Skip header and navigation

Refine By

104 records – page 1 of 11.

A 1-year comparison of turbuhaler vs pressurized metered-dose inhaler in asthmatic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11215
Source
Chest. 1996 Jul;110(1):53-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
R A Pauwels
F E Hargreave
P. Camus
M. Bukoski
E. Ståhl
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Diseases, University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
Source
Chest. 1996 Jul;110(1):53-7
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - administration & dosage
Adult
Asthma - drug therapy - physiopathology
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage
Budesonide
Comparative Study
Female
Glucocorticoids - administration & dosage
Humans
Male
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Pregnenediones - administration & dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Terbutaline - administration & dosage
Abstract
An open, randomized, parallel-group study was conducted to investigate whether asthmatic patients, considered adequately treated with a corticosteroid and/or short-acting beta 2-agonist via pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI), could be transferred to a corresponding nominal dose of budesonide and/or terbutaline via Turbuhaler, an inspiratory flow-driven multidose dry powder inhaler (Astra Draco; Lund, Sweden), without a decrease in the effect of treatment. One thousand four patients (555 women; mean age, 44 years; mean peak expiratory flow [PEF], 102% predicted normal value) were randomized and treated with either pMDI (current therapy) or Turbuhaler for 52 weeks. The variables studied were asthma-related events, morning PEF, and inhaler-induced clinical symptoms. Asthma-related events were defined in two ways: (1) sum of health-care contacts plus doublings or additions of steroids, and (2) number of 2 consecutive days with PEF less than 80% of baseline. Baseline was obtained from a 2-week run-in period while receiving previous therapy. No statistically significant difference was found in asthma-related events according to definition 1. According to definition 2, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups in favor of Turbuhaler (p = 0.008). The mean number of events was 1.7 with Turbuhaler and 2.2 with pMDI. The mean number of weeks per patient with a PEF less than 90% of baseline was 4.5 with Turbuhaler compared with 6.0 with pMDI (p = 0.002). The sum of inhaler-induced symptoms after 1 year of use was statistically significantly lower with Turbuhaler (0.40) than with pMDI (0.75) (p = 0.0001). In conclusion, budesonide and terbutaline in Turbuhaler offered a superior alternative to corticosteroids and bronchodilators delivered by pMDIs in the maintenance treatment of asthma.
PubMed ID
8681664 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year retrospective study of interhospital patient transport using inhaled nitric oxide in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269280
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 May;59(5):648-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
C. Buskop
P P Bredmose
M. Sandberg
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 May;59(5):648-53
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Critical Care
Equipment Failure - statistics & numerical data
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Norway
Respiratory Insufficiency - mortality - therapy
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Tertiary Care Centers
Transportation of Patients
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Anaesthesiologists from Oslo University Hospital have transported patients with severe oxygenation failure with inhaled nitric oxide (usually 20?ppm) from other hospitals to a tertiary care centre since 2002 in an effort to reduce the number of patients that otherwise would require transport with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient safety during transport with inhaled nitric oxide.
All patient transports with ongoing nitric oxide treatment undertaken from 2003 to 2012 were identified in the transport database. The frequency of adverse events and their impact on patient safety were studied in addition to response to inhaled nitric oxide and adjusted intensive care treatment and time aspects of the transports. Information about in-hospital treatment and survival were extracted from the hospital patient records.
Adverse events were recorded in 12 of the 104 transports. Seven of the adverse events were due to malfunctioning technical equipment, three were related to medication other than the inhaled nitric oxide and two were related to ventilation. No adverse events resulted in permanent negative patient consequences or in discontinuation of the transport. Out of 104 patients, 79 responded to treatment with inhaled nitric oxide and other treatment changes by an increase in oxygen saturation of more than 5%. The 30-day mortality was 27% in the group transported with inhaled nitric oxide.
Transporting patients on inhaled nitric oxide is an alternative in selected patients who would otherwise require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during transport.
PubMed ID
25782015 View in PubMed
Less detail

The acute effects of inhaled salbutamol on the beat-to-beat variability of heart rate and blood pressure assessed by spectral analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208850
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
T. Jartti
T. Kaila
K. Tahvanainen
T. Kuusela
T. Vanto
I. Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Albuterol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Baroreflex - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Bronchospirometry
Child
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Finland
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Respiratory Function Tests
Supine Position
Abstract
We wanted to study the effects of a 600 micrograms inhaled salbutamol dose on the cardiovascular and respiratory autonomic nervous regulation in eight children suffering from bronchial asthma.
