Skip header and navigation

Refine By

46 records – page 1 of 5.

Acidic deposition and human exposure to toxic metals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234401
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1987 Dec;67(2-3):101-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
B G Svensson
A. Björnham
A. Schütz
U. Lettevall
A. Nilsson
S. Skerfving
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1987 Dec;67(2-3):101-15
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cadmium - blood
Environmental Exposure
Health status
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Lead - blood
Life Style
Mercury - blood
Metals - analysis - blood
Questionnaires
Selenium - blood
Sweden
Water Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Acid precipitation affects the solubility of several metals in aquatic systems and in soil. Cadmium levels in tap water samples from geological areas having low resistance to acidic pollution were significantly higher than those in samples from a neighbouring reference area where there was a different geological structure. The median cadmium levels and pH values were 0.14 microgram l-1 and 5.6 respectively, for the acidic areas compared with 0.07 microgram l-1 and 6.4 respectively for the reference area. Further, there was a significant inverse relationship between both cadmium and lead contents and the pH values of the samples. The mobility of the metals was thus dependent on the acidity. The blood lead levels in 195 subjects from the acidic areas were lower than those in 91 subjects from the reference area (medians 60 vs. 70 micrograms l-1); no significant differences were found in blood cadmium or blood mercury levels. Subjects in the acidic areas had lower plasma selenium levels than those from the reference area (medians 85 vs. 90 micrograms l-1); the difference was mainly attributed to subjects with private wells. The data may indicate a negative effect of the acidic pollution on selenium intake via water and/or foods. There was also a positive relationship between intake of fish on the one hand and blood mercury and plasma selenium on the other, which is in accordance with the role of fish as a source of these metals.
PubMed ID
3438737 View in PubMed
Less detail

An examination of traditional foods and cigarette smoking as cadmium sources among the nine First Nations of Eeyou Istchee, Northern Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104372
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 May 28;16(6):1422-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-2014
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Ian D Martin
Eric N Liberda
Suzanne Coté
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Evert Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 May 28;16(6):1422-33
Date
May-28-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadmium - blood
Child
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cadmium (Cd), a nonessential toxic metal present in the environment, accumulates in the organs of herbivorous mammals which typically are consumed by Aboriginal populations. The relative contribution of this potential exposure source to concentrations of blood Cd was investigated in 1429 participants (age >7 years) residing in the nine Cree First Nations communities of Eeyou Istchee, northern Quebec, Canada. Analysis of variance identified significant Cd concentration differences between communities, sex, and age groups, although these were complicated by significant 2-way interactions. The percentage of participants with Cd concentrations within the adopted health-based guideline categories of 'acceptable', 'concern' and 'action' pertaining to kidney damage was 56.2%, 38.3%, and 5.5%, respectively. Partial correlations (controlling for age as a continuous variable) did not show a significant association between consumption of traditional foods and Cd concentrations (r = 0.014, df = 105, p = 0.883). A significant and positive partial correlation (r = 0.390, df = 105, p
PubMed ID
24781002 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anthropometric, environmental, and dietary predictors of elevated blood cadmium levels in Ukrainian children: Ukraine ELSPAC group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82098
Source
Environ Res. 2006 Sep;102(1):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Friedman Lee S
Lukyanova Elena M
Kundiev Yuri I
Shkiryak-Nizhnyk Zoreslava A
Chislovska Nataliya V
Mucha Amy
Zvinchuk Alexander V
Oliynyk Irene
Hryhorczuk Daniel
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA. lfriedman@tspri.org
Source
Environ Res. 2006 Sep;102(1):83-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - blood
Anthropometry
Cadmium - blood
Cadmium Poisoning - blood - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diet
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Industry
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
