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Acute stroke care during the first phase of COVID-19 pandemic in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310963
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2021 Apr; 143(4):349-354
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Apr-2021
Author
Espen Saxhaug Kristoffersen
Silje Holt Jahr
Kashif Waqar Faiz
Anette Margrethe Storstein
Bendik Slagsvold Winsvold
Else Charlotte Sandset
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2021 Apr; 143(4):349-354
Date
Apr-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
COVID-19 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Communicable Disease Control - methods - trends
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics - prevention & control
Stroke - epidemiology - therapy
Stroke Rehabilitation - methods - trends
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate how the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic affected the hospital stroke management and research in Norway.
All neurological departments with a Stroke Unit in Norway (n = 17) were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey. The study focused on the first lockdown period, and all questions were thus answered in regard to the period between 12 March and 15 April 2020.
The responder rate was 94% (16/17). Eighty-one % (13/16) reported that the pandemic affected their department, and 63% (10/16) changed their stroke care pathways. The number of new acute admissions in terms of both strokes and stroke mimics decreased at all 16 departments. Fewer patients received thrombolysis and endovascular treatment, and multidisciplinary stroke rehabilitation services were less available. The mandatory 3 months of follow-up of stroke patients was postponed at 73% of the hospitals. All departments conducting stroke research reported a stop in ongoing projects.
In Norway, hospital-based stroke care and research were impacted during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, with likely repercussions for patient care and outcomes. In the future, stroke departments will require contingency plans in order to protect the entire stroke treatment chain.
PubMed ID
33421104 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of a Russian population to SARS-CoV-2: Asymptomatic course, comorbidities, mortality, and other respiratory viruses - A reply to Fear versus Data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305323
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2020 Oct; 56(4):106093
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Oct-2020
Author
Konstantin S Sharov
Author Affiliation
Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address: const.sharov@mail.ru.
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2020 Oct; 56(4):106093
Date
Oct-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asymptomatic Diseases
Betacoronavirus - pathogenicity
COVID-19
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Coronavirus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
SARS-CoV-2
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Abstract
This study was conducted to assess the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Russia and the adaptation of the population to the virus in March to June 2020. Two groups were investigated: 1) 12 082 individuals already proven positive for SARS-CoV-2 (clinical information was studied); 2) 7864+4458 individuals with suspected respiratory infections (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] tests and clinical information were studied). In the latter, SARS-CoV-2-positive individuals comprised 5.37% in March and 11.42% in June 2020. Several viral co-infections were observed for SARS-CoV-2. Rhinoviruses accounted for the largest proportion of co-infections (7.91% of samples were SARS-CoV-2-positive); followed by respiratory syncytial virus (7.03%); adenoviruses (4.84%); metapneumoviruses (3.29%); parainfluenza viruses (2.42%); enterovirus D68 (1.10%) and other viruses (entero-, echo-, parecho-) (
PubMed ID
32653618 View in PubMed
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Adaptation to SARS-CoV-2 under stress: Role of distorted information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305689
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 2020 Sep; 50(9):e13294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2020
Author
Konstantin S Sharov
Author Affiliation
Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 2020 Sep; 50(9):e13294
Date
Sep-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Health Care Surveys - methods
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Information Dissemination
Male
Mass Media - statistics & numerical data
Medical Informatics
Moscow
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia, Viral - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Stress, Physiological
Workload - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Since the time of global SARS-CoV-2 spread across the earth in February 2020, most of countries faced the problem of massive stress of their healthcare systems. In many cases, the structural stress was a result of incorrect allocation of medical care resources. In turn, this misallocation resulted from fear and apprehensions that superseded thorough calculations. A key role in exacerbating the healthcare sector overburdening was played by misleading information on the virus and disease caused by it. In the current paper, we study the situation in Russian healthcare system and advance recommendations how to avoid further crises.
