Skip header and navigation

Refine By

22 records – page 1 of 3.

Source
Int J Psychosom. 1994;41(1-4):87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Zinchenko
Author Affiliation
Saybrook Institute, San Francisco, CA 94133.
Source
Int J Psychosom. 1994;41(1-4):87-92
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arousal
Behavior, Addictive - psychology - rehabilitation
Breathing Exercises
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Internal-External Control
Psychotherapy
Russia
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
PubMed ID
7843873 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breathing patterns during breathing exercises in persons with tetraplegia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18479
Source
Spinal Cord. 2003 May;41(5):290-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
P. Bodin
M. Kreuter
B. Bake
M Fagevik Olsén
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiotherapy, SU/Sahlgrenska, Göteborg S-413 45, Sweden.
Source
Spinal Cord. 2003 May;41(5):290-5
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breath Tests - methods
Breathing Exercises
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates
Humans
Lung Volume Measurements - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Plethysmography
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Pressure
Quadriplegia - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration
Rest - physiology
Time Factors
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional, observational, controlled study. OBJECTIVES: To survey breathing patterns during breathing at rest, ordinary deep breathing (DB), positive expiratory pressure (PEP) and inspiratory resistance-positive expiratory pressure (IR-PEP) among individuals with a cervical spinal cord lesion (SCL) compared with able-bodied controls. SETTING: Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. METHOD: Participants consisted of 20 persons with a complete SCL at the C5-C8 level (at least 1 year postinjury) and 20 matched, able-bodied controls. Breathing patterns and static lung volumes were measured using a body plethysmograph. RESULTS: Compared to the controls, breathing patterns at rest among the people with tetraplegia were characterised by a decreased tidal volume, stable respiratory rate and total cycle duration resulting in decreased mean inspiratory and expiratory flow, and alveolar ventilation. All volume and flow parameters increased except respiratory rate, which decreased during DB and PEP. During IR-PEP, tidal volume increased less compared to PEP, and combined with a decreased respiratory rate the alveolar ventilation was lower than during breathing at rest. The functional residual capacity increased during PEP and IR-PEP in people with tetraplegia. CONCLUSION: DB exercises with or without resistance during expiration or the whole breathing cycle affect the breathing pattern in persons with tetraplegia. DB was superior in increasing volumes and flow. PEP and IR-PEP increased FRC but IR-PEP decreased volumes and flows. However, large interindividual differences in the SCL group indicate the need for caution in generalising the results. SPONSORSHIP: This work was supported in part by grants from the Memorial Foundation of the Swedish Association of registered Physiotherapists and the Association of Cancer and Road Accident Victims.
PubMed ID
12714992 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chest physiotherapy and breathing exercises for cardiac surgery patients in Sweden--a national survey of practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131151
Source
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 2011 Jun;75(2):112-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
E. Westerdahl
M Fagevik Olsén
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. elisabeth.westerdahl@orebroll.se
Source
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 2011 Jun;75(2):112-9
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breathing Exercises
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Therapy Modalities
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Postoperative Complications - prevention & control
Postoperative Period
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Various chest physiotherapy techniques are recommended after cardiac surgery around the world. There is limited published data on what breathing exercises actually are recommended to patients after surgery in Europe. The aim of this national survey was to establish the current practice of chest physiotherapy and breathing exercises for adult patients following cardiac surgery in Sweden.
A postal questionnaire was sent to a total population sample of 33 Swedish physiotherapists working at the departments of cardiothoracic surgery in December 2007 and January 2008.
In total, 29 replies (88%) were received. Seven male and twenty two female physiotherapists completed the questionnaire. All physiotherapists instructed, on a regular basis, the cardiac surgery patients to perform post-operative breathing exercises. Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) breathing was routinely used as the first choice for treatment by 22 (83%) of the physiotherapists. Expiratory pressures used varied between 2 and 20 cm H2O. Recommended frequency and duration of the exercises varied from 4 to 30 breaths hourly during the daytime in the first post-operative days. All physiotherapists provided coughing support to the patients. Recommendations to continue breathing exercises after discharge varied from not at all up to 3 months after surgery.
Breathing exercises are regularly prescribed during the initial post-operative days after cardiac surgery in Sweden. Hourly deep breathing exercises performed with or without a PEP device were reported to be first choice treatments during the hospital stay. Instructions concerning how long patients should continue the exercises after discharge varied notably.
Notes
Comment In: Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 2011 Jun;75(2):109-1121932694
PubMed ID
21932695 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cold therapy for the management of pain associated with deep breathing and coughing post-cardiac surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143647
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010;20(2):18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Myrianne Chailler
Jacqueline Ellis
Anne Stolarik
Kirsten Woodend
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON. mchai104@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010;20(2):18-24
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Breathing Exercises - adverse effects
Clinical Nursing Research
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects
Cross-Over Studies
Cryotherapy - instrumentation - methods - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Postoperative Care - methods
