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12 records – page 1 of 2.

[A case of human infection with brucellosis from a cat]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36213
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L P Repina
A I Nikulina
I A Kosilov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Brucella - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Cat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Vectors
English Abstract
Female
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Male
Mice
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Virulence
Abstract
The epidemiological study of a focus of Brucella infection revealed that an outbreak of brucellosis occurred in a small town, and the source of this infection was a domestic cat. As the result of contacts with this cat, six persons, among them three children aged 3, 8 and 12 years, had brucellosis. In all these patients acute brucellosis was diagnosed. Simultaneously with the clinical manifestations of the disease, a rise in antibody titer from 1:50 to 1:1,600 was observed. Brucella cultures isolated from the blood of one of the patients and from the internal organs of the cat exhibited the properties, similar to those of "rodent" strains, i. e. their differential signs permit their classification with B. suis, serovar 5.
PubMed ID
8067119 View in PubMed
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Brucella ceti Infection in a Common Minke Whale ( Balaenoptera acutorostrata ) with Associated Pathology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289807
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 07; 53(3):572-576
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2017
Author
Nicholas J Davison
Lorraine L Perrett
Claire Dawson
Mark P Dagleish
Gary Haskins
Jakub Muchowski
Adrian M Whatmore
Author Affiliation
1 Scottish Marine Animal Strandings Scheme, Scotland's Rural College Veterinary Services, Drummondhill, Inverness, Scotland IV2 4JZ, UK.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 07; 53(3):572-576
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Brucella - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - veterinary
Minke Whale - microbiology
Norway
Scotland
Whales
Abstract
There are three major lineages of marine mammal strains of Brucella spp.: Brucella ceti ST23, found predominantly in porpoises; B. ceti ST26, in pelagic delphinids and ziphiids; and Brucella pinnipedialis ST24/25, predominantly in seals. The isolation of Brucella spp. in mysticetes has been described only in common minke whales ( Balaenoptera acutorostrata ) in Norway and Scotland. We report a third case of Brucella infection and isolation in a minke whale associated with a large abscess. In contrast to the two previous reports that involved isolates of B. pinnipedialis ST24 or the porpoise-associated B. ceti complex ST23, this case was associated with the dolphin-associated B. ceti ST26. Thus, minke whales can be infected naturally with members of all the distinct major lineages of Brucella associated with marine mammals. This report is unique in that the B. ceti ST26 did not originate from a pelagic delphinid or a beaked whale.
PubMed ID
28418765 View in PubMed
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[Brucellosis in Siberia and the Far East].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214176
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1995 Oct-Dec;(4):42-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
A I Kalinovskii
L P Repina
T I Innokent'eva
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1995 Oct-Dec;(4):42-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Animals, Wild
Brucella - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Brucellosis, Bovine - epidemiology - microbiology
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Cattle
Humans
Incidence
Reindeer
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Epidemiological analysis has indicated that rat and reindeer brucellosis foci are of definite value in Siberia and the Far East in the liquidation of brucellosis ones. Foci of cattle and reindeer have been first established, evidence has been provided for the epidemiological significance of fifth-biological variant B. ovis and B. suis, as well as the ecological confinement of peculiar B. rangiferi cultures to the brucellosis foci in the Arctic. To plan antibrucellosis efforts, it is necessary to take into account the incidence of human infection, as well as the insidious circulation of the bacillus in the stock farms.