(a) Surveying the medical personnel (231 doctors, 317 nurses and 355 ambulance medical workers of lower levels) in five hospitals and six ambulance centres in Moscow. (b) Content analysis of 3164 accounts in Russian segment of social networks (VKontakte, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Odnoklassniki); official and unofficial media (TV, informational webpages).
We revealed positive-feedback loop that threatened the sustainability of Russian care sector. The main knot was occupied by incorrect/exaggerated media coverage of COVID-19. General public scared by misinformation in media and social networks, started to panic. This negative social background undermined the productivity of a significant part of medical workers who were afraid of COVID-19 patients.
The most serious problems of Russian healthcare sector related to COVID-19 pandemic, were informational problems. The exaggerated information on COVID-19 had big negative influence upon Russian society and healthcare system, despite SARS-CoV-2 relatively low epidemiological hazard.
PubMed ID
32474908 View in PubMed
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[A decrease in male reproductive potential in Russia: causes, diagnosis, possibilities for correction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304857
Source
Urologiia. 2020 Sep; (4):157-164
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Sep-2020
Author
V V Borisov
Author Affiliation
FGAOU VO I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University. Moscow, Russia.
Source
Urologiia. 2020 Sep; (4):157-164
Date
Sep-2020
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Antioxidants
Betacoronavirus
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections - complications
Humans
Infertility, Male - physiopathology - virology
Male
Oxidative Stress
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - complications
Reproduction
Russia
SARS-CoV-2
Selenium
Trace Elements
Zinc
Abstract
The causes, some pathogenetic mechanisms and possibilities for correcting the decrease in male reproductive potential in Russia are discussed in the lecture. Particular attention is paid to oxidative stress as one of the main causes for subfertility and male infertility, as well as the role of trace elements (zinc, selenium) and antioxidants (vitamins A, E and C) in the pathogenesis of male infertility and opportunities for the correction of fertility issues. Some aspects of COVID-19 influence on the problems of reproductive medicine, andrology and urology are highlighted.
PubMed ID
32897031 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' health literacy, health protective measures, and health-related quality of life during the Covid-19 pandemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304892
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(8):e0238161
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2020
Author
Kirsti Riiser
Sølvi Helseth
Kristin Haraldstad
Astrid Torbjørnsen
Kåre Rønn Richardsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health, OsloMet-Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(8):e0238161
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Betacoronavirus
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hand Disinfection
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Norway
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - epidemiology
Quality of Life
SARS-CoV-2
Social Isolation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Television
Young Adult
Abstract
First, to describe adolescents' health information sources and knowledge, health literacy (HL), health protective measures, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) during the initial phase of the Covid-19 pandemic in Norway. Second, to investigate the association between HL and the knowledge and behavior relevant for preventing spread of the virus. Third, to explore variables associated with HRQoL in a pandemic environment.
This cross-sectional study includes survey data from 2,205 Norwegian adolescents 16-19 years of age. The participants reported on their health information sources, HL, handwashing knowledge and behavior, number of social interactions, and HRQoL. Associations between study variables and specified outcomes were explored using multiple linear and logistic regression analyses.
Television (TV) and family were indicated to be the main sources for pandemic-related health information. Handwashing, physical distancing, and limiting the number of social contacts were the most frequently reported measures. HL and handwashing knowledge and HL and handwashing behavior were significantly associated. For each unit increase on the HL scale, the participants were 5% more likely to socialize less with friends in comparison to normal. The mean HRQoL was very poor compared to European norms. Being quarantined or isolated and having confirmed or suspected Covid-19 were significantly negatively associated with HRQoL, but seeing less friends than normal was not associated. HL was significantly positively associated with HRQoL, albeit of minor clinical importance.
Adolescents follow the health authorities' guidelines and appear highly literate. However, high fidelity requires great sacrifice because the required measures seem to collide with certain aspects that are important for the adolescents' HRQoL.
