Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

CD4+ T cells can induce airway hyperresponsiveness to allergen challenge in the brown norway rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57554
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Dec;158(6):1863-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
H. Mishima
M. Hojo
A. Watanabe
Q A Hamid
J G Martin
Author Affiliation
Meakins-Christie Laboratories, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, and the Respiratory Health Network of Centres of Excellence, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Dec;158(6):1863-70
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - chemistry - immunology
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Cattle
Comparative Study
Eosinophilia - immunology
Gene Expression Regulation
Immunization
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
In Situ Hybridization
Interferon Type II - genetics - immunology
Interleukin-5 - genetics - immunology
Male
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Ovalbumin - immunology
Proteins - analysis
RNA, Messenger - genetics
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serum Albumin, Bovine - immunology
Time Factors
Abstract
Airway hyperresponsiveness to inhalational challenge with methacholine (MCh) develops by 32 h after allergen challenge of actively sensitized BN rats. To test the hypothesis that CD4+ T cells mediate allergen-induced hyperresponsiveness independent of IgE-mediated mechanisms, we administered CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and a mixture of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (total T cells) isolated from the cervical lymph nodes of rats sensitized with ovalbumin (OA) to naive BN rats that underwent aerosol challenge with either OA or bovine serum albumin (BSA) 2 d later. Responsiveness to MCh was measured 2 d before transfer of T cells and 32 h after challenge with OA or BSA. Airway responsiveness increased significantly in recipients of CD4+ T cells after OA challenge, but not in any other of the treatment groups. Analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells for major basic protein expression by immunostaining showed eosinophilia in OA-challenged CD4+ and total T-cell recipients. Cells retrieved by bronchoalveolar lavage showed increased expression of IL-5 mRNA (in situ hybridization) in CD4+ T cell recipients after OA challenge compared with other groups. Interferon-gamma mRNA was expressed to the greatest extent in CD8+ recipients, but it was elevated in both OA- and BSA-challenged animals. We conclude that CD4+ T cells can induce airway hyperresponsiveness after inhalational challenge with allergen and this is associated with IL-5 production and eosinophilia. CD8+ T cells may have a negative regulatory effect on responsiveness, possibly mediated by interferon-gamma.
PubMed ID
9847279 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cold air inhalation and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in relationship to metacholine bronchial responsiveness: different patterns in asthmatic children and children with other chronic lung diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15737
Source
Respir Med. 1998 Feb;92(2):308-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
K H Carlsen
G. Engh
M. Mørk
E. Schrøder
Author Affiliation
Voksentoppen Centre of Asthma, Allergy and Chronic Lung Diseases, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Respir Med. 1998 Feb;92(2):308-15
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma, Exercise-Induced - diagnosis
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
Child
Cold - adverse effects
Diagnosis, Differential
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - diagnosis - physiopathology
Male
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Predictive value of tests
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Cold air inhalation and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) have both been used as measures of bronchial responsiveness. Both stimuli are often combined in the Nordic climate. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the climatic influence of cold temperatures upon exercise-induced asthma. The secondary aims were: (a) to assess metacholine bronchial hyper-responsiveness and EIB in children with bronchial asthma (n = 32; mean age 10.8 years) compared to children with other chronic lung diseases (CLD) (n = 26, mean age 10.1 years); and (b) to assess the influence of cold air inhalation upon EIB in the two groups of children. Methods used were: (a) the metacholine concentration causing a reduction in FEV1 of 20% (PC20-M), (b) maximum FEV1 fall (delta FEV1) after submaximal treadmill run (EIB test); and (c) delta FEV1 after submaximal treadmill run while inhaling cold (-20 degrees C) dry air (CA-EIB test). Geometric mean PC20-M did not differ significantly between the asthma children (1.28 mg ml-1) and the CLD children (2.90 mg ml-1). In the asthma children, mean delta FEV1 after EIB test was 12.8% vs 21.8% after adding cold air (P
PubMed ID
9616531 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diagnosing asthma in children: what is the role for methacholine bronchoprovocation testing?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157935
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2008 May;43(5):481-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Joel J Liem
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Donald W Cockroft
Allan B Becker
Author Affiliation
Section of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Manitoba Institute of Child Health, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2008 May;43(5):481-9
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Area Under Curve
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests - methods - statistics & numerical data
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Predictive value of tests
ROC Curve
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Factors
Skin Tests
Abstract
To determine whether measurement of airways responsiveness to methacholine can help physicians diagnose asthma in children.