PubMed ID
8587518 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Rev Sci Tech. 2013 Apr;32(1):27-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
J. Godfroid
B. Garin-Bastuji
C. Saegerman
J M Blasco
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, 9010 Tromsa, Norway. jacques.godfroid@nvh.no
Source
Rev Sci Tech. 2013 Apr;32(1):27-42
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Brucella - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Humans
Livestock
Risk factors
Seroepidemiologic Studies
World Health
Zoonoses
Abstract
The epidemiological link between brucellosis in wildlife and brucellosis in livestock and people is widely recognised. When studying brucellosis in wildlife, three questions arise: (i) Is this the result of a spillover from livestock or a sustainable infection in one or more host species of wildlife? (ii) Does wildlife brucellosis represent a reservoir of Brucella strains for livestock? (iii) Is it of zoonotic concern? Despite their different host preferences, B. abortus and B. suis have been isolated from a variety of wildlife species, whereas B. melitensis is rarely reported in wildlife. The pathogenesis of Brucella spp. in wildlife reservoirs is not yet fully defined. The prevalence of brucellosis in some wildlife species is very low and thus the behaviour of individual animals, and interactions between wildlife and livestock, may be the most important drivers for transmission. Since signs of the disease are non-pathognomonic, definitive diagnosis depends on laboratory testing, including indirect tests that can be applied to blood or milk, as well as direct tests (classical bacteriology and methods based on the polymerase chain reaction [PCR]). However, serological tests cannot determine which Brucella species has induced anti-Brucella antibodies in the host. Only the isolation of Brucella spp. (or specific DNA detection by PCR) allows a definitive diagnosis, using classical or molecular techniques to identify and type specific strains. There is as yet no brucellosis vaccine that demonstrates satisfactory safety and efficacy in wildlife. Therefore, controlling brucellosis in wildlife should be based on good management practices. At present, transmission of Brucella spp. from wildlife to humans seems to be linked to the butchering of meat and dressing of infected wild or feral pig carcasses in thedeveloped world, and infected African buffalo in the developing world. In the Arctic, the traditional consumption of raw bone marrow and the internal organs of freshly killed caribou or reindeer is an important risk factor.
PubMed ID
23837363 View in PubMed
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[Comparative study of the virulence and pathogenicity of cultures of brucella isolated from northern reindeer in the USSR and Alaska].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302396
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1977 Jul;(7):145-6.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
Gorban' LV
Grekova NA
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1977 Jul;(7):145-6.
Date
1977
Language
Russian
Geographic Location
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Brucella/isolation & purification
Brucella/pathogenicity
Guinea Pigs
Reindeer/microbiology
USSR
Virulence
PubMed ID
899447 View in PubMed
Less detail

DISEASE COMPLEXITY IN A DECLINING ALASKAN MUSKOX (OVIBOS MOSCHATUS) POPULATION.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289650
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 04; 53(2):311-329
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
04-2017
Author
Josephine A Afema
Kimberlee B Beckmen
Stephen M Arthur
Kathy Burek Huntington
Jonna A K Mazet
Author Affiliation
1 ? Wildlife Health Center, One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, 1089 Veterinary Medicine Drive, Davis, California 95616, USA.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 04; 53(2):311-329
Date
04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Antibodies, viral
Brucella - isolation & purification
Female
Leptospira - isolation & purification
Parainfluenza Virus 3, Bovine - isolation & purification
Ruminants - microbiology - virology
Abstract
The muskox ( Ovibos moschatus ) population inhabiting the eastern North Slope (ENS) of Alaska, US declined dramatically during 1999-2006, whereas populations in western Alaska (WA) were stable or increasing. To understand morbidity and mortality factors contributing to the decline, Alaska Department of Fish and Game conducted pathologic investigations of carcasses from 2005 until 2008. Additionally, archived sera from both ENS and WA muskoxen collected during 1984-92, before the documented beginning of the ENS decline; sera collected during 2000, near the beginning of the decline; and contemporary sera (from live capture-release, adult females) collected during 2006, 2007, and 2008 were analyzed to determine whether prevalence of antibody to potential pathogens differed in the two areas or changed over time. The pathogens investigated were those that were believed could cause lameness or poor reproduction or adversely affect general health. Furthermore, trace mineral levels, hemograms, and gastrointestinal parasites were evaluated in live adult females captured 2006-08. Pathologic investigations identified several comorbid conditions, including predation, polyarthritis caused by or consistent with Chlamydophila spp. infection, hoof lesions, copper deficiency, contagious ecthyma, verminous pneumonia, hepatic lipidosis suggestive of negative energy balance, and bacterial bronchopneumonia due to Trueperella pyogenes and Bibersteinia trehalosi . Pathogens suspected to be newly introduced in the ENS muskox population on the basis of serologic detection include bovine viral diarrhea, respiratory syncytial virus, Chlamydophila spp., Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii , and Leptospira spp., whereas parainfluenza virus-3 antibody prevalence has increased in the WA population. Although multiple disease syndromes were identified that contributed to mortality and, in combination, likely limited the ENS muskox population, further holistic investigations of disease agents, trace mineral status, and nutritional factors in conjunction with intensive demographic and environmental analyses would provide a better understanding of factors that influence Alaskan muskox populations.