PubMed ID
32857806 View in PubMed
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Airport Traveler Testing Program for SARS-CoV-2 - Alaska, June-November 2020.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311661
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021 Apr 23; 70(16):583-588
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-23-2021
Author
Elizabeth C Ohlsen
Kimberly A Porter
Eric Mooring
Coleman Cutchins
Anne Zink
Joseph McLaughlin
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021 Apr 23; 70(16):583-588
Date
Apr-23-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Airports
Alaska - epidemiology
COVID-19 - epidemiology - prevention & control
COVID-19 Testing
Humans
Program Evaluation
Quarantine
Travel - legislation & jurisprudence
Travel-Related Illness
Abstract
Travel can facilitate SARS-CoV-2 introduction. To reduce introduction of SARS-CoV-2 infections, the state of Alaska implemented a program on June 6, 2020, for arriving air, sea, and road travelers that required either molecular testing for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, or a 14-day self-quarantine after arrival. The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) used weekly standardized reports submitted by 10 participating Alaska airports to evaluate air traveler choices to undergo testing or self-quarantine, traveler test results, and airport personnel experiences while implementing the program. Among 386,435 air travelers who arrived in Alaska during June 6-November 14, 2020, a total of 184,438 (48%) chose to be tested within 72 hours before arrival, 111,370 (29%) chose to be tested on arrival, and 39,685 (10%) chose to self-quarantine without testing after arrival. An additional 15,112 persons received testing at airport testing sites; these were primarily travelers obtaining a second test 7-14 days after arrival, per state guidance. Of the 126,482 airport tests performed in Alaska, 951 (0.8%) results were positive, or one per 406 arriving travelers. Airport testing program administrators reported that clear communication, preparation, and organization were vital for operational success; challenges included managing travelers' expectations and ensuring that sufficient personnel and physical space were available to conduct testing. Expected mitigation measures such as vaccination, physical distancing, mask wearing, and avoidance of gatherings after arrival might also help limit postarrival transmission. Posttravel self-quarantine and testing programs might reduce travel-associated SARS-CoV-2 transmission and importation, even without enforcement. Traveler education and community and industry partnerships might help ensure success.
PubMed ID
33886533 View in PubMed
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Alaska pharmacists: First responders to the pandemic in the last frontier.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304529
Source
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2021 Jan-Feb; 61(1):e35-e38
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Amy K Paul
Talethia Bogart
Ashley R Schaber
Della C Cutchins
Renee F Robinson
Source
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2021 Jan-Feb; 61(1):e35-e38
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
COVID-19 - diagnosis - therapy
COVID-19 Testing
COVID-19 Vaccines - administration & dosage
Emergency Responders
Humans
Pharmaceutical Services - economics - organization & administration
Pharmacists - economics - organization & administration
Professional Role
Students, Pharmacy - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Pharmacists are among the nation's most accessible and underused health professionals. Within their scope of practice, pharmacists can prescribe and administer vaccines, conduct point-of-care testing, and address drug shortages through therapeutic substitutions.
To better use pharmacists as first responders to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), we conducted a needs and capacity assessment to (1) determine individual commitment to provide COVID-19 testing and management services, (2) identify resources required to provide these services, and (3) help prioritize unmet community needs that could be addressed by pharmacists.
In March 2020, pharmacists and student pharmacists within the Alaska Pharmacist Association worked to tailor, administer, and evaluate results from a 10-question survey, including demographics (respondent name, ZIP Code, cell phone, and alternate e-mail). The survey was developed on the basis of published COVID-19 guidelines, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention COVID-19 screening and management guidelines, National Association of Boards of Pharmacy guidance, and joint policy recommendation from pharmacy organizations.
Pharmacies are located in the areas of greatest COVID-19 need in Alaska. Pharmacists are willing and interested in providing support. Approximately 63% of the pharmacists who completed the survey indicated that they were interested in providing COVID-19 nasal testing, 60% were interested in conducting COVID-19 antibody testing, and 93% were interested in prescribing and administering immunizations for COVID-19, as available. When asked about resources needed to enable pharmacists to prescribe antiviral therapy, 37% of the pharmacists indicated they needed additional education or training, and 39% required access to technology to bill and document provided services.
