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64 records – page 1 of 7.

An ongoing measles outbreak in Bulgaria, 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149926
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009 Jul 2;14(26)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2-2009
Author
L. Marinova
M. Kojouharova
Z. Mihneva
Author Affiliation
National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia, Bulgaria. lmarinova@ncipd.org
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009 Jul 2;14(26)
Date
Jul-2-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bulgaria - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Measles - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
After seven years without indigenous transmission of measles in Bulgaria, an increasing number of cases have been reported since 15 April 2009. By 19 June, the total number of notifications reached 84. To date, 64 were confirmed as measles cases and 15 cases, for whom laboratory results are pending, have been classified as probable. The present measles outbreak affects mostly the Roma population living in the north-eastern part of the country. The most affected age groups are young children below 1 year of age and children 1 to 9 years of age. An immunisation campaign was started in the affected administrative regions, targeting all persons from 13 months to 30 years of age who had not received the complete two-dose MMR vaccination.
Notes
Erratum In: Euro Surveill.2009;14(27). pii: 19262
PubMed ID
19573512 View in PubMed
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An update on an ongoing measles outbreak in Bulgaria, April-November 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146096
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009;14(50)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
L. Marinova
M. Muscat
Z. Mihneva
M. Kojouharova
Author Affiliation
National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia, Bulgaria. Lmarinova@ncipd.org
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009;14(50)
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bulgaria - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Vaccination - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
Earlier this year, an outbreak of measles was detected in Bulgaria, following an eight-year period without indigenous measles transmission, and continues to spread in the country. By the end of 48 week of 2009 (first week of November), 957 measles cases had been recorded. Most cases are identified among the Roma community living in the north-eastern part of the country. Measles has affected infants, children and young adults. The vaccination campaign that started earlier in the year in the affected administrative regions continues, targeting all individuals from 13 months to 30 years of age who have not received the complete two-dose regimen of the combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination.
Notes
Comment In: Euro Surveill. 2009;14(50). pii: 1944920070940
PubMed ID
20070938 View in PubMed
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[Artificial abortions in Bulgaria and their prevention]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64886
Source
Akush Ginekol (Sofiia). 1993;32(2):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
S. Ivanov
D. Vasilev
T. Chernev
Source
Akush Ginekol (Sofiia). 1993;32(2):47-8
Date
1993
Language
Bulgarian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Abortion, Legal - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Bulgaria - epidemiology
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Maternal mortality
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Abstract
Authors go into one extremely important problem for the family, woman, natality and family planning in Bulgaria. Scarcely during the last years it can be observed a slight reduction of the frequency of induced abortions. The average age of women having an abortion is high--about 30, which shows, that induced abortion is still a method of regulation fertility in intergenetic interval. The rate of those who have induced abortion under the age of 19 in Bulgaria is 7.8 to 53.3%, in Czechoslovakia, 6.7%, in DDR--50.0%, Greece--68%, Hungary--8.9%, Sweden--15.8%. The rate of done again induced abortion is higher, that is a result of bad preventing activities during the first abortion. Similar is the tendency of growing number of unmarried women having an induced abortion, as it is in the other countries: from 16.4% in 1980 to 21.7% in 1987. Bulgaria is on the third place in Europe according to the absolute number of dead cases after abortion (maternity death, after Rumania and USSR). It can be mentioned that in Bulgaria women do not use the most modern and safest devices, medicines for interruption of pregnancy.
