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1,3-Butadiene and leukemia among synthetic rubber industry workers: exposure-response relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166384
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2007
Author
Hong Cheng
Nalini Sathiakumar
John Graff
Robert Matthews
Elizabeth Delzell
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Ryals School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Birmingham, AL, USA. hcheng@ms.soph.uab.edu
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Date
Mar-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens - chemical synthesis - chemistry - toxicity
Chemical Industry - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Dimethyldithiocarbamate - adverse effects
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphoid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Likelihood Functions
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Rubber - adverse effects - chemical synthesis - chemistry
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous research updated the mortality experience of North American synthetic rubber industry workers during the period 1944-1998, determined if leukemia and other cancers were associated with several employment factors and carried out Poisson regression analysis to examine exposure-response associations between estimated exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) or other chemicals and cancer. The present study used Cox regression procedures to examine further the exposure-response relationship between several unlagged and lagged, continuous, time-dependent BD exposure indices (BD parts per million (ppm)-years, the total number of exposures to BD concentrations >100 ppm ("peaks") and average intensity of BD) and leukemia, lymphoid neoplasms and myeloid neoplasms. All three BD exposure indices were associated positively with leukemia. Using continuous, untransformed BD ppm-years the regression coefficient (beta) from an analysis that controlled only for age was 2.9 x 10(-4) (p
PubMed ID
17123495 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the health hazards of 1,3-butadiene and styrene. Meeting report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219913
Source
J Occup Med. 1993 Nov;35(11):1089-95
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Nov-1993

Carcinogenicity of exposures to 1,3-butadiene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222980
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1992 Oct;18(5):330-2
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Oct-1992

[Methodological approach to the study of health status of the population in relation to water pollution with chemical substances with embryotropic effect (e.g. isoprene in the production of synthetic rubber)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228132
Source
Gig Sanit. 1990 Nov;(11):83-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990

