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28 records – page 1 of 3.

Abandonment of newborn infants: a Danish forensic medical survey 1997-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133431
Source
Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2011 Dec;7(4):317-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Alexandra Gheorghe
Jytte Banner
Steen Holger Hansen
Uffe Stolborg
Niels Lynnerup
Author Affiliation
Stor Kongesgade 84, 2tv, 1264 Copenhagen, Denmark. svejme@hotmail.com
Source
Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2011 Dec;7(4):317-21
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asphyxia - mortality - pathology
Brain Injuries - mortality - pathology
Burial - statistics & numerical data
Child, Abandoned - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Female
Forensic Pathology
Head Injuries, Closed - mortality - pathology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infanticide - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Single Person - statistics & numerical data
Skull Fractures - mortality - pathology
Time Factors
Umbilical Cord - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Concealment of pregnancy and newborn infant abandonment are closely associated with neonaticide, the killing of an infant within the first 24 h of life or less than 28-30 days depending on the jurisdiction. Abandonment of newborn infants occurs throughout the world and often the outcome for the infant is death. Together with neonaticide it is felt to be one of the least preventable crimes. In this retrospective study we present all forensically known Danish cases of abandoned newborn infant corpses, covering the period from 1997 to 2008. Eleven newborn infant corpses were found; we registered characteristics of the newborn infants and the circumstances of the cases based on autopsy reports. One further newborn infant was included, dating back to 1992, as it was found to be connected with one of the later cases. The mean age of the women who abandoned their newborn infants was 22 years, and five of the autopsied newborn infants were probably alive when abandoned. In two cases the newborn infants were half siblings and abandoned by the same mother. The time span from abandonment to when the newborn infant was found ranged from hours to 7 years. Two-thirds of the newborn infants were girls (66.6%). The most common means of disposal was in a plastic bag (~60%); only one newborn infant was wearing clothes when found. Causes of death were usually given as asphyxia, brain injury or simply undetermined. Two-thirds of the newborn infants showed signs of violence. None of the newborn infants had congenital malformations.
PubMed ID
21706371 View in PubMed
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[About the possibility to detect the fact of corpse transportation from the sea coastline with the subsequent burial].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263372
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2015 Jan-Feb;58(1):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
D Yu Ponomarev
A V Nikitaev
A M Kurch
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2015 Jan-Feb;58(1):13-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone and Bones - pathology
Burial
Cadaver
Drowning - pathology
Forensic Anthropology - methods
Humans
Oceans and Seas
Postmortem Changes
Russia
Seawater
Abstract
The objective of the present work was to detect and describe the new features characterizing the long-term stay of a corpse in seawater followed by its burial on earth. The bones of the skeletonized corpse were found to be covered with mussels and petrified sea worms that can serve as the indicators of staying the corps in seawater and its subsequent transportation from the sea coastline to the inland. These findings can be used to clarify the circumstances of death of the people found in the illegal burial places at the seacoast of maritime areas.
PubMed ID
25874312 View in PubMed
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Aspects of teeth from archaelogic sites in Sweden and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33952
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):14-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
V. Alexandersen
J G Norén
I. Hoyer
W. Dietz
G. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, Panum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):14-9
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids - adverse effects
Burial
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Dental Enamel - anatomy & histology - embryology - ultrastructure
Dentin - anatomy & histology - ultrastructure
Environment
Food Habits
Gestational Age
History, Ancient
Humans
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Microscopy, Polarization
Molar - anatomy & histology - ultrastructure
Paleodontology
Porosity
Postmortem Changes
Sweden
Tooth Abrasion - pathology
Tooth, Deciduous - anatomy & histology - embryology - ultrastructure
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine ground sections of primary second molars and permanent first molars from the same jaws. Teeth from 11 individuals were collected from archaeologic sites in Sweden and Denmark. Longitudinal buccolingual sections were examined in a polarization light microscope and in a Philips scanning electron microscope (SEM). The seven teeth from Sweden appeared to have been subjected to environmental influences at their burial site, which had affected both the dentin and the enamel. The teeth from the Danish sites had a normal color, and no disintegration of the dentin was seen. The general morphologic appearance was normal in all primary and permanent teeth. The position of the neonatal line indicated a normal full-term gestational age. The observed accentuated incremental lines in both the primary and permanent enamel suggested periods of dietary changes, possibly related to periods of illness. SEM images of the surface area of the Swedish teeth showed an extremely porous enamel surface with severe changes in the prism structure as an effect of acid penetration. The Danish teeth did not show any marked changes in the enamel.