PubMed ID
8010407 View in PubMed
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Association of pesticide exposure, vaccination response, and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153968
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):709-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
M. Baranska
L. Van Amelsvoort
S. Birindelli
S. Fustinoni
E. Corsini
J. Liesivuori
H. Van Loveren
Author Affiliation
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):709-13
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Bulgaria
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Hepatitis B Vaccines - immunology
Humans
Immune System - drug effects - immunology - physiopathology
Immunity - drug effects - immunology
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein - genetics
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Interleukin-1alpha - genetics
Interleukin-1beta - genetics
Italy
Netherlands
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Pesticides - poisoning
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk assessment
Vaccination
Abstract
We performed a cross-sectional study involving workers from four European countries in which exposure to pesticides and immune parameters were evaluated over a short period of time. The total study population consisted of 238 workers occupationally exposed to pesticides and 198 nonoccupationally exposed workers. The study showed that pesticide exposure at levels encountered by workers under different conditions in Europe did not affect the ability of the immune system to respond to vaccination. We could, however, identify individuals within the group of pesticide exposed workers who were genetically characterized by the 2.2 IL-1alpha polymorphism and who showed a lower antibody response, pointing out the importance of the understanding of genetic variability and the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in the identification of high-risk individuals, which may eventually lead to preventive measures.
PubMed ID
19042953 View in PubMed
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Asthmatic symptoms after exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates and other pesticides in the Europit field studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153966
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):721-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
D. Boers
L. van Amelsvoort
C. Colosio
E. Corsini
S. Fustinoni
L. Campo
C. Bosetti
C. La Vecchia
T. Vergieva
M. Tarkowski
J. Liesivuori
P. Steerenberg
H. van Loveren
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):721-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - etiology - immunology - urine
Bulgaria
Ethylenebis(dithiocarbamates) - poisoning
Ethylenethiourea - analysis
Female
Finland
Fungicides, Industrial - poisoning
Humans
Italy
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Netherlands
Occupational Diseases - etiology - immunology - urine
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Odds Ratio
Pesticides - poisoning
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - etiology - immunology
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We conducted a multicenter prospective study to assess the effects of occupational exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamate fungicides and/or other pesticides on self-reported asthma and asthmatic symptoms. This multicenter study was conducted among 248 workers exposed to pesticides and 231 non-exposed workers from five field studies. The five field studies were carried out in The Netherlands, Italy, Finland, and two studies in Bulgaria. Subjects constituting this cohort completed a self-administered questionnaire at baseline (before the start of exposure). Ethylenethiourea in urine was determined to assess exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates. In multivariate analyses adjusted for all potential confounders (age, education, residence, smoking, gender, and field study), we found inverse associations, all not statistically significant, between occupational exposure to pesticides and asthma diagnosis (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.15-1.11), complains of chest tightness (OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.36-1.02), wheeze (OR 0.56; 95% CI 0.32-0.98), asthma attack (OR 0.52; 95% CI 0.12-2.25), and asthma medication (OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.25-2.53). Furthermore, we reported null associations for multivariate analysis using ethylenethiourea as determinant for exposure. Although exposure to pesticides remains a potential health risk, our results do not suggest an association between exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates and/or other pesticides used in our study on asthma and asthmatic symptoms.
PubMed ID
19042955 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes and Beliefs of Pig Farmers and Wild Boar Hunters Towards Reporting of African Swine Fever in Bulgaria, Germany and the Western Part of the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277755
Source
Transbound Emerg Dis. 2016 Apr;63(2):e194-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
T. Vergne
C. Guinat
P. Petkova
A. Gogin
D. Kolbasov
S. Blome
S. Molia
J. Pinto Ferreira
B. Wieland
H. Nathues
D U Pfeiffer
Source
Transbound Emerg Dis. 2016 Apr;63(2):e194-204
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Swine Fever - prevention & control
Animal Husbandry - methods
Animals
Bulgaria
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - veterinary
Farmers
Germany
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Logistic Models
Russia
Sus scrofa - virology
Swine - virology
Abstract
This study investigated the attitudes and beliefs of pig farmers and hunters in Germany, Bulgaria and the western part of the Russian Federation towards reporting suspected cases of African swine fever (ASF). Data were collected using a web-based questionnaire survey targeting pig farmers and hunters in these three study areas. Separate multivariable logistic regression models identified key variables associated with each of the three binary outcome variables whether or not farmers would immediately report suspected cases of ASF, whether or not hunters would submit samples from hunted wild boar for diagnostic testing and whether or not hunters would report wild boar carcasses. The results showed that farmers who would not immediately report suspected cases of ASF are more likely to believe that their reputation in the local community would be adversely affected if they were to report it, that they can control the outbreak themselves without the involvement of veterinary services and that laboratory confirmation would take too long. The modelling also indicated that hunters who did not usually submit samples of their harvested wild boar for ASF diagnosis, and hunters who did not report wild boar carcasses are more likely to justify their behaviour through a lack of awareness of the possibility of reporting. These findings emphasize the need to develop more effective communication strategies targeted at pig farmers and hunters about the disease, its epidemiology, consequences and control methods, to increase the likelihood of early reporting, especially in the Russian Federation where the virus circulates.
