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35 records – page 1 of 4.

[An analysis of fatal outcomes in deep burns in children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217221
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1994 Oct-Dec;37(4):10-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
I A Nushtaev
A V Nushtaev
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1994 Oct-Dec;37(4):10-2
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burns - mortality - pathology
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The authors analyze death cases from deep burns at the Pediatric Burn Center of the town of Saratov in 1978-1992. A relationship between mortality rate, on the one hand, and the size and site of the injury and patients' age, on the other, was revealed. "Critical days" of burn disease were distinguished, which are characterized by increased number of lethal cases. Stages of burn disease were defined, as were the main causes of death. Histologic changes in organs and tissues of the victims are described.
PubMed ID
7892682 View in PubMed
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Assessing the number of fire fatalities in a defined population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274401
Source
J Safety Res. 2015 Dec;55:99-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Anders Jonsson
Anders Bergqvist
Ragnar Andersson
Source
J Safety Res. 2015 Dec;55:99-103
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burns - mortality
Databases, Factual
Female
Fires - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Public Health Surveillance
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Fire-related fatalities and injuries have become a growing governmental concern in Sweden, and a national vision zero strategy has been adopted stating that nobody should get killed or seriously injured from fires. There is considerable uncertainty, however, regarding the numbers of both deaths and injuries due to fires. Different national sources present different numbers, even on deaths, which obstructs reliable surveillance of the problem over time. We assume the situation is similar in other countries. This study seeks to assess the true number of fire-related deaths in Sweden by combining sources, and to verify the coverage of each individual source. By doing so, we also wish to demonstrate the possibilities of improved surveillance practices.
Data from three national sources were collected and matched; a special database on fatal fires held by The Swedish Contingencies Agency (nationally responsible for fire prevention), a database on forensic medical examinations held by the National Board of Forensic Medicine, and the cause of death register held by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare.
The results disclose considerable underreporting in the single sources. The national database on fatal fires, serving as the principal source for policy making on fire prevention matters, underestimates the true situation by 20%. Its coverage of residential fires appears to be better than other fires.
Systematic safety work and informed policy-making presuppose access to correct and reliable numbers. By combining several different sources, as suggested in this study, the national database on fatal fires is now considerably improved and includes regular matching with complementary sources.
PubMed ID
26683552 View in PubMed
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[Centralized treatment of extensive burns in Norway].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229818
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Nov 10;109(31):3192-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1989
Author
F E Abyholm
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Nov 10;109(31):3192-4
Date
Nov-10-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burns - mortality - rehabilitation - therapy
Hospitals, Municipal - organization & administration
Hospitals, Special - organization & administration
Humans
Norway
Prognosis
Abstract
About 800 patients are admitted annually to Norwegian hospitals for burn injuries. Among these, about 5% (40) patients have extensive burns, and 80-110 have special burns (skinburns combined with inhalation injuries, burns of the hands and burns of the face). The National Burn Center at Haukeland Hospital was opened in October 1984. In our experience decreased mortality, reduced disability and quicker rehabilitation are achieved when extensive and special burns are treated in specialized burn units.
PubMed ID
2595678 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
World J Surg. 1978 Mar;2(2):167-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1978

[Deaths in fires. Children and the aged are high-risk groups].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246124
Source
Nord Med. 1980 Feb;95(2):44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1980

Effect of blood transfusion on outcome after major burn injury: a multicenter study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169855
Source
Crit Care Med. 2006 Jun;34(6):1602-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Tina L Palmieri
Daniel M Caruso
Kevin N Foster
Bruce A Cairns
Michael D Peck
Richard L Gamelli
David W Mozingo
Richard J Kagan
Wendy Wahl
Nathan A Kemalyan
Joel S Fish
Manuel Gomez
Robert L Sheridan
Lee D Faucher
Barbara A Latenser
Nicole S Gibran
Robert L Klein
Lynn D Solem
Jeffrey R Saffle
Stephen E Morris
James C Jeng
David Voigt
Pamela A Howard
Fred Molitor
David G Greenhalgh
Author Affiliation
Shriners Hospital for Children Northern California and University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA.
Source
Crit Care Med. 2006 Jun;34(6):1602-7
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Blood Transfusion
Burns - mortality - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Trauma Severity Indices
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To delineate blood transfusion practices and outcomes in patients with major burn injury.
Patients with major burn injury frequently require multiple blood transfusions; however, the effect of blood transfusion after major burn injury has had limited study.
Multicenter retrospective cohort analysis.
Regional burn centers throughout the United States and Canada.
Patients admitted to a participating burn center from January 1 through December 31, 2002, with acute burn injuries of >or=20% total body surface area.
Outcome measurements included mortality, number of infections, length of stay, units of blood transfused in and out of the operating room, number of operations, and anticoagulant use.
A total of 21 burn centers contributed data on 666 patients; 79% of patients survived and received a mean of 14 units of packed red blood cells during their hospitalization. Mortality was related to patient age, total body surface area burn, inhalation injury, number of units of blood transfused outside the operating room, and total number of transfusions. The number of infections per patient increased with each unit of blood transfused (odds ratio, 1.13; p
Notes
Comment In: Crit Care Med. 2006 Jun;34(6):1822-316714983
PubMed ID
16607231 View in PubMed
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