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[67-year-old Ukrainian patient with cough since childhood. What is the cause of severe hemoptysis? Bronchiectasis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58630
Source
MMW Fortschr Med. 2001 May 17;143(20):55-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2001
Author
I A Harsch
Author Affiliation
Medizinische Klinik I mit Poliklinik der Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Krankenhausstrasse 12, D-91054 Erlangen.
Source
MMW Fortschr Med. 2001 May 17;143(20):55-6
Date
May-17-2001
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bronchiectasis - diagnosis
Cough - etiology
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Hemoptysis - etiology
Humans
Infant
PubMed ID
11400614 View in PubMed
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Adult outcomes of childhood bronchiectasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306824
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1731059
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2020
Author
Dawn Sibanda
Rosalyn Singleton
John Clark
Christine Desnoyers
Ellen Hodges
Gretchen Day
Gregory Redding
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation, Bethel, AK, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1731059
Date
12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Alaskan Natives - statistics & numerical data
Bronchiectasis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Recurrence
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Vital Capacity
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent literature has highlighted the importance of transition from paediatric to adult care for children with chronic conditions. Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis is an important cause of respiratory morbidity in low-income countries and in indigenous children from affluent countries; however, there is little information about adult outcomes of childhood bronchiectasis. We reviewed the clinical course of 31 Alaska Native adults 20-40 years of age from Alaska's Yukon Kuskokwim Delta with childhood bronchiectasis. In patients with chronic suppurative lung disease, a diagnosis of bronchiectasis was made at a median age of 4.5 years by computerised tomography (68%), bronchogram (26%), and radiographs (6%). The patients had a median of 75 lifetime respiratory ambulatory visits and 4.5 hospitalisations. As children, 6 (19%) experienced developmental delay; as adults 9 (29%) experienced mental illness or handicap. Four (13%) patients were deceased, four (13%) had severe pulmonary impairment in adulthood, 17 (54%) had persistent or intermittent respiratory symptoms, and seven (23%) were asymptomatic. In adulthood, only five were seen by adult pulmonologists and most had no documentation of a bronchiectasis diagnosis. Lack of provider continuity, remote location and co-morbidities can contribute to increased adult morbidity. Improving the transition to adult care starting in adolescence and educating adult providers may improve care of adults with childhood bronchiectasis.
PubMed ID
32090714 View in PubMed
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Asthma-associated bronchiectasis: More attention needed!

