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58 records – page 1 of 6.

Adjuvant effect of respiratory irritation on pulmonary allergic sensitization: time and site dependency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15794
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1997 Jun;144(2):356-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
P D Siegel
N H Al-Humadi
E R Nelson
D M Lewis
A F Hubbs
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia 26505, USA.
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1997 Jun;144(2):356-62
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - toxicity
Ammonia - toxicity
Animals
Asthma - chemically induced - immunology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Immunoglobulins - blood - drug effects
Irritants - toxicity
Lung - drug effects - immunology - pathology
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - toxicity
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Time Factors
Abstract
It has been suggested that airway irritation, by acting as an adjuvant, as well as producing damage, may be an important factor related to asthma. The present study examined the window of time following acute upper and lower airway irritant exposure to determine the period of increased risk of immunological sensitization. Brown Norway rats were exposed to 87 ppm NO2 or 1000 ppm NH3 for 1 hr. A 30-min ovalbumin (OVA) exposure of 18.14 microg/liter air was given at various times based upon the time course of irritant associated inflammatory response (either immediately prior to or 1 or 7 days after the irritant exposure). OVA-only, NO2-only or NH3-only controls, and saline controls were also studied. Weekly booster exposures of OVA (or saline) were given. Circulating OVA-specific IgE, IgA, and IgG levels were quantified periodically during the 6 weeks of the study. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was also performed to examine the inflammatory response to allergic and irritant challenge. Significant increases in OVA-specific IgE, IgG, and IgA antibody titers were seen in rats given the sensitizing OVA exposure within 1 day of the NO2, but not NH3 exposures. Enhancement of cellular infiltrate in BAL was noted in groups given the sensitizing OVA exposure within 1 day of the NO2 or NH3. It is concluded that the inflammatory and immunological response to antigen exposure can be modified by the site of respiratory tract irritation and the relative times of irritant and antigen exposure.
PubMed ID
9194420 View in PubMed
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Adoptively transferred late allergic airway responses are associated with Th2-type cytokines in the rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57629
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 1997 Jan;16(1):69-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
A. Watanabe
H. Mishima
T C Kotsimbos
M. Hojo
P M Renzi
J G Martin
Q A Hamid
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 1997 Jan;16(1):69-74
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Airway Resistance
Animals
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology - immunology
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology - transplantation
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology - transplantation
Interferon Type II - biosynthesis
Interleukin-2 - biosynthesis
Interleukin-4 - biosynthesis
Interleukin-5 - biosynthesis
Interleukins - biosynthesis
Ovalbumin - immunology
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology
Th2 Cells - immunology
Abstract
Late allergic airway responses can be transferred by CD4+ T cells in the rat. To investigate the role of T-cell cytokines in these responses, we examined the expression of mRNA for Th2 (interleukin [IL]-4 and IL-5) and Th1 (IL-2 and interferon gamma [INF-gamma])-type cytokines in Brown Norway rats that were administered either antigen-primed W3/25(CD4)+ or OX8(CD8)+ T cells. Donors were actively sensitized by subcutaneous injection of ovalbumin (OVA) in the neck and T cells were obtained from the cervical lymph nodes by immunomagnetic cell sorting for administration to unsensitized rats. Control rats received bovine serum albumin (BSA)-primed CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Two days later, recipient rats were challenged with aerosolized OVA, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 8 h after challenge. BAL cells expressing mRNA for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and INF-gamma were analyzed using the technique of in situ hybridization. Recipients of OVA-primed CD4+ T cells had an increase in the fraction of BAL cells expressing mRNA for IL-4 and IL-5 compared with BSA-primed CD4+ or OVA-primed CD8+ cells (P
PubMed ID
8998081 View in PubMed
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Adoptive transfer of allergic airway responses with sensitized lymphocytes in BN rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57674
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Jul;152(1):64-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
A. Watanabe
P. Rossi
P M Renzi
L J Xu
R D Guttmann
J G Martin
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Jul;152(1):64-70
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Eosinophils - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Immunotherapy, Adoptive
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology - physiopathology
Serum Albumin, Bovine - immunology
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