PubMed ID
9537729 View in PubMed
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Between East and West: A diachronic overview of Finnish death culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282594
Source
Death Stud. 2017 Jan;41(1):51-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Maija Butters
Source
Death Stud. 2017 Jan;41(1):51-60
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Burial - history
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Finland
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Protestantism - history
Religion - history
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
Finland holds a unique place in the geographical and cultural map of Europe by being situated between the East and the West. This article will offer a historical overview of Finland's death culture from the point of view of the various religious and ideological practices that reflect influence from these two sides. I also explore the factors that may explain the Lutheran Church's hegemony over death and dying in Finland.
PubMed ID
27845612 View in PubMed
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Burying dogs in ancient Cis-Baikal, Siberia: temporal trends and relationships with human diet and subsistence practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113711
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(5):e63740
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Robert J Losey
Sandra Garvie-Lok
Jennifer A Leonard
M Anne Katzenberg
Mietje Germonpré
Tatiana Nomokonova
Mikhail V Sablin
Olga I Goriunova
Natalia E Berdnikova
Nikolai A Savel'ev
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. robert.losey@ualberta.ca
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(5):e63740
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Archaeology
Bone and Bones - anatomy & histology - chemistry
Burial - history
Culture
Diet
Dogs
Geography
Haplotypes
History, Ancient
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Radiometric Dating
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Siberia
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Abstract
The first objective of this study is to examine temporal patterns in ancient dog burials in the Lake Baikal region of Eastern Siberia. The second objective is to determine if the practice of dog burial here can be correlated with patterns in human subsistence practices, in particular a reliance on terrestrial mammals. Direct radiocarbon dating of a suite of the region's dog remains indicates that these animals were given burial only during periods in which human burials were common. Dog burials of any kind were most common during the Early Neolithic (~7-8000 B.P.), and rare during all other time periods. Further, only foraging groups seem to have buried canids in this region, as pastoralist habitation sites and cemeteries generally lack dog interments, with the exception of sacrificed animals. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data indicate that dogs were only buried where and when human diets were relatively rich in aquatic foods, which here most likely included river and lake fish and Baikal seal (Phoca sibirica). Generally, human and dog diets appear to have been similar across the study subregions, and this is important for interpreting their radiocarbon dates, and comparing them to those obtained on the region's human remains, both of which likely carry a freshwater old carbon bias. Slight offsets were observed in the isotope values of dogs and humans in our samples, particularly where both have diets rich in aquatic fauna. This may result from dietary differences between people and their dogs, perhaps due to consuming fish of different sizes, or even different tissues from the same aquatic fauna. This paper also provides a first glimpse of the DNA of ancient canids in Northeast Asia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23696851 View in PubMed
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Causes of mortality in a subarctic settlement (York Factory, Man.), 1714-1946.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241571
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Sep 15;129(6):571-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1983
Author
W B Ewart
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Sep 15;129(6):571-4
Date
Sep-15-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burial - history
Communicable Diseases - history
Disease Outbreaks - history - mortality
Europe - ethnology
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - history
Male
Manitoba
Mortality
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
A 250-year retrospective mortality study of York Factory, on the shores of Hudson Bay, was undertaken. The daily journals of the Hudson's Bay Company and the records of the Anglican Church of Canada were the principal sources examined. From 1714 to 1801 the death rate among the Europeans was 0.015 per year, about 10 times today's level but in line with American figures of the period. The high mobility of the population during the 19th century precluded statistical assessment. In the first half of the 20th century the Europeans left; among the Cree Indians who stayed 316 out of 401 deaths were caused by infection. As in the preceding eras, tuberculosis and influenza, sometimes in epidemic form, were the most commonly diagnosed diseases. The settlement's overall mortality rate in those last 45 years was 0.03 per year, triple that for the rest of Canada in 1932.
Notes
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1964 Dec;10:917-914272490
Cites: Jpn J Med Sci Biol. 1975 Aug;28(4):201-13175201
PubMed ID
6349770 View in PubMed
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Christianization, female infanticide, and the abundance of female burials at Viking Age Birka in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124273
Source
J Hist Sex. 2012;21(2):245-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012

Excavation of the 1814 Battle of Snake Hill site: a medical history perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226538
Source
Caduceus. 1991;7(1):1-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A. Noë
Author Affiliation
National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC, USA.