No comprehensive data on sources or risk factors of cadmium exposure in Ukrainian children are available. In this we measured the blood levels of cadmium among 80 Ukrainian children and evaluated sources of exposure. A nested case-control study from a prospective cohort of Ukrainian 3-year-old children was conducted. We evaluated predictors of elevated blood cadmium using a multivariable logistic regression model. The model included socioeconomic data, parent occupation, environmental tobacco smoke, hygiene, body-mass index, and diet. Dietary habits were evaluated using the 1992 Block-NCI-HHHQ Dietary Food Frequency survey. Elevated cadmium was defined as blood levels in the upper quartile (0.25 microg/L). The mean age for all 80 children was 36.6 months. Geometric mean cadmium level was 0.21 microg/L (range = 0.11-0.42 microg/L; SD = 0.05). Blood cadmium levels were higher among children taking zinc supplements (0.25 vs 0.21 microg/L; P = 0.032), children who ate sausage more than once per week (0.23 vs 0.20; P = 0.007) and children whose fathers worked in a by-product coking industry (0.25 vs 0.21; P = 0.056). In the multivariable model, predictors of elevated blood cadmium levels included zinc supplementation (adjusted OR = 14.16; P
PubMed ID
16729996 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury levels in blood of Finnish adults and their relation to diet, lifestyle habits and sociodemographic variables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281701
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jan;24(2):1347-1362
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Khaled Abass
Markku Koiranen
Darja Mazej
Janja Snoj Tratnik
Milena Horvat
Jukka Hakkola
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Arja Rautio
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Jan;24(2):1347-1362
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arsenic - blood
Cadmium - blood
Diet
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
Habits
Humans
Lead - blood
Life Style
Male
Mercury - blood
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Selenium - blood
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The Northern Finland Birth Cohort program (NFBC) is the epidemiological and longitudinal prospective general population research program, which was established to promote health and wellbeing of the population in northern Finland. The aim of present study, as a part of the NFBC program, was to analyze the blood levels of arsenic (B-As), cadmium (B-Cd), lead (B-Pb), total mercury (B-Hg) and selenium (B-Se); to compare these levels with threshold limits; to study sociodemographic factors; and to correlate these levels with calcium and haemoglobin. The study was comprised of 249 NFBC subjects, of which 123 were female and 126 were male (ages 31.1???0.3 and 31.1???0.4, respectively). All participants were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding diet and living habits. The geometric means (? SD) of B-As were 0.49???2.80??g/l and 0.44???2.72??g/l; B-Cd were 0.18???4.02??g/l and 0.12???3.21??g/l; B-Pb were 17.0???1.8??g/l and 9.06???2.20??g/l; B-Hg were 2.18???2.02??g/l and 1.85???1.78??g/l; and B-Se were 106.0???1.3 and 94.3???1.3??g/l in males and females, respectively. Among the subjects in the present analysis, 23?% of males and 17.1?% of females had B-As levels above the ATSDR normal human levels of B-As in unexposed individuals (1.0??g/l). The B-Pb geometric mean (12.44??g/l) was approximately one eighth the CDC toxicological cut-off point of 100??g/l. Twenty-one individuals (8.4?%) exceeded a B-Hg level of 5.8??g/l. Fifty-eight females (47?%) had a B-Hg higher than 2.0??g/l, the German Federal Environmental Agency cut-off point for women (18-69?years) who consume fish at least three times/month; therefore, their babies could be at risk of adverse effects during development.
PubMed ID
27778267 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biological monitoring of arsenic, lead and cadmium in occupationally and environmentally exposed pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64881
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993;19 Suppl 1:50-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
B J Lagerkvist
H A Söderberg
G F Nordberg
S. Ekesrydh
V. Englyst
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993;19 Suppl 1:50-3
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - analysis
Arsenic - urine
Cadmium - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Industry
Lead - blood
Occupational Exposure
Pregnancy - blood - urine
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - blood
Abstract
Lead and cadmium in blood (B-Pb and B-Cd, respectively) and arsenic in urine (U-As) were analyzed three times during pregnancy for women living around a metal smelter and women living in a reference town. The B-Pb levels were significantly higher in the smelter town. In the women of both towns, the B-Pb levels increased during pregnancy. Women who were employed at the smelter had higher B-Pb levels than women in the surrounding area. There were no significant differences in the B-Cd levels between the smelter and reference towns, except for non- and ex-smokers at the onset of pregnancy. No difference between the two areas was seen among the smokers, whose cadmium levels were twice those of non- and ex-smokers. There were no significant differences in the U-As levels, which were comparable with previously reported values in Sweden.