To evaluate the role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of allergic bronchoconstriction, we investigated whether allergic airway responses are adoptively transferred by antigen-primed lymphocytes in Brown Norway (BN) rats. Animals were actively sensitized to ovalbumin (OA) or sham sensitized, and 14 d later mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from intrathoracic lymph nodes, passed through a nylon wool column, and transferred to naive syngeneic rats. Recipients were challenged with aerosolized OA or bovine serum albumin (BSA) (5% wt/vol) and analyzed for changes in lung resistance (RL), airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine (MCh), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells. Recipients of MNCs from sensitized rats responded to OA inhalation and exhibited sustained increases in RL throughout the 8-h observation period, but without usual early airway responses. Recipients of sham-sensitized MNCs or BSA-challenged recipients failed to respond to antigen challenge. At 32 h after OA exposure, airway responsiveness to MCh was increased in four of seven rats that had received sensitized MNCs (p = 0.035). BAL eosinophils increased at 32 h in the recipients of both sensitized and sham-sensitized MNCs. However, eosinophil numbers in BAL were inversely correlated with airway responsiveness in the recipients of sensitized MNCs (r = -0.788, p = 0.036). OA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) was undetectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in recipient rats following adoptive transfer. In conclusion, allergic late airway responses (LAR) and cholinergic airway hyperresponsiveness, but not antigen-specific IgE and early responses, were adoptively transferred by antigen-primed lymphocytes in BN rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7599864 View in PubMed
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Airway macrophages from patients with asthma do not proliferate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15993
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1993 Dec;92(6):869-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
P. Chanez
P. Vago
P. Demoly
L. Cornillac
P. Godard
J P Bureau
F B Michel
J. Bousquet
Author Affiliation
Clinique des Maladies Respiratoires and Contrat Jeune Formation INSERM 92-10, Montpellier, France.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1993 Dec;92(6):869-77
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Asthma - immunology - metabolism - pathology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Cell Cycle
DNA - analysis
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Ki-67 Antigen
Macrophages, Alveolar - chemistry - immunology - pathology
Male
Mice
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Proteins - immunology - metabolism
Nuclear Proteins - immunology - metabolism
Ploidies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Macrophages are involved in asthma, but their pulmonary turnover is unknown. We compared the ability of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and bronchial macrophages to proliferate in normal subjects and patients with asthma. METHODS: BAL cells from eight patients with asthma and eight normal volunteers were separated with a discontinuous Percoll gradient (Pharmacia Fine Chemicals, Uppsala, Sweden). In a first experiment, nuclei of each alveolar macrophage (AM) fraction, stained with propidium iodide, were analyzed for DNA content with a flow cytometer, and the proportions of cells in the G0/G1, S, and G2 + M phases were determined. In a second experiment, expression of Ki-67-related antigen was sought on AMs by immunocytochemistry. Macrophages from 10 patients with asthma and 10 normal volunteers were studied in biopsy specimens by means of immunohistochemistry with a panmacrophage monoclonal antibody (HAM-56) and a monoclonal antibody against proliferating cell nuclear antigen. RESULTS: The proportions of BAL AMs in the different phases of the cell cycle were similar in normal subjects and patients with asthma for all fractions, and the percentage of cells in S and G2 +/- M phases ranged from 7.3% to 11.3%. Under 1% of BAL AMs expressed Ki-67-related antigen. None of the macrophages present in the biopsy specimens expressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not indicate that an important source of airway macrophages is local proliferation.
PubMed ID
8258621 View in PubMed
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Anti-inflammatory effect and soft properties of etiprednol dicloacetate (BNP-166), a new, anti-asthmatic steroid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15156
Source
Pharmazie. 2004 May;59(5):412-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
I. Kurucz
K. Németh
S. Mészáros
K. Török
Z. Nagy
Z. Zubovics
K. Horváth
N. Bodor
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunopharmacology, IVAX Drug Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary.
Source
Pharmazie. 2004 May;59(5):412-6
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - pharmacokinetics - pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - pharmacokinetics - pharmacology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Biotransformation
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Budesonide - pharmacology
Cell Division - drug effects
Cell Line
Chromatography, Liquid
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Granulocytes - drug effects
Humans
Interleukin-1 - biosynthesis
Lectins - pharmacology
Lipopolysaccharides - pharmacology
Male
Monocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - metabolism
Abstract
In vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties and soft characteristics of etiprednol dicloacetate (BNP-166) a new steroid, which has been developed for the treatment of asthma, were investigated in this study. The compound effectively decreased cytokine production in lipopolysaccharide stimulated lymphocytes and attenuated lectin-induced proliferation of blood mononuclear cells in tissue culture. In an animal model of allergen sensitized and challenged Brown Norway rats, using topical treatment, etiprednol dicloacetate substantially attenuated the extent of allergen induced bronchoalveolar fluid eosinophilia. At every examined parameter its pharmacological effects were comparable to those of budesonide. By means of in vitro biological and analytical methods the soft character of BNP-166 was also investigated. The anti-inflammatory effect of etiprednol dicloacetate in vitro was shown to be the function of the quantity of serum components, present in the assay. This loss of activity was most likely the result of the fast metabolism of etiprednol dicloacetate, which in the presence of sera could have been demonstrated by LC/MS/MS. Our data indicate that the significant local effect of the compound will very likely be accompanied with a drastically reduced systemic activity indicating an encouraging selectivity of the pharmacological action of etiprednol dicloacetate.
