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[Acceptance of mammographic screening by immigrant women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19313
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Jan 7;164(2):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-7-2002
Author
Ida Kristine Holk
Nils Rosdahl
Karen L Damgaard Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Embedslaegeinstitutionen for Københavns, Frederiksberg Kommuner, Henrik Pontoppidansvej 8, DK-2200 København N.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Jan 7;164(2):195-200
Date
Jan-7-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology - radiography
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Mammography - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pakistan - ethnology
Patient compliance
Poland - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate compliance by ethnic groups to the mammography screening programme in the City of Copenhagen over six years and to look at developments over time. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mammography screening has, since 1 April 1991, been offered free of charge to all women between 50 and 69 years of age in the City of Copenhagen. Data on women born in Poland, Turkey, Yugoslavia, and Pakistan divided into five-year groups were compared to that of women born in Denmark and all other foreign-born women. Data from 1991 to 1997 were grouped according to the mammography performed, the offer refused, or non-appearance. RESULTS: Whereas 71% of Danish-born women accepted mammography, compliance by foreign-born women was significantly lower. The offer was accepted by 36% of Pakistanis, 45% of Yugoslavians, 53% of Turks, and 64% of Poles. Compliance fell in all ethnic groups with advancing age. Of the Danish women, 16% failed to keep the appointment. The corresponding percentages were 52 for Pakistanis, 48 for Yugoslavians, 41 for Turks, and 23 for Poles. The proportion of women who actively refused the offer was similar in all groups. The number of invited women fell during the period. CONCLUSIONS: The lower participation of women from the countries under study might have various explanations: among them the language barrier, procedure-related factors, and a lower incidence of breast cancer in the countries of origin.
PubMed ID
11831089 View in PubMed
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Access to medical care: how do women in Canada and the United States compare?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115809
Source
Prev Med. 2013 May;56(5):345-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Karen Buhr
Author Affiliation
Penn State Harrisburg, School of Public Affairs, Middletown, PA 17057, USA. kjb44@psu.edu
Source
Prev Med. 2013 May;56(5):345-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Canada
Early Detection of Cancer - utilization
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance Coverage - statistics & numerical data
Mammography - utilization
Medically Uninsured - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
United States
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to determine if access to medical care and utilization of cancer screenings differs between women in the United States and Canada. This study examined this question by comparing women in Canada to women in the United States who have insurance coverage and those who do not.
This study used data from the 2002/03 Joint Canada United States Survey of Health and examined access to medical care and cancer screenings. A binary probit model was used to address several measures of access to medical care and cancer screening utilization.
This study finds five significant differences between insured American and Canadian women. Canadian women are better off in terms of ever having a mammogram, having a regular doctor, and having access to needed medicine, but fare worse in terms of having had a recent mammogram and having perceived unmet healthcare needs. With the exception of having recent mammograms, there is no statistical difference between uninsured and insured American women.
Although this study does not show that one group is strictly better off, it does show that there are significant differences between the two groups of women.
PubMed ID
23462478 View in PubMed
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[Active screening for cancer patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229298
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1990 Apr;68(4):106-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
Iu Ia Gritsman
G A Frank
E F Stranadko
M A Khadzhiev
I N Batinov
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1990 Apr;68(4):106-10
Date
Apr-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - prevention & control
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Abstract
Basic conventional methods of secondary cancer prevention are clinically reviewed. The authors hold that further extensive development of present-day organisational patterns (wider screening coverage of population, growing number of objective diagnostic techniques) shows no promise in inducing positive trends of cancer outcome statistics. Scientifically validated diminution of precancer definition is stated. Selection of population at risk for cancer and proper examination of these risk groups seem most perspective in improvement of cancer statistics.
