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[Clinical features of pulmonary diseases caused by chrysotile asbestos dust].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195169
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(11):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
E I Likhacheva
A L Iarina
E R Vagina
M S Klimina
T Iu Obukhova
T A Dovgoliuk
S V Kashanskii
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(11):30-3
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Bronchitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Dust - adverse effects
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
The authors studied clinical, roentgenologic and functional signs of asbestosis and chronic dust bronchitis in 57 workers engaged into extraction and processing of asbestos. Occupational peripheral lung cancer was revealed in 4 cases. Chronic dust bronchitis appeared to be diagnosed with delay, usually at I-II stages.
PubMed ID
11280281 View in PubMed
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[Features of respiratory diseases in ecologically unfavorable region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195596
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(1):18-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L A Tarasova
E A Lobanova
V V Milishnikova
N A Khelkovskii-Sergeev
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(1):18-23
Date
2001
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bronchitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Chronic Disease
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lung - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Examination of 400 workers in Bratsk aluminium plant proved respiratory diseases formation to be influenced by both occupational factors and various toxic chemicals that are released into atmosphere by other industrial polluters. Structure of respiratory diseases is represented mainly by diffuse pneumoconiosis caused by toxic and dust factors. Prophylaxis of those diseases should be aimed not only to better work conditions, but also to specify measures improving regional ecologic situation.
PubMed ID
11221105 View in PubMed
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Follow-up study of pulmonary function and respiratory tract symptoms in workers in a Swedish iron ore mine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67970
Source
J Occup Med. 1988 Dec;30(12):953-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988
Author
H S Jörgensen
B. Kolmodin-Hedman
N. Stjernberg
Author Affiliation
LKAB, Medical Department, Kiruna, Sweden.
Source
J Occup Med. 1988 Dec;30(12):953-8
Date
Dec-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bronchitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Cough - diagnosis - etiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iron
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Mucociliary Clearance
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
In 1967, 240 workers in the Kiruna, Sweden, mine were examined with regard to lung function and respiratory symptoms. Seventeen years later, 167 of these workers were reexamined using a structured interview which covered respiratory symptoms, smoking habits, and workplace, and lung function tests, including dynamic spirometry and closing volume. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis in the present study was 9.6%. There was a strong relationship between chronic bronchitis and smoking but no relationship between chronic bronchitis and working underground in the mine. Only three persons had chronic obstructive lung disease. In the still active mine workers, dynamic spirometry results showed no difference between smokers or nonsmokers or between underground and surface workers. Thus, we found no excess of chronic obstructive lung disease or lung function disturbances in the mine workers studied. This probably reflects a self-selection process whereby the workers with airway obstruction due to smoking or underground exposure have left underground work and also the company. Underground workers with chronic mucous hypersecretion, on the other hand, have not felt motivated, because of this, to leave underground work. Some, however, may have stopped smoking but not necessarily because of the hypersecretion.
PubMed ID
3230447 View in PubMed
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