PubMed ID
15212312 View in PubMed
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Attenuation of virus-induced airway dysfunction in rats treated with imiquimod.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15748
Source
Eur Respir J. 1998 Feb;11(2):324-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
J R Stokes
R L Sorkness
M R Kaplan
W L Castleman
M A Tomai
R L Miller
R F Lemanske
Author Affiliation
Division of Allergy and Immunology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1998 Feb;11(2):324-9
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - therapeutic use
Aminoquinolines - therapeutic use
Animals
Body Weight - drug effects
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Inflammation - pathology - virology
Interferons - blood
Male
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Tract Diseases - pathology - virology
Respirovirus - isolation & purification
Respirovirus Infections - complications - drug therapy - virology
Abstract
Viral respiratory infections cause acute airway abnormalities consisting of inflammation and physiological dysfunction in both animals and humans. It is likely that inflammatory cell products, such as cytokines, contribute substantially to viral-induced airway dysfunction. We hypothesized that imiquimod, an immune response enhancing agent that induces interferon-alpha, would attenuate the development of airway dysfunction during acute viral illness in rats. Adult Brown Norway rats were inoculated with parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus or sterile vehicle, and treated with either imiquimod or water. Respiratory system resistance (Rrs), arterial oxygen tension (Pa,O2), lung viral titres and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) leucocyte counts were measured in anaesthetized, paralysed, ventilated rats. Virus-infected, water-treated rats had a significant decrease in Pa,O2 and had significant increases in leucocyte count and Rrs when compared to both the virus-infected, imiquimod-treated, (Pa,O2, p = 0.03; leucocyte count, p = 0.02; and Rrs, p = 0.009) and noninfected, water-treated rats (Pa,O2, p = 0.007; leucocyte count, p = 0.001; and Rrs, p = 0.01). In addition, imiquimod suppressed BAL eosinophils in both virus-infected (p = 0.02) and noninfected (p = 0.001) groups, and lowered overall virus titres (p = 0.03). Thus, both virus-induced airway inflammation and physiological dysfunction were attenuated significantly by imiquimod treatment in this animal model. By further delineating mechanisms by which infections induce airway dysfunction in animal models, more specific pharmacological interventions can be developed for the treatment of virus-induced asthma.
PubMed ID
9551732 View in PubMed
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Automatic leukocyte differentiation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of guinea pigs and brown-Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15858
Source
J Pharmacol Toxicol Methods. 1996 Apr;35(2):91-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
A. Hatzelmann
D. Haefner
R. Beume
C. Schudt
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry, Byk Gulden, Konstanz, Germany.
Source
J Pharmacol Toxicol Methods. 1996 Apr;35(2):91-9
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Coloring Agents
Drug Hypersensitivity - etiology
Guinea Pigs
Leukocyte Count - methods
Male
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage
Rats
Serine Proteinase Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Abstract
Asthma is considered to be a chronic inflammatory response of the airways characterized by a leukocyte infiltration into the lungs. Whereas lymphocytes and macrophages are involved in the initiation and propagation of inflammation, both neutrophils and in particular eosinophils are considered to play major effector roles. Therefore, allergic animal models in various species have been established to assess leukocyte infiltration by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of antigen-sensitized and antigen-challenged animals as an inflammatory parameter in asthma pharmacology. Differential leukocyte counts in BAL fluids are routinely assessed by visual microscopic analysis of stained slides after cytocentrifugation. This procedure is very time-consuming, and the underlying standard morphological criteria may vary between different observers. In the present paper, we propose an alternative automatic method for leukocyte differentiation in BAL fluids from ovalbumin-treated guinea pigs and Brown-Norway rats using Cobas Helios 5Diff from Hoffmann-La Roche. BAL samples are directly applied to the analyzer and are automatically mixed with "Eosinofix," which stabilizes leukocyte membranes and specifically stains eosinophils. By a combination of electric (resistance) and optical (light scatter) analysis, the lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils are discriminated and the total leukocyte numbers are obtained. For both animal species we found high correlations for all leukocyte populations by comparing the results obtained with Cobas Helios 5Diff and conventional microscopic analysis. The major advantage of the automatic method is the much lower (about one-third) time requirement.