Children from the 1995 Manitoba birth cohort were assessed by asthma specialists, had skin testing and measurement of airways responsiveness to methacholine (PC20). We selected children with doctor-diagnosed asthma and healthy children as controls (no asthma, no allergic rhinitis, negative skin tests). Sensitivities and specificities for asthma were calculated. Receiver operating curves were calculated to determine the best fit of the methacholine challenge as a diagnostic test.
640 children were assessed. Two hundred fifteen children with doctor diagnosed asthma and 197 healthy controls successfully completed a methacholine challenge. Airways hyperresponsiveness was a moderately sensitive and specific measure for the diagnosis of asthma in girls, whether atopic (sensitivity of 71% and specificity of 69% at PC20
PubMed ID
18383334 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exhaled and nasal NO levels in allergic rhinitis: relation to sensitization, pollen season and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15681
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 Feb;13(2):301-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
A H Henriksen
M. Sue-Chu
T L Holmen
A. Langhammer
L. Bjermer
Author Affiliation
Dept of Lung Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 Feb;13(2):301-6
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allergens
Breath Tests
Bronchial Hyperreactivity
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Norway
Pollen
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - diagnosis - metabolism - physiopathology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - diagnosis - metabolism - physiopathology
Seasons
Spirometry
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Exhaled nitric oxide is a potential marker of lower airway inflammation. Allergic rhinitis is associated with asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. To determine whether or not nasal and exhaled NO concentrations are increased in allergic rhinitis and to assess the relation between hyperresponsiveness and exhaled NO, 46 rhinitic and 12 control subjects, all nonasthmatic nonsmokers without upper respiratory tract infection, were randomly selected from a large-scale epidemiological survey in Central Norway. All were investigated with flow-volume spirometry, methacholine provocation test, allergy testing and measurement of nasal and exhaled NO concentration in the nonpollen season. Eighteen rhinitic subjects completed an identical follow-up investigation during the following pollen season. Exhaled NO was significantly elevated in allergic rhinitis in the nonpollen season, especially in perennially sensitized subjects, as compared with controls (p=0.01), and increased further in the pollen season (p=0.04), mainly due to a two-fold increase in those with seasonal sensitization. Nasal NO was not significantly different from controls in the nonpollen season and did not increase significantly in the pollen season. Exhaled NO was increased in hyperresponsive subjects, and decreased significantly after methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction, suggesting that NO production occurs in the peripheral airways. In allergic rhinitis, an increase in exhaled nitric oxide on allergen exposure, particularly in hyperresponsive subjects, may be suggestive of airway inflammation and an increased risk for developing asthma.
PubMed ID
10065672 View in PubMed
Less detail

Extended diagnostic criteria used for indirect challenge testing in elite asthmatic swimmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130089
Source
Respir Med. 2012 Jan;106(1):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Kerstin Romberg
Ellen Tufvesson
Leif Bjermer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Respir Med. 2012 Jan;106(1):15-24
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma, Exercise-Induced - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Bronchial Provocation Tests - methods
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
Exercise Test - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Mannitol - diagnostic use
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Questionnaires
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Swimming
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of asthma with or without exercise induced symptoms among elite and elite aspiring swimmers and to compare sport specific exercise provocation with mannitol provocation.
101 adolescent swimmers were investigated with mannitol provocation and sport specific exercise challenge test. Mannitol positivity was defined as either direct FEV(1) PD15 (ordinary criteria) or as ß(2)-reversibility =15% after challenge (extended criteria). A direct positive exercise test was defined as a drop in FEV(1) of 10% (ordinary criteria) or a difference in FEV of =15% either spontaneous, variability, or with ß2-agonist, reversibility (extended criteria).
We found a high prevalence of mannitol and/or exercise positivity. Twenty-six swimmers were mannitol direct positive and 14 were direct exercise positive using ordinary criteria. Using extended criteria 43 were mannitol positive and 24 were exercise positive. When including reversibility and variability to define a positive test the sensitivity for current asthma with or without exercise induced symptoms increased while the specificity remained roughly unchanged. Direct positivity for mannitol and exercise poorly overlapped using ordinary criteria but improved using extended criteria.