PubMed ID
2370767 View in PubMed
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Adherence and discontinuation of adjuvant hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127527
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2012 May;133(1):367-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Annette Wigertz
Johan Ahlgren
Marit Holmqvist
Tommy Fornander
Jan Adolfsson
Henrik Lindman
Leif Bergkvist
Mats Lambe
Author Affiliation
Regional Cancer Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. Annette.Wigertz@akademiska.se
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2012 May;133(1):367-73
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - therapeutic use
Aromatase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Maintenance Chemotherapy
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - prevention & control
Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent - prevention & control
Sweden
Tamoxifen - therapeutic use
Abstract
Adherence to long-term pharmacological treatment for chronic conditions is often less than optimal. Till date, a limited number of population-based studies have assessed adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy in breast cancer, a therapy with proven benefits in terms of reductions of recurrence and mortality. We aimed to examine rates of adherence and early discontinuation in Sweden where prescribed medications are subsidized for all residents and made available at reduced out-of-pocket costs. Individual-level data were obtained from Regional Clinical Quality Breast Cancer Registers, the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, and several other population-based registers. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze factors associated with adherence to prescribed medication for a period of 3 years. Between January 1 and December 31, 2005, 1,741 patients in central Sweden were identified with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, and at least one prescription dispensation of either tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor. Of these women, 1,193 (69%) were fully adherent to therapy for 3 years (medication possession ratio of 80% or higher and a maximum of 180 days between refills). During the 3-year follow-up, 215 women (12%) had prematurely discontinued therapy. Adherence was positively associated with younger age, large tumor size, being married, and being born in the Nordic countries, while no clear association was observed with education or income. During the 3 years of follow-up, 31% of women were non-adherent to therapy. Further efforts must be undertaken to promote adherence over the entire recommended treatment period.
PubMed ID
22286315 View in PubMed
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Adult cancer prevention in primary care: patterns of practice in Qu├ębec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241586
Source
Am J Public Health. 1983 Sep;73(9):1036-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1983
Author
R N Battista
Source
Am J Public Health. 1983 Sep;73(9):1036-9
Date
Sep-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Colonic Neoplasms - prevention & control
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - prevention & control
Mammography
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Occult Blood
Patient Education as Topic
Quebec
Rectal Neoplasms - prevention & control
Smoking - prevention & control
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
We conducted a survey of a representative sample of all primary care physicians in the province of Québec to ascertain their patterns of preventive practice with respect to cancer in four anatomical sites: breast, colon-rectum, cervix, and lung. A stratified random sample of 430 physicians in general practice was interviewed individually and weighted population estimates derived. Physicians report teaching breast self-examination to their patients (96 per cent), performing breast examination (99 per cent), taking pap tests routinely (91 per cent), and pursuing anti-smoking counseling (98 per cent). Very few of them report submitting their patients over 50 years of age to annual mammography (8 per cent) or checking for occult blood in stools in patients over 45 years of age (15 per cent). Many still use routine chest X-rays as an early detection measure of cancer of the lung (77 per cent); an estimated 41 per cent use sputum cytology for the same purpose. Preventive practices, when in-use, are carried out mainly in the context of major encounters with patients such as general check-ups. Less than 28 per cent of the population is estimated to be reached by this strategy for prevention. The unrealized potential for prevention through capitalizing on all encounters with primary care physicians is important, and should stimulate creative efforts to enhance preventive activities in medical practice.
Notes
Cites: Med Care. 1982 Oct;20(10):1040-57132464
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1978 Mar 9;298(10):567-8625313
Cites: Lancet. 1976 Jun 5;1(7971):1228-3158269
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1977 Mar 17;296(11):601-8402571
PubMed ID
6881398 View in PubMed
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Advocacy groups for breast cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215572
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):829-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1995
Author
M. Waller
S. Batt
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology and Sociology, John Abbott College, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Que.
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):829-33
Date
Mar-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology
Canada
Decision Making
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Patient Advocacy - trends
Research Support as Topic
Self-Help Groups
Abstract
Breast cancer patient advocacy groups emerged in the 1990s to support and empower women with breast cancer. Women with cancer and oncologists tend to have divergent perspectives on how breast cancer prevention should be defined and what the priorities for research should be. As their American counterparts have done, breast cancer patient advocates in Canada are seeking greater participation in decision making with respect to research. To date they have had more input into research policy decisions than into the planning of specific projects. In 1993 the National Forum on Breast Cancer recommended that women with breast cancer should have more input into the research process; breast cancer patient advocates will continue to actively pursue this objective.