PubMed ID
8729435 View in PubMed
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[Bronchoalveolar lavage in the diagnosis of occupational pulmonary diseases in miners]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69335
Source
Lik Sprava. 2003 Jul-Aug;(5-6):114-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
L L Filipchenko
M Ie Slinchenko
O M Sydorenko
Source
Lik Sprava. 2003 Jul-Aug;(5-6):114-6
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchitis - diagnosis - etiology - immunology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Bronchoscopy
Chronic Disease
Coal Mining
Diagnosis, Differential
Dust - analysis
English Abstract
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Lung Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Macrophages, Alveolar - immunology
Male
Occupational Exposure
Pneumoconiosis - diagnosis - etiology - pathology
Silicotuberculosis - diagnosis - etiology - pathology
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
One of objective methods of early and differential diagnosis of occupational pulmonary diseases in miners (pneumoconiosis, silicotuberculosis, dust bronchitis) is bronchoscopy with a cytologic examination of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAF). BAF-examination was carried out in a total of 88 patients with incipient and advanced forms of dust bronchitis, pneumoconiosis and silicotuberculosis. A direct relationship has been revealed between a decline in local cell-bound immunity caused by a dust-inducted affection mononuclear phagocytes and advancing of stages of dust-related diseases.
PubMed ID
14618822 View in PubMed
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Brown Norway rats are high responders to bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and bronchiolar mastocytosis induced by parainfluenza virus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24697
Source
Exp Lung Res. 1991 Nov-Dec;17(6):1025-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
S D Sorden
W L Castleman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706.
Source
Exp Lung Res. 1991 Nov-Dec;17(6):1025-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Bronchi
Bronchial Diseases - microbiology
Bronchiolitis - microbiology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Cell Count
Lung - microbiology
Male
Mast Cells - pathology
Mastocytosis - microbiology
Orthomyxoviridae Infections - complications
Parainfluenza Virus 1, Human - isolation & purification
Pneumonia, Viral - microbiology
Rats - physiology
Rats, Inbred F344
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory System - pathology
Abstract
The pathogenesis of parainfluenza 1 (Sendai) virus infection was compared among 25-day-old BN, F344, and LEW rats to identify a sensitive as well as a resistant inbred rat strain to Sendai virus-induced lung injury during early life. At 7 days after inoculation, BN rats had 65-fold higher (P less than .001) pulmonary viral titers and threefold higher (P less than .002) numbers of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid than did F344 rats. At 14 days after inoculation, when most virus-induced inflammation had been resolved, BN rats had a threefold greater (P less than .01) incidence of bronchioles with aggregates of lymphocytes and macrophages than did F344 rats. Control BN rats had higher numbers of bronchiolar eosinophils than did F344 or LEW rats. Although viral inoculation resulted in increased numbers of bronchiolar mast cells in all three strains at 14 days, bronchiolar mast cell density was greater (P less than .005) in virus-inoculated BN and LEW rats than in F344 rats. We conclude that BN rats are high responders and F344 rats are low responders to Sendai virus-induced bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and airway mastocytosis. These strain differences may be useful in elucidating important pathogenetic mechanisms in virus-induced airway injury and mastocytosis.
PubMed ID
1663031 View in PubMed
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CD8+ T cells modulate late allergic airway responses in Brown Norway rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57532
Source
J Immunol. 1999 Nov 15;163(10):5574-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1999
Author
M. Suzuki
R. Taha
D. Ihaku
Q. Hamid
J G Martin
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Immunol. 1999 Nov 15;163(10):5574-81
Date
Nov-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Animals
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology - immunology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology - metabolism - transplantation
Cytokines - biosynthesis
Flow Cytometry
Hypersensitivity, Delayed - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Leukocytes, Mononuclear - cytology - immunology
Lymph Nodes - cytology - immunology - metabolism
Lymphocyte Count
Lymphocyte Subsets - cytology - immunology
Male
Ovalbumin - blood - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spleen - cytology - immunology - metabolism
Abstract
To test the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells may suppress the allergen-induced late airway response (LAR) and airway eosinophilia, we examined the effect of administration of Ag-primed CD8+ T cells on allergic airway responses, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) leukocytes, and mRNA expression for cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma) in OVA-sensitized Brown Norway rats. On day 12 postsensitization to OVA, test rats were administered 2 million CD8+ T cells i.p. isolated from either the cervical lymph nodes (LN group; n = 8) or the spleen (Spl group; n = 6) of sensitized donors. On day 14, test rats were challenged with aerosolized OVA. Control rats were administered PBS i.p. on day 12, and challenged with OVA (n = 10) or BSA (n = 6) on day 14. The lung resistance was measured for 8 h after challenge. BAL was performed at 8 h. Cytospin slides of BAL were analyzed for major basic protein by immunostaining and for cytokine mRNA by in situ hybridization. The LAR was significantly less in the LN group (1.8 +/- 0.5 U; p
PubMed ID
10553086 View in PubMed
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58 records – page 1 of 6.