Source
Caduceus. 1991;7(1):1-17
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burial
Fractures, Bone
History, 19th Century
Humans
Male
Military Medicine
Military Personnel
Multiple Trauma
Ontario
Postmortem Changes
War
PubMed ID
9419806 View in PubMed
Less detail

A female Viking warrior confirmed by genomics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287199
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2017 Dec;164(4):853-860
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson
Anna Kjellström
Torun Zachrisson
Maja Krzewinska
Veronica Sobrado
Neil Price
Torsten Günther
Mattias Jakobsson
Anders Götherström
Jan Storå
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2017 Dec;164(4):853-860
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropology, Physical
Burial - history
DNA - analysis - genetics
Female
Genomics
History, Medieval
Humans
Military Personnel - history
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The objective of this study has been to confirm the sex and the affinity of an individual buried in a well-furnished warrior grave (Bj 581) in the Viking Age town of Birka, Sweden. Previously, based on the material and historical records, the male sex has been associated with the gender of the warrior and such was the case with Bj 581. An earlier osteological classification of the individual as female was considered controversial in a historical and archaeological context. A genomic confirmation of the biological sex of the individual was considered necessary to solve the issue.
Genome-wide sequence data was generated in order to confirm the biological sex, to support skeletal integrity, and to investigate the genetic relationship of the individual to ancient individuals as well as modern-day groups. Additionally, a strontium isotope analysis was conducted to highlight the mobility of the individual.
The genomic results revealed the lack of a Y-chromosome and thus a female biological sex, and the mtDNA analyses support a single-individual origin of sampled elements. The genetic affinity is close to present-day North Europeans, and within Sweden to the southern and south-central region. Nevertheless, the Sr values are not conclusive as to whether she was of local or nonlocal origin.
The identification of a female Viking warrior provides a unique insight into the Viking society, social constructions, and exceptions to the norm in the Viking time-period. The results call for caution against generalizations regarding social orders in past societies.
PubMed ID
28884802 View in PubMed
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The genome of a Late Pleistocene human from a Clovis burial site in western Montana.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104987
Source
Nature. 2014 Feb 13;506(7487):225-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-13-2014
Author
Morten Rasmussen
Sarah L Anzick
Michael R Waters
Pontus Skoglund
Michael DeGiorgio
Thomas W Stafford
Simon Rasmussen
Ida Moltke
Anders Albrechtsen
Shane M Doyle
G David Poznik
Valborg Gudmundsdottir
Rachita Yadav
Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas
Samuel Stockton White
Morten E Allentoft
Omar E Cornejo
Kristiina Tambets
Anders Eriksson
Peter D Heintzman
Monika Karmin
Thorfinn Sand Korneliussen
David J Meltzer
Tracey L Pierre
Jesper Stenderup
Lauri Saag
Vera M Warmuth
Margarida C Lopes
Ripan S Malhi
Søren Brunak
Thomas Sicheritz-Ponten
Ian Barnes
Matthew Collins
Ludovic Orlando
Francois Balloux
Andrea Manica
Ramneek Gupta
Mait Metspalu
Carlos D Bustamante
Mattias Jakobsson
Rasmus Nielsen
Eske Willerslev
Author Affiliation
1] Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark [2].
Source
Nature. 2014 Feb 13;506(7487):225-9
Date
Feb-13-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Archaeology
Asia - ethnology
Bone and Bones
Burial
Chromosomes, Human, Y - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Emigration and Immigration - history
Europe - ethnology
Gene Flow - genetics
Genome, Human - genetics
Haplotypes - genetics
History, Ancient
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Infant
Male
Models, Genetic
Molecular Sequence Data
Montana
Phylogeny
Population Dynamics
Radiometric Dating
Abstract
Clovis, with its distinctive biface, blade and osseous technologies, is the oldest widespread archaeological complex defined in North America, dating from 11,100 to 10,700 (14)C years before present (bp) (13,000 to 12,600 calendar years?bp). Nearly 50?years of archaeological research point to the Clovis complex as having developed south of the North American ice sheets from an ancestral technology. However, both the origins and the genetic legacy of the people who manufactured Clovis tools remain under debate. It is generally believed that these people ultimately derived from Asia and were directly related to contemporary Native Americans. An alternative, Solutrean, hypothesis posits that the Clovis predecessors emigrated from southwestern Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum. Here we report the genome sequence of a male infant (Anzick-1) recovered from the Anzick burial site in western Montana. The human bones date to 10,705?±?35 (14)C years?bp (approximately 12,707-12,556 calendar years?bp) and were directly associated with Clovis tools. We sequenced the genome to an average depth of 14.4×?and show that the gene flow from the Siberian Upper Palaeolithic Mal'ta population into Native American ancestors is also shared by the Anzick-1 individual and thus happened before 12,600 years?bp. We also show that the Anzick-1 individual is more closely related to all indigenous American populations than to any other group. Our data are compatible with the hypothesis that Anzick-1 belonged to a population directly ancestral to many contemporary Native Americans. Finally, we find evidence of a deep divergence in Native American populations that predates the Anzick-1 individual.
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2014 Feb 13;506(7487):162-324522593
PubMed ID
24522598 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.