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1478 records – page 1 of 148.

40-year trends in skin cancer in British Columbia, Canada, 1973 to 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125127
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
David I McLean
Norm Phillips
Youwen Zhou
Richard Gallagher
Tim K Lee
Author Affiliation
Prevention Programs and Cancer Control Research, BC Cancer Agency, BC. david.mclean@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Skin cancer is common in North America. Incidence rate trends are potentially important in the assessment of the effects of measures to increase sun awareness in the population as well as measures to reduce sun damage.
To determine the incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) in a geographically defined Canadian population over a 40-year period.
Data were obtained from the BC Cancer Registry for the calendar years 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003.
Age-standardized incidence rates increased significantly from 1973 to 2003 for BCC, SCC, and CMM.
The ethnic makeup of British Columbia has changed over time, and a novel method of accounting for the effect of this on skin cancer rates is presented.
The incidence rate for skin cancers continued to rise in British Columbia, but there appears to have been a decline in the incidence of CMM and BCC in the youngest cohorts.
PubMed ID
22513059 View in PubMed
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Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(2):161-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
E M Illing
L A Gaudette
J. McLaughlin
M. McBride
Author Affiliation
Health Status Section, Canadian Centre for Health Information, Statistics Canada.
Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(2):161-74
Date
1992
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Survival Rate
Abstract
In Canada, it is estimated that in 1992 115,000 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed. This total excludes 47,200 estimated new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer. The number of new cases is increasing by about 3,000 per year due partly to the aging population, improved registration, earlier detection of cancer and real increases in the incidence of some types of cancer. It is estimated that there will be 58,300 cancer deaths in 1992. By 1992, prostate cancer will have overtaken lung cancer as the leading cancer among men in the four western provinces while lung cancer is expected to exceed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer deaths among women in some provinces, notably British Columbia. In British Columbia, the relative survival rates for most cancers improved between the periods 1970 to 1974 and 1980 to 1984. However, stomach, lung and pancreatic cancers, which have low survival rates, showed little improvement. This article is based on 1992 estimates of cancer incidence and mortality, cancer trends in Canada and relative cancer survival rates in British Columbia, found in Canadian Cancer Statistics 1992. This publication was prepared at Statistics Canada through a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Cancer Society, Health and Welfare Canada and the provincial/territorial cancer registries.
PubMed ID
1421019 View in PubMed
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The 2005 British Columbia Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign and short-term changes in smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164149
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynda Gagné
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration at University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. lgagne@uvic.ca
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Public Health Administration - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Marketing
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the 2005 British Columbia Ministry of Health Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign on short-term smoking behavior.
National cross-sectional data are used with a quasi-experimental approach to test the impact of the campaign.
Findings indicate that prevalence and average number of cigarettes smoked per day deviated upward from trend for the rest of Canada (P = .08; P = .01) but not for British Columbia. They also indicate that British Columbia smokers in lower risk groups reduced their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend (-2.23; P = .10), whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did not, and that British Columbia smokers in high-risk groups did not increase their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend, whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did (2.97; P = .01).
The overall poorer performance of high-risk groups is attributed to high exposure to cigarette smoking, which reduces a smoker's chances of successful cessation. In particular, high-risk groups are by definition more likely to be exposed to smoking by peers, but are also less likely to work in workplaces with smoking bans, which are shown to have a substantial impact on prevalence. Results suggest that for mass media campaigns to be more effective with high-risk groups, they need to be combined with other incentives, and that more prolonged interventions should be considered.