PubMed ID
25100620 View in PubMed
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Biological monitoring and questionnaire for assessing exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates in a multicenter European field study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153970
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):681-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
S. Fustinoni
L. Campo
J. Liesivuori
S. Pennanen
T. Vergieva
Lgpm van Amelsvoort
C. Bosetti
H. Van Loveren
C. Colosio
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Milan and Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli e Regina Elena, Milan, Italy. silvia.fustinoni@unimi.it
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):681-91
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Bulgaria
Creatine - urine
Environmental Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Ethylenebis(dithiocarbamates) - poisoning
Ethylenethiourea - analysis
Female
Finland
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupations - classification
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
This study deals with pesticide exposure profile in some European countries with a specific focus on ethylenebisdithiocarbamates (EBDC). In all, 55 Bulgarian greenhouse workers, 51 Finnish potato farmers, 48 Italian vineyard workers, 42 Dutch floriculture farmers, and 52 Bulgarian zineb producers entered the study. Each group was matched with a group of not occupationally exposed subjects. Exposure data were gained through self-administered questionnaires and measuring ethylenethiourea (ETU) in two spot urine samples collected, respectively, before the beginning of seasonal exposure (T0), and after 30 days, at the end of the exposure period (T30). Controls underwent a similar protocol. Study agriculture workers were involved in mixing and loading pesticides, application of pesticide mixture with mechanical or manual equipments, re-entry activities, and cleaning equipments. Chemical workers were involved in synthesis, quality controls, and packing activities. The number of pesticides to whom these subjects were exposed varied from one (zineb production) to eight (potato farmers). The use of personal protective devices was variegate and regarded both aerial and dermal penetration routes. EBDC exposure, assessed by T30 urinary ETU, was found to follow the order: greenhouse workers, zineb producers, vineyard workers, potato farmers, floriculture farmers with median levels of 49.6, 23.0, 11.8, 7.5, and 0.9 microg/g creatinine; the last group having ETU at the same level of controls (approximately 0.5 microg/g creatinine). Among agriculture workers, pesticide application, especially using manual equipment, seems to be the major determinant in explaining internal dose. Although the analysis of self-administered questionnaires evidenced difficulties especially related to lack and/or poor quality of reported data, biological monitoring confirms to be a powerful tool in assessing pesticide exposure.
PubMed ID
19042950 View in PubMed
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The comparative burden of salmonellosis in the European Union member states, associated and candidate countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75456
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Birgitta de Jong
Karl Ekdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden. birgitta.dejong@sll.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:4
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bulgaria - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Cost of Illness
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe - epidemiology
European Union - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Prevention
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Salmonella Food Poisoning - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Salmonella enteritidis - isolation & purification
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Turkey - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Salmonella is an infectious agents causing numerous cases of illness each year, and thereby having significant economic impact. Using returning Swedish travellers we estimated the burden of salmonellosis in different European countries. METHODS: From the Swedish database on notifiable communicable diseases 15,864 cases with travel-associated salmonellosis acquired in Europe from 1997-2003 were retrieved. These cases were compared to a dataset from the same years on 14,171 randomly selected Swedish residents, with a history of recent overnight travel in Europe. Distribution of salmonellosis in returning travellers and the distribution of Salmonella Enteritidis was analysed for different member states in the European Union, associated and candidate countries. The risk of being notified with a salmonella infection after return from each European country/region was calculated, and compared with official reporting data rom these countries. Using Norway as reference country, we could 1) construct comparable incidence estimates and 2) calculate the "under-reporting" in each country compared to Norway. RESULTS: The highest burden of salmonellosis was estimated for Bulgaria (2741/100,000), followed by Turkey with 2344/100,000 and Malta with 2141/100,000. S. Enteritidis is the dominating serotype, 66.9 % of all cases and phage type 4 accounts for 37.5 % of the S. Enteritidis cases. CONCLUSION: Using returning tourists as a sentinel population can provide a useful base for comparison of disease burdens in different countries/regions. Focusing prevention of salmonellosis to prevention of egg and poultry associated S. Enteritidis infection will have a major impact from a public health perspective and will significantly lower the burden of disease in most European countries.