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Coughing has been identified as the most painful experience post cardiac surgery.
Participants (n = 32), in a randomized crossover trial, applied a frozen gel pack to their sternal incision dressing before performing deep breathing and coughing (DB & C) exercises. Pain scores from 0 to 10 at rest were compared with pain scores post DB & C with and without the gel pack. Participants were also asked to describe their sensations with the frozen gel pack, as well as their preferences for gel pack application.
The repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant reduction in pain scores between pre- and post-application of the gel pack (F = 28.69, p
PubMed ID
20458988 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of inspiratory muscle training in patients with multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184325
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Jul;84(7):994-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Brita Klefbeck
Jallal Hamrah Nedjad
Author Affiliation
Neurotec Department, Division of Physiotherapy, Karoliniska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Jul;84(7):994-9
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breathing Exercises
Disability Evaluation
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Male
Maximal Expiratory Flow Rate
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Progressive - complications
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Physical Endurance
Questionnaires
Respiratory Insufficiency - etiology - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Respiratory Muscles - physiopathology
Severity of Illness Index
Spirometry
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Vital Capacity
Abstract
To evaluate whether inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves inspiratory muscle strength, respiratory capacity, fatigue, and subjective perception of physical endurance in patients with advanced multiple sclerosis (MS).
Randomized controlled trial.
Outpatient clinic in Sweden.
Fifteen severely disabled patients with MS, randomized to a training or control group.
Seven patients trained with a Threshold inspiratory muscle trainer, twice every other day, with 3 sets of 10 loaded inspirations (40%-60% of patients' maximal inspiratory pressure [Pimax]) over a 10-week period.
Spirometry, Pimax, maximal expiratory pressure (Pemax), clinical assessments, and questionnaires on the patients' fatigue severity and physical endurance were evaluated.
After training, the Pimax (P
PubMed ID
12881823 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Effect of special regulated respiratory exercises on autonomic support of functional state of the cardio-vascular system]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49582
Source
Lik Sprava. 2005 Jun;(4):39-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
L P Sydorchuk
M H Tryniak
Source
Lik Sprava. 2005 Jun;(4):39-42
Date
Jun-2005
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Breathing Exercises
Cardiovascular physiology
Cardiovascular System - innervation
English Abstract
Exercise Test
Female
Hemodynamic Processes - physiology
Humans
Male
Abstract
48 healthy people have been observed to determine the influence of individually chosen special regulated respiratory exercises on functional state of the cardio-vascular system. The findings showed that special regulated respiratory exercises considerably enhance vegetative supply to the cardio-vascular system thus increasing its functional state.
PubMed ID
16158713 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a home-based exercise program on the insulin-like growth factor axis in patients operated for colorectal cancer in Sweden: Results from the randomised controlled trial PHYSSURG-C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307088
Source
Growth Horm IGF Res. 2020 04; 51:27-33
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2020
Author
Aron Onerup
Sven-Egron Thörn
Eva Angenete
David Bock
Elin Grybäck Gillheimer
Eva Haglind
Hanna Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Scandinavian Surgical Outcomes Research Group (SSORG), Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: aron.onerup@gu.se.
Source
Growth Horm IGF Res. 2020 04; 51:27-33
Date
04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breathing Exercises - methods
Colorectal Neoplasms - metabolism - surgery
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Glycated Hemoglobin A - metabolism
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - metabolism
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care - methods
Preoperative Care
Preoperative Exercise
Sweden
Abstract
We report results from a subgroup within the ongoing PHYSSURG-C trial with the aim to examine effects of exercise on IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery.
Randomised controlled trial.
A Swedish university hospital.
Between 2015 and 2016, 217 patients were enrolled (I = 106, C = 111), with 122 patients that had given blood samples at baseline and at least at one follow-up (I = 51, C = 71). Patients 20 year or older with colorectal cancer were eligible. Exclusion criteria were emergency surgery, local surgery, language problems or inability to perform intervention.
Patients were computer-randomised to either a daily home-based aerobic exercise intervention (I), or to usual care (C). The intervention lasted two weeks before surgery and four weeks after discharge from hospital and consisted of medium-intensity aerobic exercise and inspiratory muscle training. Circulating concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were determined by blinded personnel at baseline, time of surgery and 4-6 weeks postoperatively.
The outcome of this subpopulation report was change in IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 concentrations from baseline to surgery, and 4-6 weeks postoperatively.
The IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio increased from baseline to surgery by 11% in I and 8% in C with no difference between groups (I vs. C: 1.04, 95%CI: 0.97-1.11; p = 1.000). Postoperative change was 5% in I and 3% in C with no difference between groups (I vs. C:1.03, 95%CI: 0.96-1.10; p = 1.000). Results concerning IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 also showed statistically significant dynamics over time with no difference between groups. No adverse events were reported.
The home-based exercise program in our trial did not have any effect on IGF-1, or IGFBP-3.
The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov with identifier NCT02299596. This work was funded externally.
Notes
ErratumIn: Growth Horm IGF Res. 2020 Dec 8;:101374 PMID 33308998
PubMed ID
32007834 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Forced exhaust spirography in healthy and sick children in active phase of rheumatism]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44381
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1969 Jan-Feb;1:20-2
Publication Type
Article