PubMed ID
17435497 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal community-centered injury surveillance: a community-based participatory process evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129138
Source
Prev Sci. 2012 Apr;13(2):107-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Mariana Brussoni
Lise L Olsen
Pamela Joshi
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, BC Injury Research & Prevention Unit, L408 - 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4, Canada. mbrussoni@cw.bc.ca
Source
Prev Sci. 2012 Apr;13(2):107-17
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups
Focus Groups
Humans
Leadership
Population Surveillance
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
While injuries are a leading health concern for Aboriginal populations, injury rates and types vary substantially across bands. The uniqueness of Aboriginal communities highlights the importance of collecting community-level injury surveillance data to assist with identifying local injury patterns, setting priorities for action and evaluating programs. Secwepemc First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada, implemented the Injury Surveillance Project using the Aboriginal Community-Centered Injury Surveillance System. This paper presents findings from a community-based participatory process evaluation of the Injury Surveillance Project. Qualitative data collection methods were informed by OCAP (Ownership, Control, Access, and Possession) principles and included focus groups, interviews and document review. Results focused on lessons learned through the planning, implementation and management of the Injury Surveillance Project identifying lessons related to: project leadership and staff, training, project funding, initial project outcomes, and community readiness. Key findings included the central importance of a community-based and paced approach guided by OCAP principles, the key role of leadership and project champions, and the strongly collaborative relationships between the project communities. Findings may assist with successful implementation of community-based health surveillance in other settings and with other health issues and illustrate another path to self-determination for Aboriginal communities. The evaluation methods represent an example of a collaborative community-driven approach guided by OCAP principles necessary for work with Aboriginal communities.
Notes
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Cites: J Agric Saf Health. 2009 Jan;15(1):19-3519266882
PubMed ID
22138890 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal suicide in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210445
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1996 Dec;83(3 Pt 2):1202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
D. Lester
Author Affiliation
Psychology Program, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona 08240-0195, USA.
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1996 Dec;83(3 Pt 2):1202
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Risk factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
9017732 View in PubMed
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Access to medical and supportive care for rural and remote cancer survivors in northern British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273959
Source
J Rural Health. 2014;30(3):311-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A. Fuchsia Howard
Kirsten Smillie
Kristin Turnbull
Chelan Zirul
Dana Munroe
Amanda Ward
Pam Tobin
Arminee Kazanjian
Rob Olson
Source
J Rural Health. 2014;30(3):311-21
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - therapy
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Survivors
Abstract
Rural cancer survivors (RCS) potentially have unique medical and supportive care experiences when they return to their communities posttreatment because of the availability and accessibility of health services. However, there is a limited understanding of cancer survivorship in rural communities.
The purpose of this study is to describe RCS experiences accessing medical and supportive care postcancer treatment.
Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 52 RCS residing in northern British Columbia, Canada. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis methods.
General Population RCS and First Nations RCS experienced challenges accessing timely medical care close to home, resulting in unmet medical needs. Emotional support services were rarely available, and, if they did exist, were difficult to access or not tailored to cancer survivors. Travel and distance were barriers to medical and psychological support and services, not only in terms of the cost of travel, but also the toll this took on family members. Many of the RCS lacked access to trusted and useful information. Financial assistance, for follow-up care and rehabilitation services, was rarely available, as was appropriate employment assistance.
Medical and supportive care can be inaccessible, unavailable, and unaffordable for cancer survivors living in rural northern communities.
PubMed ID
24483272 View in PubMed
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Accumulated state of the Yukon River watershed: part I critical review of literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121234
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Monique G Dubé
Breda Muldoon
Julie Wilson
Karonhiakta'tie Bryan Maracle
Author Affiliation
Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Alberta, Canada. Dub.mon@hotmail.com
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animal Migration
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Climate change
Environment
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Fishes - physiology
Fresh Water - analysis - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Seasons
Water Movements
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Water Quality
Yukon Territory - epidemiology
Abstract
A consistent methodology for assessing the accumulating effects of natural and manmade change on riverine systems has not been developed for a whole host of reasons including a lack of data, disagreement over core elements to consider, and complexity. Accumulated state assessments of aquatic systems is an integral component of watershed cumulative effects assessment. The Yukon River is the largest free flowing river in the world and is the fourth largest drainage basin in North America, draining 855,000 km(2) in Canada and the United States. Because of its remote location, it is considered pristine but little is known about its cumulative state. This review identified 7 "hot spot" areas in the Yukon River Basin including Lake Laberge, Yukon River at Dawson City, the Charley and Yukon River confluence, Porcupine and Yukon River confluence, Yukon River at the Dalton Highway Bridge, Tolovana River near Tolovana, and Tanana River at Fairbanks. Climate change, natural stressors, and anthropogenic stresses have resulted in accumulating changes including measurable levels of contaminants in surface waters and fish tissues, fish and human disease, changes in surface hydrology, as well as shifts in biogeochemical loads. This article is the first integrated accumulated state assessment for the Yukon River basin based on a literature review. It is the first part of a 2-part series. The second article (Dubé et al. 2013a, this issue) is a quantitative accumulated state assessment of the Yukon River Basin where hot spots and hot moments are assessed outside of a "normal" range of variability.