In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study we continuously measured electrocardiogram, finger systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and flow-volume spirometry at baseline as well as 20 min and 2 h after the drug inhalation. The R-R interval (the time between successive heart beats) and SAP variabilities were assessed by using spectral analysis. Baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by using cross-spectral analysis.
Salbutamol significantly decreased the total and low frequency (LF) variability of R-R intervals as well as the high frequency (HF) variability of R-R intervals and of SAP. Salbutamol significantly increased the LF/HF ratio of R-R intervals and of SAP, minute ventilation, heart rate and forced pulmonary function in comparison with placebo. The weight of the subjects significantly correlated positively with baroreflex sensitivity and negatively with heart rate after the salbutamol inhalation.
We conclude that the acute salbutamol inhalation decreases cardiovagal nervous responsiveness, increases sympathetic dominance in the cardiovascular autonomic balance, and has a tendency to decrease baroreflex sensitivity in addition to improved pulmonary function.
PubMed ID
9146855 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjustable maintenance dosing with budesonide/formoterol reduces asthma exacerbations compared with traditional fixed dosing: a five-month multicentre Canadian study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9564
Source
Can Respir J. 2003 Nov-Dec;10(8):427-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
J Mark FitzGerald
Malcolm R Sears
Louis-Philippe Boulet
Allan B Becker
Andrew R McIvor
Pierre Ernst
Natasha M Smiljanic-Georgijev
Joanna S M Lee
Author Affiliation
The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. markj@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2003 Nov-Dec;10(8):427-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Adult
Asthma - drug therapy
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Budesonide - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Canada
Child
Costs and Cost Analysis
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Combinations
Ethanolamines - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Adjustable maintenance dosing with budesonide/formoterol in a single inhaler (Symbicort, AstraZeneca, Lund, Sweden) may provide a convenient means of maintaining asthma control with the minimum effective medication level. OBJECTIVES: To compare adjustable and fixed maintenance dosing regimens of budesonide/formoterol in asthma. METHODS: This was an open-label, randomized, parallel-group, multicentre, Canadian study of asthma patients (aged 12 years or older, postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s 70% or greater of predicted normal). Following a one-month run-in on budesonide/formoterol (100/6 mg or 200/6 mg metered doses, two inhalations twice daily), 995 patients were randomly assigned either to continue on this fixed dosing regimen or to receive budesonide/formoterol adjustable dosing (step down to one inhalation twice daily if symptoms were controlled or temporarily step up to four inhalations twice daily for seven or 14 days if asthma worsened). The primary efficacy variable was the occurrence of exacerbations (requiring oral or inhaled corticosteroids, emergency department treatment, serious adverse events or added maintenance therapy because of asthma). RESULTS: With adjustable dosing, significantly fewer patients experienced exacerbations compared with fixed dosing (4.0% versus 8.9%, P=0.002; number needed to treat=21 [95% CI 13 to 59]). Patients required 36% fewer overall doses of budesonide/formoterol (2.5 versus 3.9 inhalations/day, P
PubMed ID
14679407 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Air pollution, eczema and asthma in Sør-Varanger. Is the high consumption of corticosteroid ointments caused by increased tendency for eczema?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16024
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):218-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1993
Author
H G Sunde
K A Holtedahl
Author Affiliation
Kommunehelsetjenesten i Sør-Varanger, Bjørnevatn.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):218-21
Date
Jan-20-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage
Child
Drug Utilization
Eczema - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Ointments
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Many investigations suggest that a high degree of air-borne pollution increases the prevalence of diseases like asthma and eczema. Sør-Varanger Municipality in Finnmark County in the north of Norway receives much air-borne pollution from domestic industry and from the metallurgic industry on the Kola peninsula in North-Western Russia. We have investigated indirect parameters of morbidity caused by asthma and eczema by analyzing data on drug consumption and hospital admissions. In Sør-Varanger there is high consumption of corticosteroids for dermatological use. Consumption of anti-asthmatic drugs and number of admissions to hospital for asthma and eczema were no higher than expected. We suspect that air-borne pollution, particularly the heavy metal nickel, increases the prevalence and perhaps worsens the degree of eczema in Sør-Varanger.
