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Access to care for seniors -- dental concerns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192958
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Oct;67(9):504-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
M F Marvin
Author Affiliation
Geriatric Dental Program for the North Bay and District Dental Society.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Oct;67(9):504-6
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Canada
Dental Care for Aged - economics - psychology - utilization
Financing, Government
Health Education, Dental
Health Services Accessibility
Health Transition
Humans
Ontario
Societies, Dental
PubMed ID
11597341 View in PubMed
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Access to primary care from the perspective of Aboriginal patients at an urban emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139323
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Mar;21(3):333-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Annette J Browne
Victoria L Smye
Patricia Rodney
Sannie Y Tang
Bill Mussell
John O'Neil
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. annette.browne@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Mar;21(3):333-48
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
British Columbia
Canada
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Triage
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In this article, we discuss findings from an ethnographic study in which we explored experiences of access to primary care services from the perspective of Aboriginal people seeking care at an emergency department (ED) located in a large Canadian city. Data were collected over 20 months of immersion in the ED, and included participant observation and in-depth interviews with 44 patients triaged as stable and nonurgent, most of whom were living in poverty and residing in the inner city. Three themes in the findings are discussed: (a) anticipating providers' assumptions; (b) seeking help for chronic pain; and (c) use of the ED as a reflection of social suffering. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the role of the ED as well as the broader primary care sector in responding to the needs of patients affected by poverty, racialization, and other forms of disadvantage.
PubMed ID
21075979 View in PubMed
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Air ambulance transports to Port McNeill, British Columbia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101154
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 1999 Winter;4(1):21-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Winter-1999
  1 website  
Author
Moffat, S
Taylor, RA
Thommasen, HV
Author Affiliation
Port McNeill Medical Clinic, Port McNeill, BC
Bella Coola General Hospital, Bella Coola, BC
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 1999 Winter;4(1):21-26
Date
Winter-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air ambulance service
Air evaculation
British Columbia
Canada
Emergency air medical evaluation
Isolated communities
Medical transport
Overtriage
Patient outcome
Patient transport
Prehospital setting
Transfers
Vancouver Island
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine overtriage rates (where air ambulance transport could have been avoided without compromising patient care) by reviewing the records of air ambulance transports from isolated coastal communities to the small rural hospital in Port McNeill, British Columbia, a remote coastal community on Vancouver Island. The category of patient being transported to this hospital by the air ambulance service was also examined.DESIGN: A 1-year chart review from Apr. 1, 1996, to Mar. 31, 1997.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographics of the study group, site of origin of each air ambulance transfer, whether the liaison was a community health representative (CHR) or a registered nurse, and the final diagnosis by the receiving physician were all determined. In addition, subsequent management and patient outcome were also noted. After reviewing all of this information, a subjective decision was made as to whether the air ambulance transport was necessary or not.RESULTS: Forty-eight separate air ambulance transfers were carried out, all by helicopter, transporting a total of 51 patients (43 adults, 8 children). Forty-eight percent of evacuations originated from 2 communities off Vancouver Island. The overtriage rate was calculated at 22%. The area of minor trauma was particularly prone to overuse of the air ambulance.CONCLUSIONS: Just over 20% of emergency air ambulance transfers to Port McNeill Hospital probably were not necessary. This overtriage rate is consistent with that reported for air ambulance transports that take place between primary care hospitals and secondary or tertiary care hospitals.