PubMed ID
22927161 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of a provincial prescription database for assessing medication adherence in heart failure patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158598
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2008 Mar;42(3):361-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Karen Dahri
Stephen J Shalansky
Linda Jang
Leon Jung
Andrew P Ignaszewski
Catherine Clark
Author Affiliation
CSU Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Karen.Dahri@vch.ca
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2008 Mar;42(3):361-7
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Databases, Factual - standards
Drug Monitoring - standards
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Heart Failure - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
British Columbia's central prescription database, PharmaNet, is often used for both clinical and research applications. However, PharmaNet details prescription transactions, not actual medication consumption, resulting in many potential sources of inaccuracy when the information is assumed to reflect population or individual drug utilization.
To assess the accuracy of PharmaNet for adherence assessment in patients with heart failure who are taking beta-blockers.
A 6-month prospective, longitudinal assessment of adherence to the prescribed beta-blocker regimen was carried out using both PharmaNet data and the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) for each patient enrolled. The limit of agreement between the 2 adherence assessment methods was assessed using the Bland-Altman approach.
Fifteen of 58 patients initially enrolled in the study were excluded, most due to misuse of MEMS or failure to return the MEMS vial despite thorough follow-up. For the 43 patients included in the final analysis, mean +/- SD adherence was 97.8 +/- 11.8% when assessed by PharmaNet and 97.1 +/- 7.3% when MEMS was used. However, the limit of agreement, reported as the mean of the differences +/- 2SD, was 6.8 +/- 18.5%, indicating a moderate-to-high level of agreement between the 2 methods when the confidence interval is taken into consideration.
These results suggest that PharmaNet data accurately reflect medication adherence for most patients. The MEMS system proved unreliable in several cases, illustrating the difficulty of identifying a gold standard for adherence assessment.
PubMed ID
18303147 View in PubMed
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Acquired ocular visual impairment in children. 1960-1989.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221590
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Mar;147(3):325-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
G C Robinson
J E Jan
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Mar;147(3):325-8
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Vision Disorders - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Vision Screening
Abstract
To describe the causes, sites, and types of eye anomaly and associated handicaps in children identified in the last 30 years with ocular visual impairment of 20/200 (6/60) or worse in the better eye with correction.
Trend study.
Children in British Columbia younger than 19 years with visual loss diagnosed between January 1960 and December 1989 who were referred for multidisciplinary assessment.
The incidence of acquired ocular visual impairment has decreased from 0.6 to less than 0.2 per 10,000 people aged 19 years or younger during the last 30 years. The most common cause was a genetic cause, followed by tumor, injury, infection and autoimmune disorders. Optic nerve atrophy and retinal disorders together resulted in more than 90% of all ocular lesions. Gender distribution revealed more males than females to be affected. Sixty-six percent of children had enough sight to read. The percentage of affected children with neurologic disabilities has increased overall in the last 30 years because more children with profound brain damage have survived.
Acquired ocular visual impairment is rare. The incidence of such impairment has been reduced by two thirds in the last 30 years. This decline has had little impact, however, because most cases of blindness are due to congenital conditions. The number of cases of acquired blindness is only one fourth that of congenital blindness, which has begun to increase again owing to the reemergence of retinopathy of prematurity.
PubMed ID
8438820 View in PubMed
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1478 records – page 1 of 148.