The primary barrier to pharmacists augmenting the current COVID-19 response is an inability to cover the costs of providing these health services. Pharmacists in Alaska are ready to meet COVID-19-related clinical needs if public and private insurers and legislators can help address the barriers to service sustainability.
PubMed ID
33036935 View in PubMed
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Alcohol Consumption during a Pandemic Lockdown Period and Change in Alcohol Consumption Related to Worries and Pandemic Measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303565
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 01 29; 18(3):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-29-2021
Author
Silvia Eiken Alpers
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Silje Mæland
Ståle Pallesen
Åsgeir Kjetland Rabben
Linn-Heidi Lunde
Lars Thore Fadnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Addiction Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 01 29; 18(3):
Date
01-29-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - trends
COVID-19
Communicable disease control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics
Quarantine
Young Adult
Abstract
Whether lockdown related to the COVID-19 pandemic influences alcohol consumption is not well known. This study assesses alcohol consumption and hazardous drinking behavior during the initial phase of pandemic measures in Norway and identifies potential risk factors. A cross-sectional study (N = 25,708) was conducted in Bergen, Norway, following the first six weeks of strict infection control measures. In a model of self-assessed increased alcohol consumption, logistic regression analysis was conducted with independent variables for COVID-19-related worries, joblessness, quarantine, self-reported drinking behavior, age, gender, and occupational situation. These are reported with odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals. Fifty-one percent of respondents reported economic or health-related worries due to COVID-19, 16% had been in quarantine, 49% worked/studied from home, 54% reported hazardous drinking behavior, and 13% reported increased alcohol consumption. People aged 30-39 years had elevated odds of increased alcohol consumption during lockdown (OR 3.1, 2.4-3.8) compared to the oldest adults. Increased drinking was more frequent among people reporting economic worries (OR 1.6, 1.4-1.8), those quarantined (OR 1.2, 1.1-1.4), and those studying or working at home (OR 1.4, 1.3-1.6). More than half of respondents reported hazardous drinking behavior. Increased alcohol consumption during lockdown was common among people with economic worries, people in quarantine, and people studying or working at home. These data could be important when adjusting pandemic measures.
PubMed ID
33572994 View in PubMed
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[Almost two-thirds of the elderly with covid-19 surviving in nursing homes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305471
Source
Lakartidningen. 2020 06 26; 117:
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-26-2020
Author
Stefan Amér
Christian Molnar
Marina Tuutma
Carina Metzner
Petra Tegman
Maria Taranger
Miia Kivipelto
Peter Strang
Author Affiliation
Ordförande i SÄBO-rådet Stockholm, Familjeläkarna Äldrevård.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2020 06 26; 117:
Date
06-26-2020
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Betacoronavirus
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections - mortality
Frail Elderly
Humans
Nursing Homes
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - mortality
SARS-CoV-2
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A large proportion of deaths worldwide have occurred among elderly living in nursing homes. Sweden is no exception with a comparable proportion making up around half of all deaths. The elderly, frail individuals living in nursing homes are among the most vulnerable and with the highest risk to die of covid-19. In spite of that we see almost two-thirds of the infected are still alive with a majority recovering fully after receiving treatment at the nursing home. Of 8?057 residents living in nursing homes in Stockholm, 1?464 (18?%) individuals have so far been diagnosed  with covid-19 and 532 have died (6?% of all residents). Importantly, this means that a great majority of the residents are still alive including almost two-thirds (932/1?464) of the infected individuals.
PubMed ID
32594470 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native People: Social Vulnerability and COVID-19.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305158
Source
J Rural Health. 2021 01; 37(1):256-259
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2021

260 records – page 1 of 26.