Mortality from cancer and other causes of death among synthetic rubber workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205420
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1998 Apr;55(4):230-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
N. Sathiakumar
E. Delzell
M. Hovinga
M. Macaluso
J A Julian
R. Larson
P. Cole
D C Muir
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1998 Apr;55(4):230-5
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - adverse effects
Chemical Industry - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kentucky - epidemiology
Louisiana - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Rubber
Styrenes - adverse effects
Texas - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This study evaluated the mortality experience of workers from the styrene-butadiene rubber industry. Concerns about a possible association of 1,3-butadiene and styrene with lymphohaematopoietic, gastrointestinal, and lung cancers prompted the investigation.
A retrospective follow up study was conducted of 15,649 men employed for at least one year at any of eight North American styrene-butadiene rubber plants. Analyses used standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) to compare styrene-butadiene rubber workers' cause specific mortalities (1943-91) with those of the United States and Ontario general populations.
On average, there were 25 years of follow up per subject. The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 87 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 85 to 90) for all causes of death combined and was 93 (95% CI 87 to 99) for all cancers. There was an excess of leukaemia (SMR 131, 95% CI 97 to 174), restricted to hourly workers (SMR 143, 95% CI 104 to 191). For causes of death other than leukaemia, SMRs were close to or below the null value of 100. Results by work area (process group) were unremarkable for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and stomach cancer. Maintenance workers had a slight increase in deaths from lung cancer, and certain subgroups of workers had more than expected deaths from cancer of the large intestine and the larynx.
This study found an excess of leukaemia that is likely to be due to exposure to butadiene or to butadiene plus other chemicals. Deaths from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and stomach cancer did not seem to be related to occupational exposure. The excess deaths from lung cancer among maintenance workers may be due in part to confounding by smoking, which was not controlled for, and in part to an unidentified occupational exposure other than butadiene or styrene. Increases in cancer of the large intestine and larynx were based on small numbers, did not seem to be due to exposure to butadiene or styrene, and may be chance observations.
Notes
Cites: Comput Biomed Res. 1974 Aug;7(4):325-324850570
Cites: Toxicology. 1996 Oct 28;113(1-3):190-2028901898
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1982 Dec;8(4):250-97170621
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1985;8(3):193-2054050802
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1985 Oct;11(5):347-524070999
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Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1990 Nov;47(11):753-622245187
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1992 Jun;18(3):145-541615288
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Oct 1;136(7):843-541442750
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Cites: Toxicology. 1996 Oct 28;113(1-3):182-98901897
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1978;4 Suppl 2:231-9734410
PubMed ID
9624276 View in PubMed
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Mortality of a cohort of workers in the styrene-butadiene polymer manufacturing industry (1943-1982).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228904
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1990 Jun;86:107-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
G M Matanoski
C. Santos-Burgoa
L. Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1990 Jun;86:107-17
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Chemical Industry
Cohort Studies
Elastomers
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leukemia - mortality
Lymphoma - mortality
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Styrenes - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
A cohort of 12,110 male workers employed 1 or more years in eight styrene-butadiene polymer (SBR) manufacturing plants in the United States and Canada has been followed for mortality over a 40-year period, 1943 to 1982. The all-cause mortality of these workers was low [standardized mortality ratio (SMR) = 0.81] compared to that of the general population. However, some specific sites of cancers had SMRs that exceeded 1.00. These sites were then examined by major work divisions. The sites of interest included leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in whites. The SMRs for cancers of the digestive tract were higher than expected, especially esophageal cancer in whites and stomach cancer in blacks. The SMR for arteriosclerotic heart disease in black workers was significantly higher than would be expected based on general population rates. Employees were assigned to a work area based on job longest held. The SMRs for specific diseases differed by work area. Production workers showed increased SMRs for hematologic neoplasms and maintenance workers, for digestive cancers. A significant excess SMR for arteriosclerotic heart disease occurred only in black maintenance workers, although excess mortality from this disease occurred in blacks regardless of where they worked the longest. A significant excess SMR for rheumatic heart disease was associated with work in the combined, all-other work areas. For many causes of death, there were significant deficits in the SMRs.
Notes
Cites: Comput Biomed Res. 1974 Aug;7(4):325-324850570
Cites: J Occup Med. 1976 Mar;18(3):178-851255279
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1982 Dec;8(4):250-97170621
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1984;5(3):239-496702828
Cites: J Occup Med. 1987 Aug;29(8):675-803655951
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1987;12(3):311-293674024
PubMed ID
2401250 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1997 May;8(3):473-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
A. Blair
N. Kazerouni
Author Affiliation
Occupational Studies Section at the National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD 20892-7364, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1997 May;8(3):473-90
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylonitrile - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Animals
Bis(Chloromethyl) Ether - adverse effects
Butadienes - adverse effects
Carcinogens - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
England - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure
Ethylene Oxide - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Formaldehyde - adverse effects
Hemangiosarcoma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Laryngeal Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Leukemia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Methyl Ethers - adverse effects
Mustard Gas - adverse effects
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Neoplasms, Experimental - chemically induced
Nose Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Organic Chemicals - adverse effects
Risk factors
Sulfuric Acids - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Vinyl Chloride - adverse effects
Abstract
Epidemiologic evidence on the relation between reactive chemicals and cancer is reviewed. These highly reactive chemicals (acrylonitrile; bis[chloromethyl]ether and chloromethyl methyl ether; 1,3-butadiene, ethylene oxide; formaldehyde; mustard gas; sulfuric acid; and vinyl chloride) vary in use and exposure. All are animal carcinogens that also have received considerable epidemiologic attention. Acrylonitrile is a chemical of current economic importance. The epidemiologic evidence is quite weak, but the available studies were very small. Epidemiologic studies clearly demonstrate that bis (chloromethyl) ether and chloromethyl methyl ether cause lung cancer. Continued follow-up of exposed workers is encouraged to provide information on risks for other cancers. Results from epidemiologic studies of butadiene-exposed workers are somewhat inconsistent, but the largest study with the best exposure assessment found the largest relative risk for leukemia. The failure of several larger studies to replicate the early Swedish findings of a very strong association between leukemia and ethylene oxide has not been adequately explained. Epidemiologic studies of formaldehyde provide limited evidence for an association with cancer of the nasopharynx and possibly with nasal cancer. These very rare tumors, however, are difficult to study epidemiologically. Mustard gas is a well-established lung carcinogen, but a recent follow-up of the English cohort suggests that other sites also may be affected. Sulfuric acid appears to cause laryngeal cancer. A suggested relationship with lung cancer in a few studies is of concern because of the widespread opportunity for exposure from ambient air pollution. Vinyl chloride causes angiosarcoma of the liver, but a large, multi-country study provided no clear evidence that other sites are affected.
PubMed ID
9498905 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.