PubMed ID
8430405 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic diseases and the effect of inhaled epinephrine in children with acute bronchiolitis: follow-up from the randomised, controlled, double-blind, Bronchiolitis ALL trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274687
Source
Lancet Respir Med. 2015 Sep;3(9):702-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Håvard Ove Skjerven
Leif Bjarte Rolfsjord
Teresa Løvold Berents
Hanne Engen
Edin Dizdarevic
Cathrine Midgaard
Bente Kvenshagen
Marianne Hanneborg Aas
Jon Olav Gjengstø Hunderi
Karen Eline Stensby Bains
Petter Mowinckel
Kai-Håkon Carlsen
Karin C Lødrup Carlsen
Source
Lancet Respir Med. 2015 Sep;3(9):702-8
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Airway Obstruction - etiology
Bronchiolitis - complications - drug therapy
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage
Child, Preschool
Dermatitis, Atopic - etiology
Double-Blind Method
Epinephrine - administration & dosage
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay
Male
Norway
Skin Tests
Time Factors
Abstract
Although use of inhaled bronchodilators in infants with acute bronchiolitis is not supported by evidence-based guidelines, it is often justified by the belief in a subgroup effect in individuals developing atopic disease. We aimed to assess if inhaled epinephrine during acute bronchiolitis in infancy would benefit patients with later recurrent bronchial obstruction, atopic eczema, or allergic sensitisation.
In the randomised, double-blind, multicentre Bronchiolitis ALL trial, 404 infants with moderate-to-severe acute bronchiolitis were recruited from eight hospitals in Norway to receive either inhaled epinephrine or saline up to every second hour throughout the hospital stay. Randomisation was done centrally, and the two study medications (20 mg/mL racemic epinephrine or 0.9% saline) were prepared in identical bottles. The dose given depended on the infant's weight: 0.10 mL, less than 5 kg; 0.15 mL, 5-6.9 kg; 0.2 mL, 7-9.9 kg; and 0.25 mL, 10 kg or more; all dissolved in 2 mL of 0.9% saline before nebulisation. The primary outcome was the length of hospital stay. In this follow-up study, 294 children were reinvestigated at 2 years of age with an interview, a clinical examination, and a skin prick test for 17 allergens, determining bronchial obstruction, atopic eczema, and allergic sensitisation, on which subgroup analyses were done. Analyses were done by intention to treat. The trial has been completed and is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT00817466) and EUDRACT (number 2009-012667-34).
Length of stay did not differ between patients who received inhaled epinephrine versus saline in the subgroup of infants who developed recurrent bronchial obstruction by age 2 years (143 [48.6%] of 294 patients; p(interaction)=0.40). However, the presence of atopic eczema or allergic sensitisation by the age of 2 years (n=77) significantly interacted with the treatment effect of inhaled epinephrine (p(interaction)=0.02); the length of stay (mean 80.3 h, 95% CI 72.8-87.9) was significantly shorter in patients receiving inhaled epinephrine versus saline in patients without allergic sensitisation or atopic eczema by 2 years (-19.9 h, -33.1 to -6.3; p=0.003). No significant differences were found in length of hospital stay in response to epinephrine or saline in children with atopic eczema or allergic sensitisation by 2 years (+16.2 h, -11.0 to 43.3; p=0.24).
Contrary to our hypothesis, hospital length of stay for bronchiolitis was not reduced by administration of inhaled epinephrine in infants who subsequently developed atopic eczema, allergic sensitisation, or recurrent bronchial obstruction. The present study does not support an individual trial of inhaled epinephrine in acute bronchiolitis in children with increased risk of allergic diseases.
Medicines for Children Network, Norway.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Respir Med. 2015 Sep;3(9):665-726321594
PubMed ID
26321593 View in PubMed
Less detail

An advanced and detailed in vitro validation procedure for the radiolabeling of carrier-free terbutaline sulphate dry powder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10108
Source
J Aerosol Med. 2001;14(2):227-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
P S Walker
G L Petterson
E. Bondesson
J H Conway
Author Affiliation
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, England. P.S.Walker@soton.ac.uk
Source
J Aerosol Med. 2001;14(2):227-36
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Aerosols
Asthma - diagnosis - radionuclide imaging
Bias (epidemiology)
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Humans
Lung - drug effects - radionuclide imaging
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Powders
Sensitivity and specificity
Technetium - administration & dosage - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Terbutaline - administration & dosage - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Tissue Distribution
Abstract
The aerodynamic properties of 99mTc radiolabeled carrier-free terbutaline sulphate (TBS) have been thoroughly investigated following delivery by Turbuhaler (AstraZeneca Lund, Sweden). A full and detailed radiolabeling procedure is also reported. The in vitro radiolabel validation was performed to determine whether TBS radiolabeled in this way would be representative of the commercially available product Bricanyl Turbuhaler during clinical trials. The results indicated that variations in aerodynamic properties had been introduced and that the radiolabel would slightly underestimate the fine particle fraction of Bricanyl, but would nonetheless act as a suitable marker in vivo. Assumptions regarding the aerodynamic properties of doses likely to be received by clinical trial subjects were also examined. This has been achieved by extending the validation procedures beyond those usually reported to include dose number, time, and homogeneity dependent studies. It was found that doses extracted for testing purposes and simulated patient doses extracted shortly afterward had similar properties. Doses extracted 2 h after initial testing also had similar properties to the test doses. These results suggested that data from the test doses could be used for quality control purposes, would be representative of the doses to be received by clinical trial subjects, and that a short delay between initial testing and trial subject inhalation would be acceptable.
