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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Sep 10;116(21):2607
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1996
Author
B. Mørland
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Sep 10;116(21):2607
Date
Sep-10-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
Female
Humans
Norway
Practice Guidelines
Research
PubMed ID
8928134 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antiestrogen treatment of postmenopausal women with primary high risk breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26992
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1983;3(1):77-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
C. Rose
S M Thorpe
H T Mouridsen
J A Andersen
H. Brincker
K W Andersen
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1983;3(1):77-84
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
Clinical Trials
Denmark
Estrogen Antagonists - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Mastectomy
Menopause
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Random Allocation
Receptors, Estrogen - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Tamoxifen - therapeutic use
Abstract
The role of antiestrogen treatment in high risk postmenopausal patients with primary breast cancer is currently evaluated in a nationwide, prospective randomized trial conducted by the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. The primary treatment is total mastectomy and radiotherapy. As of February 1, 1982, 720 women were randomized to treatment with tamoxifen (30 mg daily for 1 year) and 691 women were randomized to no further therapy. Life-table analysis after 36 months shows a difference in recurrence rates of 9% (p = 0.19) in favor of the tamoxifen-treated patients. The material has been analyzed with respect to established prognostic factors such as age, degree of anaplasia, tumor size, and number of positive nodes. The rates of recurrent disease are lower in all subsets of patients treated with tamoxifen, but are only statistically significant in patients 50-59 years of age or with 4 or more positive lymph nodes. Regardless of treatment, ER negative patients have a 23% higher recurrence rate than ER positive patients after 18 months of analysis (p = 0.0033); this represents an approximate doubling of risk, and is independent of age, degree of anaplasia, tumor size, or lymph node status. With regard to PgR status, there is 11% higher recurrence rate in the PgR negative than in the PgR positive patients (p = 0.097).
PubMed ID
6347277 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Application of the EUSOMA criteria in breast units in countries of the European Union]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16522
Source
Cir Esp. 2005 Feb;77(2):65-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Belén Merck
Pilar Cansado
Ana Fernández-Frías
Alvaro Rodríguez-Lescure
David Costa
Francisco J Lacueva
Fernando Candela
Rafael Calpena
Author Affiliation
Servicio de Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario de Elche, Elche, Alicante. belenmerck@yahoo.es
Source
Cir Esp. 2005 Feb;77(2):65-9
Date
Feb-2005
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
English Abstract
European Union
Hospital Units - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Patient care team
Abstract
All the countries of the European Union face similar challenges when providing adequate and high quality treatment in oncology. A working party was established to consider what should comprise a specialist service and the Requirements of a Breast Unit, published in 2000, represent the opinion of the European Society of Mastology (EUSOMA) on the standards required for creating high quality Breast Cancer Units across Europe. We studied the application of the mandatory requisites and general recommendations of EUSOMA: critical mass, or minimum number of patients, core team (composition and specific training), quality assurance, and application of diagnostic and treatment protocols. A thorough literature search was performed and was completed with information from search tools, the web pages of scientific societies, national associations for the fight against cancer, and health ministries of the countries belonging to the European Union. We also analyzed the latest reports of the European Parliamentary Committee for breast cancer. Distinct approaches to the multidisciplinary management of breast disease can be found in the United Kingdom, Sweden, Italy, France and Spain. A common European standard would be useful to improve the care provided to patients.
