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3-year results of a collaborative school-based oral health program in a remote First Nations community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157485
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Publication Type
Article
Author
A J Macnab
J. Rozmus
D. Benton
F A Gagnon
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Department of Pediatrics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care for Children - methods
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Medically underserved area
Oral Hygiene - education - methods
School Health Services
Tooth Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Surveys of dental health among Aboriginal children in Canada, using scales such as the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score, indicate that Aboriginal children have 2 to 3 times poorer oral health compared with other populations. A remote First Nations community approached requested assistance in addressing the health of their children. The objective was to work with the community to improve oral health and knowledge among school children. The hypothesis formulated was that after 3 years of the program there would be a significant decrease in dmft/DMFT (primary/permanent) score.
This was a cross-sectional study of all school-aged children in a small, remote First Nations community. Pre- and post- intervention evaluation of oral health was conducted by a dentist not involved in the study. The intervention consisted of a school-based program with daily brush-ins, fluoride application, educational presentations, and a recognition/incentive scheme.
Twenty-six children were assessed prior to the intervention, representing 45% of the 58 children then in the community. All 40 children in the community were assessed following the intervention. Prior to the intervention, 8% of children were cavity free. Following 3 years of the intervention, 32% were cavity free. Among the 13 children assessed both pre- and post-intervention, dmft/DMFT score improved significantly (p
PubMed ID
18444770 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up of older adults residing in long-term care facilities: utilisation of a comprehensive dental programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149106
Source
Gerodontology. 2009 Dec;26(4):282-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Chris C L Wyatt
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. cwyatt@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Gerodontology. 2009 Dec;26(4):282-90
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Comprehensive Dental Care - organization & administration - utilization
Dental Care for Aged - organization & administration - utilization
Dental Caries - diagnosis - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Periodontal Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study will compare the clinical outcomes of 139 elders residing in long-term care (LTC) who received dental treatment with those who did not receive care under a comprehensive dental programme over 5 years.
Numerous studies have documented very poor oral health and limited access to dental care among frail older adults residing in LTC facilities. The University of British Columbia and Providence Healthcare developed a comprehensive dental programme to serve elderly LTC residents within seven Vancouver hospitals. Since 2002, the Geriatric Dentistry Programme has provided annual oral health assessments and access to comprehensive dental care.
A comprehensive oral health assessment was provided using CODE (an index of Clinical Oral Disorders in Elders). A change in oral health status (improvement or worsening) was evaluated by measuring CODE scores including caries and periodontal condition, and other aspects of the dentition.
Eighty-three residents received dental treatment of some form over the 5 years, while 56 did not receive any treatment beyond an annual examination. The percentage of residents initially recommended for treatment in 2002 was 97%, which declined to 70-73% after the 3rd year. The percentage of residents treated increased after the first year and remained at 56-72% thereafter. The comparison between CODE scores from baseline and 5 years later showed an improvement for those receiving care (p = 0.02, chi(2) = 7.9, df = 2).
Within the limitations of this study, residents who did consent and receive care showed an improvement in their oral health status after 5 years.
PubMed ID
19682096 View in PubMed
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20th annual Frank Costenbader Lecture--adult strabismus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213945
Source
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 1995 Nov-Dec;32(6):348-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
W E Scott
P J Kutschke
W R Lee
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, USA.
Source
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 1995 Nov-Dec;32(6):348-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Awards and Prizes
British Columbia
Child
Diplopia - physiopathology
Humans
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Strabismus - physiopathology - surgery
Vision, Binocular
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
A retrospective analysis of adults with strabismus was done to examine the potential risks and the possible benefits of surgical treatment and to describe the types of adult strabismus.
Eight hundred ninety-two patients were analyzed. Age at time of surgery ranged from 9 years to 89 years. The average follow up was 34 months. Major types of strabismus were grouped by their original diagnoses. The group of patients with horizontal strabismus, which usually had an onset before 9, was termed the before visual maturity (BVM) group. The group of patients with paretic or restrictive strabismus usually had the onset of strabismus after age 9 and was termed the after visual maturity (AVM) group.
Patients with adult strabismus can gain restoration of alignment, as well as binocular function. At the last postoperative visit, 74% of the BVM group were aligned within 15 prism diopters. Not only was restoration of alignment accomplished, many of them gained some degree of sensory fusion as measured by the Worth 4-Dot (W4D) or Titmus stereoacuity. Twenty-nine percent of patients with congenital esotropia had some sensory fusion. The other subtypes in the BVM group had even higher percentages of patients with postoperative stereoacuity. In the AVM group, 92% had fusion at the last postoperative visit.
The outcomes of adult strabismics in our study show that certain benefits can be gained from correction of ocular alignment. Restoration of alignment, elimination of diplopia and sensory fusion are functional benefits that can be obtained through strabismus surgery in the adult patient. It is clear that adult strabismus is more than just a cosmetic problem and treatment is worthwhile.
