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61 records – page 1 of 7.

[A case of human infection with brucellosis from a cat]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36213
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L P Repina
A I Nikulina
I A Kosilov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Brucella - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Cat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Vectors
English Abstract
Female
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Male
Mice
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Virulence
Abstract
The epidemiological study of a focus of Brucella infection revealed that an outbreak of brucellosis occurred in a small town, and the source of this infection was a domestic cat. As the result of contacts with this cat, six persons, among them three children aged 3, 8 and 12 years, had brucellosis. In all these patients acute brucellosis was diagnosed. Simultaneously with the clinical manifestations of the disease, a rise in antibody titer from 1:50 to 1:1,600 was observed. Brucella cultures isolated from the blood of one of the patients and from the internal organs of the cat exhibited the properties, similar to those of "rodent" strains, i. e. their differential signs permit their classification with B. suis, serovar 5.
PubMed ID
8067119 View in PubMed
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[An immunoenzyme method for detecting Brucella antibodies and antigen in the blood serum of animal breeders from farms with an unfavorable brucellosis situation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213984
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1995 Nov-Dec;(6):53-4
Publication Type
Article

Anti-Brucella Antibodies in Moose (Alces alces gigas), Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), and Plains Bison (Bison bison bison) in Alaska, USA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277206
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2016 Jan;52(1):96-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Ingebjørg Helena Nymo
Kimberlee Beckmen
Jacques Godfroid
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2016 Jan;52(1):96-9
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Animals, Wild
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Bison
Brucella - immunology
Brucellosis - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Deer
Female
Male
Prevalence
Ruminants
Sex Distribution
Abstract
We used an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) and the rose bengal test (RBT) to test for anti-Brucella antibodies in moose (Alces alces gigas), muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), and plains bison (Bison bison bison) from various game management units (GMUs) in Alaska, US, sampled from 1982 to 2010. A portion of the sera had previously been tested with the standard plate test (SPT), the buffered Brucella antigen (BBA) card test, and the card test (CARD). No antibody-positive plains bison were identified. Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected in moose (iELISA, n=4/87; RBT, n=4/87; SPT, n=4/5; BBA, n=4/4) from GMU 23 captured in 1992, 1993, and 1995 and in muskoxen (iELISA, n=4/52; RBT, n=4/52; CARD, n=4/35) from GMUs 26A and 26B captured in 2004, 2006, and 2007. A negative effect of infection on the health of individuals of these species is probable. The presence of antibody-positive animals from 1992 to 2007 suggests presence of brucellae over time. The antibody-positive animals were found in northern Alaska, an area with a historically higher prevalence of Brucella-positive caribou, and a spillover of Brucella suis biovar 4 from caribou may have occurred. Brucella suis biovar 4 causes human brucellosis, and transmission from consumption of moose and muskoxen is possible.
PubMed ID
26540335 View in PubMed
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[Bacteriocinogenicity of brucellae isolated in foci in the Caucasus and their evaluation from taxonomic viewpoints].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241336
Source
Antibiotiki. 1984 Jan;29(1):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1984
Author
I S Tiumentseva
I F Taran
E N Afanas'ev
L I Gramotina
Source
Antibiotiki. 1984 Jan;29(1):29-32
Date
Jan-1984
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic - microbiology
Bacteriocins - biosynthesis - pharmacology
Brucella - classification - isolation & purification - metabolism
Brucella abortus - classification - isolation & purification - metabolism
Brucellosis - microbiology
Chemistry, Physical
Disease Reservoirs
Food Microbiology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Physicochemical Phenomena
Rodentia - microbiology
Russia
Abstract
The aim of the study was to elucidate the possibility of using bacteriocinogenicity of Brucella as taxonomic feature, to determine their phylogenetic relation to other microorganisms by their bacteriocinogenic properties and to investigate the physicochemical properties of brucellacin and conditions for its stable detection. The Brucella cultures were isolated in the Caucasus. Investigation of their capacity for production of bacteriocin according to the procedure described by M.A. Konstantinova and A.D. Garmazova (1979) revealed that 62.1 per cent of the 216 cultures tested produced brucellacin. Isolation of bacteriocin with the methods developed was shown possible in all of the tested strains of B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis and in most of the strains of B. ovis. The methods also provided an increase in the synthesis and activity of brucellacin. The analysis of the characteristic features of bacteriocinogenicity and the properties of bacteriocin allowed recommending the use of additional taxonomic features for identification and differentiation of Brucella. Sensitivity of the indicator strains of Brucella to bacteriocins of other species (F. tularensis, Campylobacter fetus intestinalis B-8833, Y. enterocolitica, Vibrio cholerae and E. coli Fredericq) was noted which was additional evidence of the phylogenic relation between the above organisms. Investigation of the physicochemical properties of brucellacin confirmed the suggestion of the protein nature of the active principle of brucellacin and its similarity in different Brucella species.