PubMed ID
16403230 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coxiella burnetii in ticks and wild birds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299115
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2019 02; 10(2):377-385
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2019
Author
N K Tokarevich
Yu A Panferova
O A Freylikhman
O V Blinova
S G Medvedev
S V Mironov
L A Grigoryeva
K A Tretyakov
T Dimova
M M Zaharieva
B Nikolov
P Zehtindjiev
H Najdenski
Author Affiliation
Saint-Petersburg Pasteur Institute, Laboratory of Zooantroponozes, 14, ul. Mira, 197101, St. Petersburg, Russia. Electronic address: zoonoses@mail.ru.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2019 02; 10(2):377-385
Date
02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Animals, Wild - microbiology
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Baltic States - epidemiology
Bird Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Birds - microbiology
Bulgaria - epidemiology
Coxiella burnetii - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Bacterial - isolation & purification
Disease Reservoirs - microbiology - veterinary
Europe - epidemiology
Feces - microbiology
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Ixodes - microbiology
Nymph - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prevalence
Q Fever - epidemiology - veterinary
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - isolation & purification
Russia - epidemiology
Tick Infestations - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
The study objective was to get more information on C. burnetii prevalence in wild birds and ticks feeding on them, and the potentialities of the pathogen dissemination over Europe by both.
Blood, blood sera, feces of wild birds and ticks removed from those birds or from vegetation were studied at two sites in Russia: the Curonian Spit (site KK), and the vicinity of St. Petersburg (site SPb), and at two sites in Bulgaria: the Atanasovsko Lake (site AL), and the vicinity of Sofia (site SR).
C. burnetii DNA was detected in blood, feces, and ticks by PCR (polymerase chain reaction). All positive results were confirmed by Sanger's sequencing of 16SrRNA gene target fragments. The antibodies to C. burnetii in sera were detected by CFR (complement fixation reaction).
Eleven of 55 bird species captured at KK site hosted Ixodes ricinus. C. burnetii DNA was detected in three I. ricinus nymphs removed from one bird (Erithacus rubecula), and in adult ticks flagged from vegetation: 0.7% I. persulcatus (site SPb), 0.9% I. ricinus (site KK), 1.0% D. reticulatus (AL site). C. burnetii DNA was also detected in 1.4% of bird blood samples at SPb site, and in 0.5% of those at AL site. Antibodies to C. burnetii were found in 8.1% of bird sera (site SPb). C. burnetii DNA was revealed in feces of birds: 0.6% at AL site, and 13.7% at SR site.
Both molecular-genetic and immunological methods were applied to confirm the role of birds as a natural reservoir of C. burnetii. The places of wild bird stopover in Russia (Baltic region) and in Bulgaria (Atanasovsko Lake and Sofia region) proved to be natural foci of C. burnetii infection. Migratory birds are likely to act as efficient "vehicles" in dispersal of C. burnetii -infested ixodid ticks.
PubMed ID
30509727 View in PubMed
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Current status of WHO-DDH International Collaborative Study of Dental Manpower in Relation to Oral Health Status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43136
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1974;2(2):37-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974

64 records – page 1 of 7.