PubMed ID
28099077 View in PubMed
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Experimental Brucella suis type 4 infections in domestic and wild Alaskan carnivores.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4647
Source
J Wildl Dis. 1981 Apr;17(2):183-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
K A Neiland
L G Miller
Source
J Wildl Dis. 1981 Apr;17(2):183-9
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Brucella - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - microbiology - veterinary
Carnivora
Dog Diseases - microbiology
Dogs
Female
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - microbiology - veterinary
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Species Specificity
Ursidae
Abstract
Beagle dogs were readily infected by 1.3 x 10(8) colony forming units (cfu) of Brucella suis type 4 administered either on canned dog food, or intraperitoneally. Such infections were afebrile and otherwise asymptomatic and without any obvious gross lesions. Inoculation of 10(8) cfu B. suis type 4 intraperitoneally into two gravid wolves (Canis lupus) resulted in infections in both animals. About 24 days later they gave birth, apparently at full-term, to two (both alive) and six (two alive and four dead) pups, respectively. Pups born alive died within 24 hours. A black bear (Ursus americanus) infected with between 10(8) and 10(9) cfu yielded serologic and bacteriologic data similar to that derived from the observations on beagles and wolves. Two grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) were both infected by exposure to 1.3 x 10(9) csf B. suis type 4 placed on canned dog food. Antibody titres reached very high levels within the first two months of infection.
PubMed ID
7241703 View in PubMed
Less detail

First isolation of Brucella pinnipedialis and detection of Brucella antibodies from bearded seals Erignathus barbatus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293438
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2018 Mar 22; 128(1):13-20
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Mar-22-2018
Author
Geoffrey Foster
Ingebjørg H Nymo
Kit M Kovacs
Kimberlee B Beckmen
Andrew C Brownlow
Johanna L Baily
Mark P Dagleish
Jakub Muchowski
Lorraine L Perrett
Morten Tryland
Christian Lydersen
Jacques Godfroid
Barry McGovern
Adrian M Whatmore
Author Affiliation
SAC Consulting Veterinary Services, Drummondhill, Stratherrick Road, Inverness IV2 4JZ, UK.
Source
Dis Aquat Organ. 2018 Mar 22; 128(1):13-20
Date
Mar-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Brucella - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - microbiology
Male
Seals, Earless - blood - microbiology
Abstract
Brucella species infecting marine mammals was first reported in 1994 and in the years since has been documented in various species of pinnipeds and cetaceans. While these reports have included species that inhabit Arctic waters, the few available studies on bearded seals Erignathus barbatus have failed to detect Brucella infection to date. We report the first isolation of Brucella pinnipedialis from a bearded seal. The isolate was recovered from the mesenteric lymph node of a bearded seal that stranded in Scotland and typed as ST24, a sequence type associated typically with pinnipeds. Furthermore, serological studies of free-ranging bearded seals in their native waters detected antibodies to Brucella in seals from the Chukchi Sea (1990-2011; 19%) and Svalbard (1995-2007; 8%), whereas no antibodies were detected in bearded seals from the Bering Sea or Bering Strait or from captive bearded seals.
PubMed ID
29565250 View in PubMed
Less detail

Historical perspective of brucellosis: a microbiological and epidemiological overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284682
Source
Infez Med. 2016;24(1):77-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Orhan Akpinar
Source
Infez Med. 2016;24(1):77-86
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biomedical Research - history
Brucella - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - epidemiology - history - microbiology
Denmark
Global Health - history
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Microbiology - history
Nurses
Paintings - history
Physicians - history
Turkey
United Kingdom
United States
Veterinarians - history
Abstract
The historical process of brucellosis extends back to humankind's first contact with animals. Although brucellosis is a sporadic disease observed in animals in certain regions of the world, it is an important disease in humans that can affect many organs and systems due to the consumption of contaminated milk or milk products. Studies have shown that the presence of Brucella dates back to 60 million years ago. In 450 BC, Hippocrates described a disease similar to brucellosis. Since Hippocrates' time, brucellosis has been characterized by fever. Our aim is to investigate selfless work undertaken by scientists on the epidemiology, diagnosis and clinical findings of brucellosis until today, and to gain a historical perspective about the disease that is as old as human history, still has importance today, causes economic losses in treated animals and harms human health.
PubMed ID
27031903 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.