PubMed ID
8159973 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood and urinary cadmium levels in Inuit living in Kuujjuaq, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3571
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Dec 15;127(1-2):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1992
Author
J L Benedetti
F. Turcotte
M. Lefebvre
F. Therrien
J P Weber
Author Affiliation
Centre de Toxicologie du Québec, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Dec 15;127(1-2):167-72
Date
Dec-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cadmium - blood - urine
Child
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Inuits
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Quebec
Reindeer
Smoking
Abstract
Blood and urine cadmium concentrations have been determined in a group of 85 Inuit residents of Kuujjuaq, Quebec, Canada, drawn from actively hunting households. Mean blood cadmium values are high at 39.4 nmol/l, varying between 6.6 in non-smokers and 60.3 in smokers. No association of blood cadmium with self-reported offal consumption could be found. Median urine cadmium concentrations are elevated at 2.3 mumol/mol creatinine and rise substantially with age: 0.9 in the 30-39 age group; 3.2 among the 40-59 age group; and 4.1 in the 60 and over.
PubMed ID
1362287 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood cadmium and plasma zinc measurements in acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247218
Source
Eur J Cardiol. 1979 May;9(5):379-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1979
Author
M. Ponteva
I. Elomaa
H. Bäckman
L. Hansson
J. Kilpiö
Source
Eur J Cardiol. 1979 May;9(5):379-91
Date
May-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aspartate Aminotransferases - blood
Cadmium - blood
Calcium - blood
Creatine Kinase - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase - blood
Magnesium - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - enzymology
Zinc - blood
Abstract
Blood cadmium and plasma zinc were measured in a series of 47 patients admitted for myocardial infarction (MI) and in 37 control subjects divided into 3 groups. Certainly increased blood cadmium values, for the MI patients, were found in 33%. The mean blood cadmium value of the MI series was significantly (P less than 0.001), but not invariably, higher against the control subjects. The difference between the zinc values of the series was studied in 35 MI patients with raised serum enzyme activity. In MI patients, the mean plasma zinc content was significantly (0.001 less than P less than 0.01) lower than in healthy controls. Of the enzymes, the highest positive correlation was found between the ratio of blood cadmium to plasma zinc and the GOT activity. Of the ratio, the MI patients had values in excess of the controls range in 43%, and values within the limits of the healthy controls in 40%. Therefore, the rise in the ratio is of limited value for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction in an individual patient.
PubMed ID
456396 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood cadmium, game consumption and tobacco smoking in southern Ontario anglers and hunters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210211
Source
Can J Public Health. 1997 Jan-Feb;88(1):44-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
D C Cole
J P Kearney
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1997 Jan-Feb;88(1):44-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Cadmium - blood
Deer
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Female
Fishes
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Ontario
Questionnaires
Reindeer
Smoking - blood
PubMed ID
9094805 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood Cadmium Levels and Incident Cardiovascular Events during Follow-up in a Population-Based Cohort of Swedish Adults: The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285888
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2016 May;124(5):594-600
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Lars Barregard
Gerd Sallsten
Björn Fagerberg
Yan Borné
Margaretha Persson
Bo Hedblad
Gunnar Engström
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2016 May;124(5):594-600
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
C-Reactive Protein
Cadmium - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Diet
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Follow-Up Studies
Longitudinal Studies
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cadmium exposure may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. The only published longitudinal study on cadmium and incident cardiovascular disease was performed in American Indians with relatively high cadmium exposure.
Our aim was to examine the association between blood cadmium at baseline and incident cardiovascular events in a population-based study of Swedish men and women with cadmium levels similar to those of most European and U.S.