PubMed ID
11681654 View in PubMed
Less detail

An indigenous spacer device for drug delivery in severely dyspnoeic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174227
Source
Trop Doct. 2005 Apr;35(2):89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Puneet Sharma
Baljit Singh
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care,Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi 110 002, India.
Source
Trop Doct. 2005 Apr;35(2):89
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchial Spasm - complications - drug therapy
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage
Dyspnea - drug therapy - etiology
Equipment Design
Humans
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Abstract
Bronchodilator aerosols are commonly delivered through nebulizers or metered dose inhalers (MDI) to treat bronchospasm. Although the clinical results obtained with both these devices are comparable, the use of MDI offers several advantages like lower drug dose, reduced risk of complications, reliability of dosing, ease of administration, less personnel time and reduced cost. However, in non-intubated, spontaneously breathing patients, the amount of drug inhaled depends on the coordination of the inspiratory phase and delivery of the drug. In severely dyspnoeic or disoriented patients in the casualty department or intensive care settings, this is often not possible. Valved spacers and breath-actuated inhalers may not be easily available in such situations. Also, the spacer devices cannot be connected to the anatomical facemask and the need to discontinue oxygenation for aerosol delivery further limits their use.
PubMed ID
15970029 View in PubMed
Less detail

Approaches to drug therapy for COPD in Russia: a proposed therapeutic algorithm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290246
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2017; 12:1125-1133
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Kirill A Zykov
Svetlana I Ovcharenko
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Pulmonology, Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry named after A.I. Evdokimov.
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2017; 12:1125-1133
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-2 Receptor Agonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Algorithms
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Clinical Decision-Making
Clinical Protocols
Decision Support Techniques
Drug Administration Schedule
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung - drug effects - physiopathology
Muscarinic Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Patient Selection
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Russia
Spirometry
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Until recently, there have been few clinical algorithms for the management of patients with COPD. Current evidence-based clinical management guidelines can appear to be complex, and they lack clear step-by-step instructions. For these reasons, we chose to create a simple and practical clinical algorithm for the management of patients with COPD, which would be applicable to real-world clinical practice, and which was based on clinical symptoms and spirometric parameters that would take into account the pathophysiological heterogeneity of COPD. This optimized algorithm has two main fields, one for nonspecialist treatment by primary care and general physicians and the other for treatment by specialized pulmonologists. Patients with COPD are treated with long-acting bronchodilators and short-acting drugs on a demand basis. If the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) is =50% of predicted and symptoms are mild, treatment with a single long-acting muscarinic antagonist or long-acting beta-agonist is proposed. When FEV1 is 3%; 2) neutrophilic endotype with peripheral blood neutrophilia >60% or green sputum; or 3) pauci-granulocytic endotype. It is hoped that this simple, optimized, step-by-step algorithm will help to individualize the treatment of COPD in real-world clinical practice. This algorithm has yet to be evaluated prospectively or by comparison with other COPD management algorithms, including its effects on patient treatment outcomes. However, it is hoped that this algorithm may be useful in daily clinical practice for physicians treating patients with COPD in Russia.
