; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.3 to 3.8). Among smokers, caffeine ingestion was not associated with an excess risk of spontaneous abortion. When the analyses were stratified according to the results of karyotyping, the ingestion of moderate or high levels of caffeine was found to be associated with an excess risk of spontaneous abortion when the fetus had a normal or unknown karyotype but not when the fetal karyotype was abnormal. CONCLUSIONS: The ingestion of caffeine may increase the risk of an early spontaneous abortion among non-smoking women carrying fetuses with normal karyotypes.
PubMed ID
11117975 View in PubMed
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Caffeine N3-demethylation (CYP1A2) in a population with an increased exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166669
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2006 Dec;62(12):1041-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Maria Skaalum Petersen
Jónrit Halling
Per Damkier
Flemming Nielsen
Philippe Grandjean
Pál Weihe
Kim Brøsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslovparken 17, 5000 Odense C, Denmark. mskaalum@health.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2006 Dec;62(12):1041-8
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adult
Biometry
Caffeine - administration & dosage - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A2 - genetics - metabolism
Environmental Pollutants - chemistry - metabolism - poisoning
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Methylation
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - chemistry - metabolism - poisoning
Sex Factors
Smoking - metabolism
Uracil - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Uric Acid - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Xanthines - metabolism
Abstract
To investigate the CYP1A2 phenotype distribution in a population with an increased exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that would likely induce an increased activity of this enzyme. Further, to investigate the effect of sex, smoking, and oral contraceptive use on the CYP1A2 activity.
In 305 randomly selected Faroese residents aged 18-60 years, the CYP1A2 activity was determined following oral intake of a caffeine dose and subsequent determination of the urinary metabolites and calculation of the caffeine metabolic ratio (CMR). PCB exposure was assessed by measuring the serum concentration of major congeners.
The CYP1A2 phenotype distribution was unimodal. The CMR was significantly higher both in smoking men and in smoking women, independent of oral contraceptive use, as compared with non-smokers. Among non-smokers, the CMR was significantly higher in women not using oral contraceptives than in those using oral contraceptives; a similar difference could not be established among smokers. The CMR appeared higher in men than in women, but stratified analyses confirmed a significant sex-related difference only among smokers not using oral contraceptives. Overall, the mean CMR in Faroese was significantly higher compared with the mean CMR in Danish historical controls. No association was found with PCB exposure and individual PCB congeners, except for one of three dioxin-like congeners, in confounder-adjusted multiple regression analyses.
The CYP1A2 phenotype in Faroese residents was unimodally distributed and showed the inducing effect of smoking and the inhibiting effect of use of oral contraceptives, but a sex-related difference was not apparent after confounder adjustment. There was no statistically significant association between CMR and PCB exposure.
PubMed ID
17089110 View in PubMed
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Catechol-o-methyltransferase gene polymorphism modifies the effect of coffee intake on incidence of acute coronary events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165792
Source
PLoS One. 2006;1:e117
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Pertti Happonen
Sari Voutilainen
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Jukka T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. pertti.happonen@uku.fi
Source
PLoS One. 2006;1:e117
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Base Sequence
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Catechol O-Methyltransferase - genetics - metabolism
Catecholamines - metabolism
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - enzymology - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
DNA Primers - genetics
Epinephrine - urine
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - enzymology - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The role of coffee intake as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) has been debated for decades. We examined whether the relationship between coffee intake and incidence of CHD events is dependent on the metabolism of circulating catecholamines, as determined by functional polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene.
In a cohort of 773 men who were 42 to 60 years old and free of symptomatic CHD at baseline in 1984-89, 78 participants experienced an acute coronary event during an average follow-up of 13 years. In logistic regression adjusting for age, smoking, family history of CHD, vitamin C deficiency, blood pressure, plasma cholesterol concentration, and diabetes, the odds ratio (90% confidence interval) comparing heavy coffee drinkers with the low activity COMT genotype with those with the high activity or heterozygotic genotypes was 3.2 (1.2-8.4). Urinary adrenaline excretion increased with increasing coffee intake, being over two-fold in heavy drinkers compared with nondrinkers (p = 0.008 for trend).
Heavy coffee consumption increases the incidence of acute coronary events in men with low but not high COMT activity. Further studies are required to determine to which extent circulating catecholamines mediate the relationship between coffee intake and CHD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17205121 View in PubMed
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Challenges of nutrition recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227172
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Jan 1;144(1):46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1991

Cigarette smoking, tea and coffee drinking, and subfecundity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65078
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Apr 1;133(7):734-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1991
Author
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Apr 1;133(7):734-9
Date
Apr-1-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caffeine - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Coffee
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Fertility - drug effects
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Tea
Time Factors
Abstract
A population-based survey of life-style factors and subfecundity (prolonged time to pregnancy) was conducted between 1984 and 1987 in two cities in Denmark. Altogether, 11,888 women filled out a questionnaire in the last trimester of pregnancy (an 86 percent response rate). After exclusion of women who had been treated for infertility or who did not respond to the question on infertility, 10,886 subjects remained. Among nonsmokers, no association was found between subfecundity (defined as a waiting time of 1 year or more from cessation of contraception to achievement of pregnancy) and consumption of hot caffeinated beverages. For women who smoked and also consumed at least 8 cups of coffee per day (or an equivalent amount of tea), a statistically significant association was seen (odds ratio = 1.35, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.48) for a wait of 1 year or more. Consumption of coffee was closely related to smoking habits and to a number of social factors, such as education and peer group acceptance, which may play a role in subfecundity.
PubMed ID
2018028 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.