A Swedish population-based cohort (n = 6,103, age 46-67 years) was recruited between 1991 and 1994. After we excluded those with missing data on smoking, 4,819 participants remained. Acute coronary events, other major cardiac events, stroke, and cardiovascular mortality were followed until 2010. Associations with blood cadmium (estimated from cadmium in erythrocytes) were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression including potential confounders and important cardiovascular risk factors.
Hazard ratios for all cardiovascular end points were consistently increased for participants in the 4th blood cadmium quartile (median, 0.99 ?g/L). In models that also included sex, smoking, waist circumference, education, physical activity, alcohol intake, serum triglycerides, HbA1c, and C-reactive protein, the hazard ratios comparing the highest and lowest quartiles of exposure were 1.8 (95% CI: 1.2, 2.7) for acute coronary events, and 1.9 (1.3, 2.9) for stroke. Hazard ratios in never-smokers were consistent with these estimates.
Blood cadmium in the highest quartile was associated with incident cardiovascular disease and mortality in our population-based samples of Swedish adults. The consistent results among never-smokers are important because smoking is a strong confounder. Our findings suggest that measures to reduce cadmium exposures are warranted, even in populations without unusual sources of exposure.
Barregard L, Sallsten G, Fagerberg B, Born? Y, Persson M, Hedblad B, Engstr?m G. 2016. Blood cadmium levels and incident cardiovascular events during follow-up in a population-based cohort of Swedish adults: the Malm? Diet and Cancer Study. Environ Health Perspect 124:594-600; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1509735.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Sep 15;172(6):671-8120693268
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Feb;121(2):187-9123128055
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2013 Jul 15;167(1):146-5022244480
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2008 Apr;102(2):207-1817947343
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 Dec;63(12):1448-5119639000
Cites: BMJ Open. 2013 Mar 06;3(3):null23471610
Cites: Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2013 Oct;15(10):35623955722
Cites: J Intern Med. 1993 Jan;233(1):45-518429286
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 Oct;28(10):837-4023979603
Cites: J Intern Med. 2012 Dec;272(6):601-1022812670
Cites: PLoS One. 2015;10(3):e012124025816093
Cites: Diabet Med. 2000 Apr;17(4):299-30710821297
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Dec;116(12):1620-819079711
Cites: Circ J. 2011;75(10):2491-521799275
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e6841823874620
Cites: Stroke. 2004 Sep;35(9):2054-815232121
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2014 May;122(5):431-824569905
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2013 May 1;268(3):286-9323454399
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:45021658213
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2009 Sep;29(9):1392-819556524
Cites: Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):880-524030503
Cites: Epidemiology. 2013 May;24(3):421-923514838
Cites: Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2013 Oct;40(10):706-1223902534
Cites: Toxicol Mech Methods. 2009 May;19(4):308-1719778222
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Feb;117(2):190-619270787
Cites: Environ Res. 2015 Jan;136:67-7425460622
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Oct;30 Suppl 1:S30-411759848
Cites: Chin Med J (Engl). 2011 Nov;124(21):3504-922340168
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Jul;120(7):1017-2222472185
PubMed ID
26517380 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood erythrocyte concentrations of cadmium and lead and the risk of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105804
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e81892
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Rachel S Kelly
Thomas Lundh
Miquel Porta
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Domenico Palli
Ann-Sofie Johansson
Maria Botsivali
Paolo Vineis
Roel Vermeulen
Soterios A Kyrtopoulos
Marc Chadeau-Hyam
Author Affiliation
Medical Research Council-Health Protection Agency Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e81892
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cadmium - blood
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Female
Humans
Italy
Lead - blood
Lymphoma, B-Cell - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - blood
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are hypothesised to be risk factors for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), a group of haematological malignancies with a suspected environmental aetiology. Within the EnviroGenoMarkers study we utilised pre-diagnostic erythrocyte concentrations of Cd and Pb to determine whether exposure was associated with risk of B-cell NHL and multiple myeloma.