We found a high prevalence of asthma among elite swimmers. The use of variability and reversibility (liability) as additional criteria to define a positive test provided to our mind relevant information and should be considered.
PubMed ID
22035852 View in PubMed
Less detail

Increased bronchial responsiveness in workers sawing Scots pine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15861
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1996 Mar;153(3):948-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
P O Malmberg
A. Rask-Andersen
K A Larsson
N. Stjernberg
B M Sundblad
K. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Solna, Sweden.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1996 Mar;153(3):948-52
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allergens
Antibodies, Fungal - blood
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - physiopathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
Comparative Study
Dust - adverse effects
Forced expiratory volume
Fungi
Humans
Lignans
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Maximal Expiratory Flow Rate
Maximal Midexpiratory Flow Rate
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Middle Aged
Naphthols
Occupational Diseases - physiopathology
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - physiopathology
Spirometry
Spores
Sweden
Trees
Vital Capacity
Abstract
The purpose of the present investigation was to study bronchial responsiveness and pulmonary function in Swedish sawmill workers, who are not exposed to plicatic acid, the sensitizer in red wood cedar asthma. Bronchial responsiveness, transfer factor, spirometry, and precipitating antibodies in serum against sawmill fungi were measured in 164 workers at five sawmills. The results from workers inside the sawing area (sawyers, n=59), in the trimming department (trimmers, n=66), and from other workers in the sawmill (sawyer-referents, n=39) were compared. Sawyers had higher bronchial responsiveness than referents. In 55% of the sawyers FEV1 decreased by 20% or more within the highest dose of methacholine compared with 31% of sawyer-referents and 41% of trimmers (p
PubMed ID
8630578 View in PubMed
Less detail

Increased prevalence of sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness in subjects with bronchial asthma: a population study of young adults in three European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15829
Source
Eur Respir J. 1996 Oct;9(10):2132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
C. Janson
W. De Backer
T. Gislason
P. Plaschke
E. Björnsson
J. Hetta
H. Kristbjarnarson
P. Vermeire
G. Boman
Author Affiliation
Dept of Lung Medicine, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1996 Oct;9(10):2132-8
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology
Belgium - epidemiology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - epidemiology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
Comparative Study
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
European Union
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Interviews
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate - physiology
Population
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Skin Tests
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Sleep Stages
Snoring - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Wakefulness - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate whether asthma is associated with decreased quality of sleep and increased daytime sleepiness. The study involved a random population of 2,202 subjects supplemented by 459 subjects with suspected asthma, aged 20-45 yrs. The subjects were from Reykjavik (Iceland), Uppsala and Göteborg (Sweden) and Antwerp (Belgium), and participated in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. The investigation included a structured interview, methacholine challenge, skinprick tests and a questionnaire on sleep disturbances. Participants in Iceland and Sweden also estimated their sleep times and made peak expiratory flow (PEF) recordings during a period of 1 week. Asthma was defined as self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma with current asthma-related symptoms (n = 267). Difficulties inducing sleep (DIS) and early morning awakenings (EMA) were about twice as common, and daytime sleepiness 50% more common, in asthmatics compared with subjects without asthma. After adjusting for possible confounders, a positive association was found between asthma and: DIS (odds ratio (OR) = 1.8); EMA (OR = 2.0); daytime sleepiness (OR = 1.6); snoring (OR = 1.7); and self reported apnoeas (OR = 3.7). Allergic rhinitis, which was reported by 71% of subjects with asthma, was independently related to DIS (OR = 2.0) and daytime sleepiness (OR = 1.3). A significant correlation was found between the number of asthma-related symptoms and sleep disturbances (p
PubMed ID
8902479 View in PubMed
Less detail

In search of childhood asthma: questionnaire, tests of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and clinical evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15412
Source
Thorax. 2002 Feb;57(2):120-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
S T Remes
J. Pekkanen
K. Remes
R O Salonen
M. Korppi
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Sami.Remes@kuh.fi
Source
Thorax. 2002 Feb;57(2):120-6
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - diagnosis
Bronchial Provocation Tests - standards
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
Child
Diagnosis, Differential
Exercise Test - standards
Humans
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Spirometry - standards