PubMed ID
8587016 View in PubMed
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The 24-hour urine collection: gold standard or historical practice?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155561
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Anne-Marie Côté
Tabassum Firoz
André Mattman
Elaine M Lam
Peter von Dadelszen
Laura A Magee
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ, Canada.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Dec;199(6):625.e1-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - urine
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - urine
Female
Gynecology - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - urine
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis - urine
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care - standards
Reference Standards
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Urinalysis - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of the study was to determine completeness of 24-hour urine collection in pregnancy.
This was a retrospective laboratory/chart review of 24-hour urine collections at British Columbia Women's Hospital. Completeness was assessed by 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion (UcreatV): expected according to maternal weight for single collections and between-measurement difference for serial collections.
For 198 randomly selected pregnant women with a hypertensive disorder (63% preeclampsia), 24-hour urine collections were frequently inaccurate (13-54%) on the basis of UcreatV of 97-220 micromol/kg per day (11.0-25.0 mg/kg per day) or 133-177 micromol/kg per day (15.1-20.1 mg/kg per day) of prepregnancy weight (respectively). Lean body weight resulted in more inaccurate collections (24-68%). The current weight was frequently unavailable (28%) and thus not used. For 161 women (81% proteinuric) with serial 24-hour urine levels, a median [interquartile range] of 11 [5-31] days apart, between-measurement difference in UcreatV was 14.4% [6.0-24.9]; 40 women (24.8%) had values 25% or greater, exceeding analytic and biologic variation.
Twenty-four hour urine collection is frequently inaccurate and not a precise measure of proteinuria or creatinine clearance.
PubMed ID
18718568 View in PubMed
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40-year trends in skin cancer in British Columbia, Canada, 1973 to 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125127
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
David I McLean
Norm Phillips
Youwen Zhou
Richard Gallagher
Tim K Lee
Author Affiliation
Prevention Programs and Cancer Control Research, BC Cancer Agency, BC. david.mclean@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Skin cancer is common in North America. Incidence rate trends are potentially important in the assessment of the effects of measures to increase sun awareness in the population as well as measures to reduce sun damage.
To determine the incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) in a geographically defined Canadian population over a 40-year period.
Data were obtained from the BC Cancer Registry for the calendar years 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003.
Age-standardized incidence rates increased significantly from 1973 to 2003 for BCC, SCC, and CMM.
The ethnic makeup of British Columbia has changed over time, and a novel method of accounting for the effect of this on skin cancer rates is presented.
The incidence rate for skin cancers continued to rise in British Columbia, but there appears to have been a decline in the incidence of CMM and BCC in the youngest cohorts.
PubMed ID
22513059 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Contemp Longterm Care. 1990 Jun;13(6):31-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(2):161-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
E M Illing
L A Gaudette
J. McLaughlin
M. McBride
Author Affiliation
Health Status Section, Canadian Centre for Health Information, Statistics Canada.
Source
Health Rep. 1992;4(2):161-74
Date
1992
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Survival Rate
Abstract
In Canada, it is estimated that in 1992 115,000 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed. This total excludes 47,200 estimated new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer. The number of new cases is increasing by about 3,000 per year due partly to the aging population, improved registration, earlier detection of cancer and real increases in the incidence of some types of cancer. It is estimated that there will be 58,300 cancer deaths in 1992. By 1992, prostate cancer will have overtaken lung cancer as the leading cancer among men in the four western provinces while lung cancer is expected to exceed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer deaths among women in some provinces, notably British Columbia. In British Columbia, the relative survival rates for most cancers improved between the periods 1970 to 1974 and 1980 to 1984. However, stomach, lung and pancreatic cancers, which have low survival rates, showed little improvement. This article is based on 1992 estimates of cancer incidence and mortality, cancer trends in Canada and relative cancer survival rates in British Columbia, found in Canadian Cancer Statistics 1992. This publication was prepared at Statistics Canada through a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Cancer Society, Health and Welfare Canada and the provincial/territorial cancer registries.
PubMed ID
1421019 View in PubMed
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Source
Telemed Today. 1998 Apr-May;6(2):22-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Rosen
Author Affiliation
Impact Video Communication, San Francisco, CA, USA. erosen@impactvid.com
Source
Telemed Today. 1998 Apr-May;6(2):22-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Computer Communication Networks - instrumentation - trends
Dentistry
Home Care Services
Humans
Telemedicine - instrumentation - trends
Telephone - instrumentation - trends
Television - instrumentation
United States
PubMed ID
10181176 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Surviv News (Atlanta Ga). 2002 Feb;:12
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Feb-2002

5402 records – page 1 of 541.