194 incident cases of B-cell NHL and 76 cases of multiple myeloma diagnosed between 1990 and 2006 were identified from two existing cohorts; EPIC-Italy and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Cases were matched to healthy controls by centre, age, gender and date of blood collection. Cd and Pb were measured in blood samples provided at recruitment using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Logistic regression was applied to assess the association with risk. Analyses were stratified by cohort and gender and by subtype where possible.
There was little evidence of an increased risk of B-cell NHL or multiple myeloma with exposure to Cd (B-cell NHL: OR 1.09 95%CI 0.61, 1.93, MM: OR 1.16 95% CI: 0.40, 3.40 ) or Pb (B-cell NHL: 0.93 95% CI 0.43, 2.02, multiple myeloma: OR 1.63 95%CI 0.45, 5.94) in the total population when comparing the highest to the lowest quartile of exposure. However, gender and cohort specific differences in results were observed. In females the risk of B-cell NHL was more than doubled in those with a body burden of Cd >1 ?g/L (OR 2.20 95%CI; 1.04, 4.65).
This nested case-control study does not support a consistent positive association between Cd or Pb and NHL, but there is some indication of a gender specific effect suggesting further research is warranted.
Notes
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Aug;120(8):1067-7522552995
Cites: Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2011;12(12):3471-422471499
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1997 Apr;51(2):151-99196644
Cites: Pharmacol Toxicol. 1997 Oct;81(4):153-89353844
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Jun;114(6):830-416759980
Cites: Environ Res. 2007 May;104(1):85-9516996054
Cites: Cancer Res. 2007 Jun 1;67(11):5545-5217545638
Cites: Blood. 2007 Jul 15;110(2):695-70817389762
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 2007 Dec;45(12):2488-9817673351
Cites: J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2009 Mar;12(3):206-2319466673
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2009 Aug 1;238(3):201-819409405
Cites: Toxicol In Vitro. 2009 Sep;23(6):969-7219540334
Cites: Cancer Res. 2009 Aug 15;69(16):6482-919654312
Cites: Semin Oncol. 2009 Dec;36(6):516-2319995643
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Feb;118(2):182-9020123617
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2010 Mar;213(2):99-10620153251
Cites: Mutagenesis. 2010 May;25(3):213-2120194421
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 May;19(5):1381-420406963
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jun;118(6):776-8220053595
Cites: Environ Int. 2010 Aug;36(6):623-3620466424
Cites: Carcinogenesis. 2010 Sep;31(9):1592-620530238
Cites: Gend Med. 2010 Oct;7(5):381-40121056866
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Feb;119(2):159-6720880796
Cites: Mutat Res. 2011 Mar 18;721(1):81-821241821
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2011 Apr;68(4):250-620974743
Cites: J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2011 Jan;25 Suppl 1:S78-8321242074
Cites: Toxicology. 2011 May 10;283(2-3):65-8721414382
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2012 Feb;69(2):87-9222039095
Cites: Mutat Res. 2002 Nov 26;521(1-2):165-7812438013
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2001 Jul;43(7):641-911464396
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2012 Feb;69(2):153-622068173
Cites: Mutat Res. 2003 Sep 9;540(1):19-2812972055
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:18-2414660243
Cites: Tumori. 2003 Nov-Dec;89(6):586-9314870823
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Jun 29;109(25):3196-20115184277
Cites: Oncogene. 2004 Aug 23;23(38):6524-3415322522
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1993 Feb;50(2):185-68435352
Cites: IARC Sci Publ. 1992;(118):401-41303967
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1995 Sep;134(1):26-347676455
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Jan;120(1):105-1122328999
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2012;11:422309602
Cites: Int J Environ Health Res. 2012;22(2):105-1821854105
Cites: Epidemiology. 2001 Mar;12(2):272-611246593
PubMed ID
24312375 View in PubMed
Less detail

46 records – page 1 of 5.