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The definition or diagnosis of asthma is a challenge for both clinicians and epidemiologists. Symptom history is usually supplemented with tests of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) in spite of their uncertainty in improving diagnostic accuracy. METHODS: To assess the interrelationship between respiratory symptoms, BHR, and clinical diagnosis of asthma, the respiratory symptoms of 1633 schoolchildren were screened using a questionnaire (response rate 81.2%) and a clinical study was conducted in a subsample of 247 children. Data from a free running test and a methacholine inhalation challenge test were available in 218 children. The diagnosis of asthma was confirmed by a paediatric allergist. RESULTS: Despite their high specificity (>0.97), BHR tests did not significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy after the symptom history: area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.90 for a logistic regression model with four symptoms and 0.94 for the symptoms with free running test and methacholine inhalation challenge results. On the other hand, BHR tests had low sensitivity (0.35-0.47), whereas several symptoms had both high specificity (>0.97) and sensitivity (>0.7) in relation to clinical asthma, which makes them a better tool for asthma epidemiology than BHR. CONCLUSIONS: Symptom history still forms the basis for defining asthma in both clinical and epidemiological settings. BHR tests only marginally increased the diagnostic accuracy after symptom history had been taken into account. The diagnosis of childhood asthma should not therefore be overlooked in symptomatic cases with no objective evidence of BHR. Moreover, BHR should not be required for defining asthma in epidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
11828040 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sensitivity of peak expiratory flow rate for diagnosing bronchial obstruction on methacholine inhalation challenge in school-aged asthmatic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15722
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1998 Jun;87(6):635-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
O. Linna
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1998 Jun;87(6):635-7
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Airway Obstruction - diagnosis
Asthma - diagnosis
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Sensitivity and specificity
Spirometry - methods
Abstract
To study whether forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) for the diagnosis of bronchial reactivity by means of the methacholine inhalation challenge test could be appropriately replaced by simple measurements of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), 75 consecutively referred asthmatic children aged 6-15 y were examined during a symptom-free period. Their baseline FEV1 and PEFR values ranged from 70 to 130% (mean 99.1) and from 77 to 122% (mean 101.4) of those predicted, respectively. The methacholine inhalation challenge was performed with stepwise doubled cumulative doses and both FEV and PEFR were measured at each step. Of the 67 children who had a 20% reduction in either test, the fall in FEV was achieved after a lower dose of methacholine than the 20% fall in PEFR in 49 cases, after a higher dose in 15 and after the same dose in 3. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.56, p
PubMed ID
9686655 View in PubMed
Less detail

Smoking and atopy as determinants of sputum eosinophilia and bronchial hyper-responsiveness in adults with normal lung function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184038
Source
Respir Med. 2003 Aug;97(8):947-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
T. Petäys
L. von Hertzen
T. Metso
P. Rytilä
P. Jousilahti
I. Helenius
E. Vartiainen
T. Haahtela
Author Affiliation
Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Meilahdentie 2, 000250 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Respir Med. 2003 Aug;97(8):947-54
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bronchi - drug effects
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchoconstriction
Bronchoconstrictor Agents - diagnostic use
Eosinophilia - etiology - pathology - physiopathology
Eosinophils
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Male
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Middle Aged
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - pathology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - pathology - physiopathology
Sputum - cytology
Abstract
Data concerning the determinants of sputum eosinophilia and bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) in large cohorts of individuals with normal lung function are limited. Here, we assessed the occurrence of sputum eosinophilia and BHR and identified the risk factors for these variables in two populations living in North Karelia, Finland, and in Pitkäranta, the Republic of Karelia, Russia. These areas are geographically adjacent, but differ, however, fundamentally in major cultural, socioeconomical and lifestyle aspects. The study population comprised 790 Finns and 387 Russian, aged 25-54 years, who were randomly enrolled from the population registers. A methacholine challenge test to measure BHR was successfully performed in 581 (74%) Finns and 307 (79%) Russians with virtually normal lung function (FEV1 > 70% of predicted). Of these, induced sputum samples were obtained from 41% of the Finns and from 67% of the Russians. The proportion of current smokers was 27% among the former and 42% among the latter. Sputum eosinophilia was assessed using a semi-quantitative method, and total concentrations of sputum eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured using an immunoassay. Risk factors for BHR and sputum eosinophilia were identified with a regression analysis. The prevalence of sputum eosinophilia was 22% among the Finns and 19% among the Russians, and the respective figures for BHR were 14% and 13%. The median ECP concentration in sputum was significantly higher among the Russians as compared with the Finns (P
PubMed ID
12924523 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.