PubMed ID
16420889 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the health and functional status of older women with breast cancer using the Minimum Data Set-Home Care (MDS-HC).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191893
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Nov-Dec;92(6):457-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
P C Fletcher
J P Hirdes
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology & Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5. pfletche@wlu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Nov-Dec;92(6):457-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Female
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
PubMed ID
11799553 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between population-based treatment guidelines and adjuvant therapy for node-negative breast cancer. British Columbia/Ontario Working Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210113
Source
Br J Cancer. 1997;75(10):1534-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
C. Sawka
I. Olivotto
A. Coldman
V. Goel
E. Holowaty
T G Hislop
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1997;75(10):1534-42
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
British Columbia
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Cohort Studies
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Humans
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Middle Aged
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Tamoxifen - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
This study evaluated the impact of province-wide treatment guidelines on consistency of adjuvant therapy for node-negative breast cancer. A retrospective population-based cohort study was conducted in the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, which has province-wide guidelines, and Ontario, which does not. All eligible 1991 incident cases of node-negative breast cancer in British Columbia (n = 942) and a similar number of randomly selected 1991 incident cases in Ontario (n = 938) were reviewed. Consistency of adjuvant therapy received was evaluated by stratifying cases into discrete diagnostic groups using several grouping systems, and by then comparing the distribution of treatments received within each diagnostic group in the two provinces. Recursive partitioning was also performed. We observed that patterns of pathology reporting were consistent with awareness of the factors used in the British Columbia guidelines to define indications for adjuvant therapy. Consistency of care was greater in British Columbia than in Ontario by all diagnostic grouping systems and by recursive partitioning (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
9166950 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atlantic Breast Cancer Information Project: formation of a "town-gown" partnership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204372
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1998 Feb;2(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
G M Johnston
D. Murnaghan
S K Buehler
L S Nugent
Author Affiliation
School of Health Services Administration, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. grace.johnston@dal.ca
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1998 Feb;2(1):23-9
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
Canada
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Abstract
The Atlantic Breast Cancer Information Project (ABCIP) is one of 5 breast cancer information exchange projects funded by Health Canada. This article describes the development of ABCIP and thereby contributes to the limited knowledge on successful partnership formation in the face of restraints but with support from enabling factors. Partnership formation is presented in the context of alliances in management, coalitions in health promotion, and social movements. The restraining factors were the inertia of the status quo, provincial structures and concerns about empowering others. The enabling factors fell into 3 categories: timely logistics, roles of individuals who participated at critical points in the process, and the evolution of a supportive cultural environment. The article outlines ABCIP's achievements to date.
PubMed ID
9765763 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Breast cancer. Methods in intensely criticized research project]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25782
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1988 Sep 21;88(38):9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-21-1988
Author
A. Vesterdal
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1988 Sep 21;88(38):9
Date
Sep-21-1988
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
Clinical Trials - methods - standards
Denmark
Female
Humans
Research Design - standards
PubMed ID
3217862 View in PubMed
Less detail

The breast cancer research scandal: addressing the issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215351
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Apr 15;152(8):1195-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1995
Author
C. Weijer
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Apr 15;152(8):1195-7
Date
Apr-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
Ethics, Medical
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Morals
Patient Selection
Quebec
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - methods - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Scientific Misconduct
United States
Abstract
The three claims put forward by Dr. Roger Poisson to rationalize his enrollment of ineligible subjects in clinical trials do not justify research fraud. None the less, certain lessons for the conduct of clinical research can be learned from the affair: experimental therapies should be made available to technically ineligible subjects when no effective therapy exists for their disease; further research must investigate the possible benefits of clinical-trial participation; broadly based, pragmatic trials must be regarded as the ideal model; and each eligibility criterion in a clinical-trial protocol should be justified.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7736369 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bridging the gap: decision-making processes of women with breast cancer using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162670
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2007 Aug;15(8):973-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Lynda G Balneaves
Tracy L O Truant
Mary Kelly
Marja J Verhoef
B Joyce Davison
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, 302-6190 Agronomy Road, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. lynda.balneaves@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2007 Aug;15(8):973-83
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - therapy
British Columbia
Complementary Therapies
Conflict (Psychology)
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore the personal and social processes women with breast cancer engaged in when making decisions about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The overall aim was to develop a conceptual model of the treatment decision-making process specific to breast cancer care and CAM that will inform future information and decision support strategies.
Grounded theory methodology explored the decisions of women with breast cancer using CAM. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 20 women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Following open, axial, and selective coding, the constant comparative method was used to identify key themes in the data and develop a conceptual model of the CAM decision-making process.
The final decision-making model, Bridging the Gap, was comprised of four core concepts including maximizing choices/minimizing risks, experiencing conflict, gathering and filtering information, and bridging the gap. Women with breast cancer used one of three decision-making styles to address the paradigmatic, informational, and role conflict they experienced as a result of the gap they perceived between conventional care and CAM: (1) taking it one step at a time, (2) playing it safe, and (3) bringing it all together.
Women with breast cancer face conflict and anxiety when making decisions about CAM within a conventional cancer care context. Information and decision support strategies are needed to ensure women are making safe, informed treatment decisions about CAM. The model, Bridging the Gap, provides a conceptual framework for future decision support interventions.
PubMed ID
17609997 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian breast cancer research initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214348
Source
Can J Oncol. 1995 Sep;5(3):VII-X
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995

82 records – page 1 of 9.