PubMed ID
6230043 View in PubMed
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Brucella ceti Infection in a Common Minke Whale ( Balaenoptera acutorostrata ) with Associated Pathology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289807
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 07; 53(3):572-576
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2017
Author
Nicholas J Davison
Lorraine L Perrett
Claire Dawson
Mark P Dagleish
Gary Haskins
Jakub Muchowski
Adrian M Whatmore
Author Affiliation
1 Scottish Marine Animal Strandings Scheme, Scotland's Rural College Veterinary Services, Drummondhill, Inverness, Scotland IV2 4JZ, UK.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 07; 53(3):572-576
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Brucella - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - veterinary
Minke Whale - microbiology
Norway
Scotland
Whales
Abstract
There are three major lineages of marine mammal strains of Brucella spp.: Brucella ceti ST23, found predominantly in porpoises; B. ceti ST26, in pelagic delphinids and ziphiids; and Brucella pinnipedialis ST24/25, predominantly in seals. The isolation of Brucella spp. in mysticetes has been described only in common minke whales ( Balaenoptera acutorostrata ) in Norway and Scotland. We report a third case of Brucella infection and isolation in a minke whale associated with a large abscess. In contrast to the two previous reports that involved isolates of B. pinnipedialis ST24 or the porpoise-associated B. ceti complex ST23, this case was associated with the dolphin-associated B. ceti ST26. Thus, minke whales can be infected naturally with members of all the distinct major lineages of Brucella associated with marine mammals. This report is unique in that the B. ceti ST26 did not originate from a pelagic delphinid or a beaked whale.
PubMed ID
28418765 View in PubMed
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Brucella Infection in Asian Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris lutris) on Bering Island, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290856
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 10; 53(4):864-868
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2017
Author
Tristan L Burgess
Christine Kreuder Johnson
Alexander Burdin
Verena A Gill
Angela M Doroff
Pamela Tuomi
Woutrina A Smith
Tracey Goldstein
Author Affiliation
1 Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center, University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, 1089 Veterinary Medicine Drive, Davis, California 95965, USA.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2017 10; 53(4):864-868
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Bayes Theorem
Brucella - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
DNA, Bacterial - isolation & purification
Female
Islands - epidemiology
Male
Markov Chains
Monte Carlo Method
Otters - microbiology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Rectum - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Infection with Brucella spp., long known as a cause of abortion, infertility, and reproductive loss in domestic livestock, has increasingly been documented in marine mammals over the past two decades. We report molecular evidence of Brucella infection in Asian sea otters (Enhydra lutris lutris). Brucella DNA was detected in 3 of 78 (4%) rectal swab samples collected between 2004 and 2006 on Bering Island, Russia. These 78 animals had previously been documented to have a Brucella seroprevalence of 28%, markedly higher than the prevalence documented in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in North America. All of the DNA sequences amplified were identical to one or more previously isolated Brucella spp. including strains from both terrestrial and marine hosts. Phylogenetic analysis of this sequence suggested that one animal was shedding Brucella spp. DNA with a sequence matching a Brucella abortus strain, whereas two animals yielded a sequence matching a group of strains including isolates classified as Brucella pinnipedialis and Brucella melitensis. Our results highlight the diversity of Brucella spp. within a single sea otter population.
PubMed ID
28715292 View in PubMed
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Brucella melitensis in the Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2491
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 46:155-157.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1955
Author
Toshach, S.R.
Author Affiliation
Provincial Laboratory of Public Health (Edmonton)
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 46:155-157.
Date
1955
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Zoonosis
Brucellosis
Brucella spp.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1887.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 857.
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Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) strain in the mouse model with concurrent exposure to PCB 153.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259939
Source
Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 May;37(3):195-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Ingebjørg H Nymo
Carlos G das Neves
Morten Tryland
Bård-Jørgen Bårdsen
Renato Lima Santos
Andreia Pereira Turchetti
Andrew M Janczak
Berit Djønne
Elisabeth Lie
Vidar Berg
Jacques Godfroid
Source
Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 May;37(3):195-204
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Atlantic Ocean
Brucella - drug effects - immunology - pathogenicity
Brucellosis - immunology - microbiology - pathology - veterinary
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Immunoglobulins - blood
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Population Dynamics
Reproduction - drug effects - physiology
Seals, Earless - microbiology
Spleen - drug effects - immunology - microbiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
Brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis, is linked to reproductive problems in primary hosts. A high proportion of Brucella-positive hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) have been detected in the declined Northeast Atlantic stock. High concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have also been discovered in top predators in the Arctic, including the hooded seal, PCB 153 being most abundant. The aim of this study was to assess the pathogenicity of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in the mouse model and to evaluate the outcome of Brucella spp. infection after exposure of mice to PCB 153. BALB/c mice were infected with B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain or Brucella suis 1330, and half from each group was exposed to PCB 153 through the diet. B. pinnipedialis showed a reduced pathogenicity in the mouse model as compared to B. suis 1330. Exposure to PCB 153 affected neither the immunological parameters, nor the outcome of the infection. Altogether this indicates that it is unlikely that B. pinnipedialis contribute to the decline of hooded seals in the Northeast Atlantic.
PubMed ID
24534631 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1:41-44.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1959
Author
Edwards, S.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Public Health Service, Division of Indian Health
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1:41-44.
Date
1959
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Barrow
Zoonosis
Brucellosis
Brucella spp.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1866.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 852.
Less detail
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 1974 May-Jun; 65(3):202-203.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974
Author
L. Kien
R. Deckelbaum
S. Mishkin
F W Wiglesworth
M. Brazeau
Author Affiliation
Montreal Children's Hospital
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 1974 May-Jun; 65(3):202-203.
Date
1974
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Frobisher Bay
Brucellosis
Brucella spp.
Zoonosis
Arctic Regions
Brucellosis - epidemiology
Canada
Child
Humans
Inuits
Male
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1872.
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61 records – page 1 of 7.