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308831
Source
Respir Med. 2020 01; 161:105789
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Date
01-2020
Author
Bi-Cui Liu
Ting-Xuan Huang
Dan Yang
Ling Yang
Chun-Tao Liu
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, West China School of Medicine and West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China; Respiratory Department, The Bishan Hospital of Chongqing, Chongqing, China.
Source
Respir Med. 2020 01; 161:105789
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Comment
Keywords
Asthma
Bronchiectasis
Finland
Humans
Notes
CommentOn: Respir Med. 2019 Jun;152:105-111 PMID 31128603
PubMed ID
31561926 View in PubMed
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Source
New England Journal of Medicine. 1974 Dec 26; 291(26):1419.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974
Author
Herxheimer, H.
Schaefer, O.
Author Affiliation
Charles Camsell Hospital (Edmonton)
Source
New England Journal of Medicine. 1974 Dec 26; 291(26):1419.
Date
1974
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Eczema
Chronic bronchitis
Bronchiectasis
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology
Canada
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2561.
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Bronchial and peripheral airway nitric oxide in primary ciliary dyskinesia and bronchiectasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99059
Source
Respir Med. 2009 May;103(5):700-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
A. Shoemark
R. Wilson
Author Affiliation
Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney Street, London, SW3 6NP, UK.
Source
Respir Med. 2009 May;103(5):700-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis
Breath Tests - methods
Bronchiectasis - etiology - metabolism - physiopathology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Kartagener Syndrome - complications - metabolism - physiopathology
London
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Sputum - microbiology
Abstract
Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic condition resulting in bronchiectasis. Exhaled gas nitric oxide (FE(NO)) is reduced in PCD. A model of pulmonary NO exchange dynamics can be used to demonstrate relative contributions of bronchial (J'aw(NO)) and peripheral airway (Calv(NO)) NO to the final FE(NO) concentration. The aim of this study was to compare bronchial and peripheral airway contribution to FE(NO) in patients with PCD, non-PCD bronchiectasis and healthy controls in order to establish the source of present FE(NO) in these conditions and to compare these with severity of disease. NO was measured at 50, 100, and 200 ml/s using an NO analyser (NiOx Sweden). J'aw(NO) and Calv(NO) were calculated according to a model of pulmonary exchange dynamics. PCD patients had reduced levels of J'aw(NO) compared to healthy controls whereas patients with non-PCD bronchiectasis had elevated J'aw(NO) levels. There was no difference in Calv(NO) between the three groups. In the disease groups Calv(NO) correlated negatively with FEV(1). In conclusion patients with PCD had significantly reduced FE(NO) at all expiratory flow rates. This was due to a significantly low bronchial NO. In contrast, peripheral airway NO was increased with more severe disease.
PubMed ID
19117740 View in PubMed
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Bronchiectasis: an orphan disease with a poorly-understood prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15757
Source
Eur Respir J. 1997 Dec;10(12):2784-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
T. Keistinen
O. Säynäjäkangas
T. Tuuponen
S L Kivelä
Author Affiliation
Dept of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1997 Dec;10(12):2784-7
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Bronchiectasis - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Abstract
The prognosis and risk factors for bronchiectasis are at present poorly known. The aim of this study was to examine the long-term prognosis and cause of death in this disease. The National Hospital Discharge Register was used to search for patients aged 35-74 yrs, with newly-diagnosed bronchiectasis in the period 1982-1986. Each of the 842 patients identified was matched with an asthmatic patient and a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), who were of the same age and sex and who had been treated in hospital at the same time. The use of hospital services by these subjects was examined up to the end of 1992, and mortality to the end of 1993. The prognosis for the bronchiectatic patients treated in hospital was better than that for the COPD patients but poorer than that for the asthmatics; the risk of death being 1.25 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.15-1.36) for the COPD patients and 0.79 (95% CI 0.71-0.87) for the asthmatics, relative to the bronchiectatic patients. Bronchiectasis was the main cause of death in 13% of bronchiectatic patients, the risk of death being increased by a factor of 1.21 in the presence of asthma as the main secondary diagnosis, by 1.31 with COPD, by 1.35 with tuberculosis and its sequelae, and by 1.32 with some other secondary diagnosis, as compared with cases for which no secondary diagnosis was indicated. The fact that the prognosis for bronchiectatic patients is poorer than that for asthmatics points to a continued need for focused care and follow-up, particularly in the presence of additional illnesses.
PubMed ID
9493661 View in PubMed
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Bronchiectasis in Alaska Native children: causes and clinical courses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3830
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2000 Mar;29(3):182-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
R. Singleton
A. Morris
G. Redding
J. Poll
P. Holck
P. Martinez
D. Kruse
L R Bulkow
K M Petersen
C. Lewis
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, Alaska, USA. ris2@cdc.gov
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2000 Mar;29(3):182-7
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Asthma - complications - physiopathology
Bronchiectasis - etiology - physiopathology - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Foreign Bodies - complications
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Lung - physiopathology
Pneumonectomy
Pneumonia - complications - physiopathology
Pneumonia, Aspiration - complications
Pneumonia, Bacterial - complications
Prevalence
Recurrence
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - complications
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
Although bronchiectasis has become a rare condition in U.S. children, it is still commonly diagnosed in Alaska Native children in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta. The prevalence of bronchiectasis has not decreased in persons born during the 1980s as compared with those born in the 1940s. We reviewed case histories of 46 children with bronchiectasis. We observed that recurrent pneumonia was the major preceding medical condition in 85% of patients. There was an association between the lobes affected by pneumonia and the lobes affected by bronchiectasis. Eight (17%) patients had surgical resection of involved lobes. We conclude that the continued high prevalence of bronchiectasis appears to be related to extremely high rates of infant and childhood pneumonia. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2000;29:182-187. Published 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
PubMed ID
10686038 View in PubMed
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Bronchiectasis in Alaskan Native children

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6381
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):517-523
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1968
517 Pulmonary Diseases Bronchiectasis in Alaska Native Children J. Kenneth Fleshman, MD; Joseph F. Wilson, MD; and J. Jerome Cohen, MD, Anchorage, Alaska DISEASE of the respiratory tract ac- count.s for a disproportionate amount of morbidity and mortality in the Alaska Na- tive population
  1 document  
Author
Fleshman, J.K
Wilson, J.F
Cohen, J.J
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):517-523
Date
Oct-1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alaska
Bronchiectasis - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Bronchography
Child
Child, Preschool
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Inuits
Male
Otitis Media - complications
Pneumonia
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications
Sex Factors
Tuberculosis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2558.
PubMed ID
5687553 View in PubMed
Documents

67-13-Bronchiectasis-in-Alaska-Native-Children.pdf

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Bronchiectasis in children: orphan disease or persistent problem?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3821
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2002 Jun;33(6):492-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Charles W Callahan
Gregory J Redding
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii 96859-5000, USA. charles.callahan@amedd.army.mil
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2002 Jun;33(6):492-6
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchiectasis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Humans
World Health
Abstract
More than a decade ago, bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis was termed an "orphan disease", because it had become an uncommon clinical entity among children in the developed world. Bronchiectasis is more common among children in lower socioeconomic classes and in developing countries, presumably due to more frequent and recurrent respiratory infections, environmental airway irritants, poor immunization rates, and malnutrition. Reports from the Southern Pacific and from Alaska Native children reveal persistently high rates of childhood bronchiectasis. Better epidemiologic data throughout the world are needed to reassess the importance of this condition. The pathophysiology includes airway inflammation, mucus production, and regional airway obstruction, yet the reasons why some children develop bronchiectasis while other do not is unclear. The coexistence of asthma with bronchiectasis is associated with more severe disease, yet the impact of asthma therapy in children with both disorders has not been studied. Similarly, the pattern of antibiotic use for children with bronchiectasis varies by region with little data to justify one particular approach. It may be that public health measures aimed at improving living conditions for children and prevention of respiratory infections with antiviral vaccines will have more impact on childhood bronchiectasis than medical treatments in the future.
PubMed ID
12001284 View in PubMed
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65 records – page 1 of 7.