Notes
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2013 Apr;41(4):993-5 PMID 23543648
Cites: Thorax. 2002 Oct;57(10):847-52 PMID 12324669
Cites: Respir Res. 2014 Oct 07;15:124 PMID 25287629
Cites: Lancet Respir Med. 2014 Mar;2(3):195-203 PMID 24621681
Cites: Clin Respir J. 2012 Oct;6(4):208-14 PMID 22906068
Cites: Respir Med. 2015 Aug;109(8):1031-9 PMID 26094050
Cites: Respir Res. 2009 Jun 30;10:59 PMID 19566934
Cites: Expert Rev Respir Med. 2012 Aug;6(4):373-5 PMID 22971062
Cites: COPD. 2009 Feb;6(1):59-63 PMID 19229709
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2015 Nov 1;192(9):1068-79 PMID 26177074
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Oct 3;374(9696):1171-8 PMID 19716598
Cites: Allergol Int. 2006 Dec;55(4):395-402 PMID 17130682
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Sep 29;365(13):1184-92 PMID 21991892
Cites: Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Dec;140(3):213-22 PMID 23845862
Cites: Lancet Respir Med. 2015 Apr;3(4):266-8 PMID 25890644
Cites: Respir Med. 2007 Nov;101(11):2395-401 PMID 17629471
Cites: Chin Med J (Engl). 2014;127(14):2594-8 PMID 25043073
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2004 May;23(5):698-702 PMID 15176682
Cites: Chest. 2014 Sep;146(3):611-23 PMID 24833327
Cites: J Bras Pneumol. 2008 Nov;34(11):913-21 PMID 19099097
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015 Sep 02;10:1781-6 PMID 26366070
Cites: Pulm Pharmacol Ther. 2015 Apr;31:85-91 PMID 25197005
Cites: Pulm Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Jun;22(3):177-82 PMID 19038356
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2015 Apr;45(4):969-79 PMID 25573406
Cites: BMC Pulm Med. 2014 Mar 11;14:42 PMID 24618290
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015 Feb 05;10:239-59 PMID 25709423
Cites: Chest. 2002 Apr;121(4):1058-69 PMID 11948033
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2007 May;29(5):906-13 PMID 17301099
Cites: Chest. 2006 Jul;130(1):133-42 PMID 16840393
Cites: Ann Pharmacother. 2012 Dec;46(12):1717-21 PMID 23170031
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2012 Jun 1;185(11):1218-24 PMID 22281834
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Dec 15;380(9859):2095-128 PMID 23245604
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2013 Sep;42(3):647-54 PMID 23258783
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Aug 25;365(8):689-98 PMID 21864166
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010 Sep 1;182(5):598-604 PMID 20522794
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2014 Sep 12;9:963-74 PMID 25246783
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2017 Apr 1;72 (4):1235-1242 PMID 28062684
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000 Feb;161(2 Pt 1):475-8 PMID 10673188
Cites: BMC Pulm Med. 2011 Aug 11;11:42 PMID 21835018
Cites: Chron Respir Dis. 2016 Feb;13(1):13-22 PMID 26396159
Cites: Euro Surveill. 2010 Aug 12;15(32):null PMID 20738994
Cites: PLoS One. 2013 May 31;8(5):e57678 PMID 23741289
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2016 Dec 08;11:3109-3119 PMID 27994450
Cites: Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2014 Apr 25;111(17):293-300 PMID 24828099
Cites: Lancet Respir Med. 2015 Jun;3(6):435-42 PMID 25878028
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Mar 24;364(12):1093-1103 PMID 21428765
Cites: Respir Med. 2014 Apr;108(4):600-8 PMID 24456695
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2016 Aug 22;60(9):5527-32 PMID 27401572
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2016 Jul 01;11:1495-504 PMID 27445469
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Jun 14;371(9629):2013-8 PMID 18555912
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Sep 15;176(6):532-55 PMID 17507545
Cites: Eur J Clin Invest. 2013 May;43(5):510-21 PMID 23489139
Cites: Lancet Respir Med. 2013 May;1(3):199-209 PMID 24429126
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2013 Oct;132(4):828-9 PMID 24001802
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Sep 16;363(12):1128-38 PMID 20843247
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2014 Jun 06;9:597-611 PMID 24944511
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015 Jun 10;10:1093-102 PMID 26089659
Cites: Lancet. 2015 Mar 7;385(9971):857-66 PMID 25684586
Cites: Lancet Respir Med. 2013 Sep;1(7):524-33 PMID 24461613
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2014 May 28;9:551-61 PMID 24920893
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2014 Dec;44(6):1697-700 PMID 25323230
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Aug 1;164(3):358-64 PMID 11500333
PubMed ID
28442899 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between smoking behavior patterns and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a long-term follow-up study among Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134195
Source
Ann Med. 2012 Sep;44(6):598-606
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Maria Hukkinen
Tellervo Korhonen
Kauko Heikkilä
Jaakko Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Hjelt Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. maria.hukkinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Ann Med. 2012 Sep;44(6):598-606
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adult
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cholinergic Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Drug Utilization Review
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - drug therapy - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Low-rate smoking patterns are common, but their pulmonary effects remain poorly known. The study hypothesis was that any level of daily smoking may cause chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We investigated the association between longitudinal smoking patterns and COPD using logistic regressions and survival models adjusted for multiple covariates. Data from Finnish Twin Cohort surveys were used. Participants (n = 21,609) were grouped into categories describing 1981 smoking and change in smoking during 1975-1981. Light smoking was defined as
PubMed ID
21612334 View in PubMed
Less detail

104 records – page 1 of 11.