Glossopharyngeal pistoning for lung insufflation in patients with cervical spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91304
Source
Spinal Cord. 2009 May;47(5):418-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Nygren-Bonnier M.
Wahman K.
Lindholm P.
Markström A.
Westgren N.
Klefbeck B.
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. malin.nygren-bonnier@karolinska.se
Source
Spinal Cord. 2009 May;47(5):418-22
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breathing Exercises
Cervical Vertebrae - injuries
Expiratory Reserve Volume
Female
Functional Residual Capacity
Humans
Inspiratory Capacity
Insufflation
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Residual Volume
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Mechanics
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Sweden
Time Factors
Total lung capacity
Vital Capacity
Young Adult
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVES:To evaluate whether patients with cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) are able to learn the technique of glossopharyngeal pistoning (breathing) for lung insufflation (GI) and if learned, to evaluate the effects of GI on pulmonary function and chest expansion after 8 weeks. SETTING: Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with CSCI (21 men, four women) with a mean age of 46 years (21-70), from the Stockholm area, were used in this study. The participants performed 10 cycles of GI four times a week, for 8 weeks. Pulmonary function tests made before and after the GI training included vital capacity (VC), expiratory reserve volume (ERV), functional residual capacity (FRC; measured with nitrogen washout), residual volume (RV) and total lung capacity (TLC). Chest expansion was measured before and after training. RESULTS: Five of the twenty-five participants had difficulty in performing GI and were excluded in further analysis. Performing a GI maneuvre increased participants' VC on average by 0.88+/-0.5 l. After 8 weeks of training, the participants had significantly increased their VC 0.23 l, (P
PubMed ID
19002147 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Healthy lifestyle formation and lower dependence on atmosphere oxygen in working].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271931
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2016;(1):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
S L Usti'yantsev
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2016;(1):29-32
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apnea - metabolism
Atmosphere
Breathing Exercises
Entropy
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metallurgy
Occupational Health
Oxygen - metabolism
Russia
Abstract
Studies covered 38 males in laboratory and 81 males in industrial conditions of 13 metallurgic enterprises and revealed some reliable phenomena caused by dry voluntary apnea of 10-60 seconds. At muscular rest and during physical exertion, evidences are that voluntary apnea forms transitory hypercapnic portion of blood in pulmonary arterial flow. First finding is that this portion in other blood behaves as an anabolic wave carrying increased concentration of low-molecular CO2 material and releasing additional (wave, according to authors) O2 from its depot in the body. This oxygen, in conditions of increased blood pressure due to apnea, is used for synthesis of additional ATP. These phenomena characterize formation and development a new beneficial physiologic system in workers--a functional system of motivation to healthy lifestyle.
PubMed ID
27048140 View in PubMed
Less detail

22 records – page 1 of 3.