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1,3-Butadiene: exposure estimation, hazard characterization, and exposure-response analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186649
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Hughes
M E Meek
M. Walker
R. Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
Existing Substances Division, Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Environmental Health Centre, Tunney's Pasture PL0802B1, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Butadienes - metabolism - toxicity
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens, Environmental - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Mutagens - toxicity
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
1,3-Butadiene has been assessed as a Priority Substance under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The general population in Canada is exposed to 1,3-butadiene primarily through ambient air. Inhaled 1,3-butadiene is carcinogenic in both mice and rats, inducing tumors at multiple sites at all concentrations tested in all identified studies. In addition, 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in both somatic and germ cells of rodents. It also induces adverse effects in the reproductive organs of female mice at relatively low concentrations. The greater sensitivity in mice than in rats to induction of these effects by 1,3-butadiene is likely related to species differences in metabolism to active epoxide metabolites. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene in the occupational environment has been associated with the induction of leukemia; there is also some limited evidence that 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in exposed workers. Therefore, in view of the weight of evidence of available epidemiological and toxicological data, 1,3-butadiene is considered highly likely to be carcinogenic, and likely to be genotoxic, in humans. Estimates of the potency of butadiene to induce cancer have been derived on the basis of both epidemiological investigation and bioassays in mice and rats. Potencies to induce ovarian effects have been estimated on the basis of studies in mice. Uncertainties have been delineated, and, while there are clear species differences in metabolism, estimates of potency to induce effects are considered justifiably conservative in view of the likely variability in metabolism across the population related to genetic polymorphism for enzymes for the critical metabolic pathway.
PubMed ID
12587254 View in PubMed
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Health risk assessment of 1,3-butadiene as a Priority Substance in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194411
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2001 Jun 1;135-136:109-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2001
Author
K. Hughes
M E Meek
M. Walker
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture PL0802B1, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2. kathy_hughes@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2001 Jun 1;135-136:109-35
Date
Jun-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Butadienes - metabolism - toxicity
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens, Environmental - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Mutagens - toxicity
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
1,3-Butadiene was included in the second list of Priority Substances to be assessed under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. Potential hazards to human health were characterized on the basis of critical examination of available data on health effects in experimental animals and occupationally exposed human populations, as well as information on mode of action. Based on consideration of all relevant data identified as of April 1998, butadiene was considered highly likely to be carcinogenic to humans, and likely to be a somatic and germ cell genotoxicant in humans. In addition, butadiene may also be a reproductive toxicant in humans. Estimates of the potency of butadiene to induce these effects have been derived on the basis of quantitation of observed exposure-response relationships for the purposes of characterization of risk to the general population in Canada exposed to butadiene in the ambient environment.
PubMed ID
11397385 View in PubMed
Less detail