Online Resources
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Source
CMAJ. 1993 Nov 15;149(10):1379
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1993
Author
B L Beattie
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Nov 15;149(10):1379
Date
Nov-15-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care
British Columbia
Canada
Geriatrics - education
Humans
Internship and Residency - methods
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1993 Jun 15;148(12):2143-78324688
PubMed ID
8221418 View in PubMed
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Analyzing the state of community health nursing: advancing from deficit to strengths-based practice using appreciative inquiry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159544
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2008 Jan-Mar;31(1):28-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Candace Lind
Dawn Smith
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4. cylind@ucalgary.ca
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2008 Jan-Mar;31(1):28-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
British Columbia
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education - methods - organization & administration
Community-Based Participatory Research
Health Policy
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Philosophy, Nursing
School Health Services - organization & administration
Social Justice
Abstract
In this article we critically analyze the disconnect between much of the contemporary discourse and practice in Canadian community health nursing (CHN) that has contributed to the slow progress of strengths-based, health-promoting nursing practice. Appreciative inquiry philosophy and methods are introduced as a bridge to traverse this disciplinary gap. Two exemplars show how appreciative, strengths-based CHN research and action can move policies and programs toward more socially just practices congruent with CHN values. Exciting potential for nursing knowledge may arise from incorporating more strengths-based approaches into practice, education, policy, and research.
PubMed ID
20531267 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric measurements and physical examinations of Indian populations from British Columbia and the Yukon Territories, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41834
Source
Hum Biol. 1977 Dec;49(4):581-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1977

Appraisal of the epidemiology of fetal alcohol syndrome among Canadian native peoples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231633
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Jan-Feb;80(1):42-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
D L Bray
P D Anderson
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Jan-Feb;80(1):42-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Canada
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - epidemiology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Abstract
Three recent studies suggest that Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is more prevalent among Canadian Native children than non-Native children. The evidence does not appear to be conclusive. However, the Canadian research that is reviewed is important in defining areas which require further investigation. Efforts at research and intervention should be directed towards defining and modifying personal and social risk factors. Our review of current research on FAS and Native peoples suggests that it is important to consider pragmatic questions which can best contribute to the goal of preventing possible alcohol effects on the fetus.
PubMed ID
2702544 View in PubMed
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Auditing antibiotic use in a teaching hospital: focus on cefoxitin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241959
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 May 1;128(9):1075-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1983
Author
P J Jewesson
R. Ho
Q. Jang
G. Watts
A W Chow
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 May 1;128(9):1075-8
Date
May-1-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
British Columbia
Canada
Cefoxitin - administration & dosage
Drug Utilization
Health services
Health Services Misuse
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Medical Audit
Medication Systems, Hospital
Abstract
The prevalence and nature of antibiotic misuse in a major teaching hospital was assessed by means of a quality-of-use audit. Cefoxitin was chosen for study. The use of cefoxitin increased rapidly during the study period, accounting for 17.7% ($15300) of the pharmacy's costs for cephalosporins during the first year of its availability but 47.7% ($60707) during the second year. Cefoxitin was inappropriately used for 43% of the patients receiving it during the first 2-month audit period and for 25% of those receiving it during the second audit period, 1 year later (p less than 0.01 by chi-square analysis).
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1970 Jul 13;213(2):264-75467892
Cites: Am J Hosp Pharm. 1972 Oct;29(10):828-345075122
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1973 Oct;79(4):555-604795880
Cites: JAMA. 1974 Mar 4;227(9):1023-84405926
Cites: Hospitals. 1974 Apr 16;48(8):73-64820315
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1974 Aug;130(2):165-84842338
Cites: Am J Hosp Pharm. 1976 Sep;33(9):918-241086598
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1977 Feb 5;116(3):256-9837302
Cites: Hospitals. 1977 Oct 1;51(19):81-2, 84-5903104
Cites: JAMA. 1977 Nov 14;238(20):2170-2578830
Cites: Am J Hosp Pharm. 1978 Dec;35(12):1521-3717407
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1978 Nov;89(5 Pt 1):650-6362999
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1979 Jun;139(6):698-706109551
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1979 Aug 16;301(7):351-5460323
Cites: Am J Hosp Pharm. 1979 Aug;36(8):1055-8484564
Cites: West J Med. 1979 Jun;130(6):498-502516689
Cites: Drug Intell Clin Pharm. 1980 Apr;14(4):272-710309192
Cites: Drug Intell Clin Pharm. 1981 Jul-Aug;15(7-8):594-77249934
Cites: Rev Infect Dis. 1981 Jul-Aug;3(4):745-537339788
PubMed ID
6839256 View in PubMed
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191 records – page 1 of 20.