Notes
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1990 Summer;6(2):33-452376805
Cites: Lancet. 1992 Nov 7;340(8828):1143-51359220
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1994;(16):139-477999456
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1992 Winter;8(4):30-71487790
Cites: Med J Aust. 1992 Oct 19;157(8):553-51479978
PubMed ID
7697576 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of the breast self-exam (BSE) practices of Asian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191030
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2001;11(2):82-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H Y Akrigg
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre, in Vancouver, B.C.
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2001;11(2):82-3
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asia - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Breast Self-Examination
Canada
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
PubMed ID
11894488 View in PubMed
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An introduction to the framework project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207737
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Aug;1(3):192-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
J E Till
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Statistics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto. till@oci.utoronto.ca
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Aug;1(3):192-5
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Canada
Consumer Participation
Decision Making
Efficiency, Organizational
Ethics
Female
Health planning
Health Priorities
Humans
Intervention Studies
Mass Screening
Neoplasms - prevention & control - therapy
Palliative Care
Population Surveillance
Program Development
Research
Smoking - prevention & control
Social Responsibility
Abstract
The framework project of the Advisory Committee on Cancer Control (ACOCC), National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC), was based on the NCIC/ACOCC conceptual framework for bridging the gap between research and action. The project was carried out under the auspices of the Sociobehavioural Cancer Research Network (SCRN) of the NCIC. It focused on 3 research areas of cancer control research: smoking control, palliative care and screening for breast cancer. In this introductory paper, the criteria and methodology used for the framework project are described, the main features of the framework are outlined and the definitions of terms used in the framework are summarized. It was expected that the framework project would lead to a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the NCIC/ACOCC conceptual framework. The project was also expected to assist the SCRN in its ongoing efforts to develop and refine an action-oriented research agenda.
PubMed ID
9765744 View in PubMed
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Applying the 2011 Canadian guidelines for breast cancer screening in practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120824
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Nov 6;184(16):1803-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-6-2012
Author
Ellen Warner
Ruth Heisey
June C Carroll
Author Affiliation
Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Canada. ellen.warner@sunnybrook.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Nov 6;184(16):1803-7
Date
Nov-6-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Canada
Early Detection of Cancer - standards
Female
Humans
Mammography - standards
Mass Screening - standards
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2012 Sep 4;184(12):139122291177
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Nov 22;183(17):1991-200122106103
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Jun 26;164(13):1837-4611450279
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2002 Jul;38(11):1458-6412110490
Cites: J Med Genet. 2003 Nov;40(11):807-1414627668
Cites: Clin Breast Cancer. 2005 Oct;6(4):330-316277883
Cites: Am Fam Physician. 2006 Nov 15;74(10):1759-6017137007
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Dec 6;98(23):1686-9317148770
Cites: CA Cancer J Clin. 2007 Mar-Apr;57(2):75-8917392385
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2007 Apr 3;146(7):516-2617404354
Cites: J Am Coll Radiol. 2007 May;4(5):285-817467609
Cites: Nat Clin Pract Oncol. 2008 Dec;5(12):700-418825141
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2009 Nov 17;151(10):727-37, W237-4219920273
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2009 Nov 17;151(10):738-4719920274
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Aug;118(2 Pt 1):372-8221775869
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):469-7611233866
PubMed ID
22966059 View in PubMed
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[A program to instruct women in breast self-examination].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103584
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1990;36(9):1095-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
E A Mikhailov
V N Sagaidak
E A Golubeva
L V Remennik
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1990;36(9):1095-9
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Moscow
Patient Education as Topic - methods - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Self-Examination - methods
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
World Health Organization
Abstract
The study was concerned with analysis of the second stage of evaluation of a breast self-examination training program aimed at early detection of cancer. A total of 60,079 of women were recruited into the WHO/USSR Project in Moscow in 1985-1988: study group--30,465 and controls--29,614. At 6 months, 52.5% of women performed breast self-examination on a regular basis whereas at 12 months the percentage decreased to 42.0. Breast cancer was diagnosed in 6 out of 11,548 females of the study group (stage I--1 case, stage II--3 and stage III--2 cases) and in 10 out of 23,083 controls (stage I--2, stage II--5, stage III--2 and stage IV--1 patient). In the study group, medical advice was sought 4.5 times more frequently than in controls.
PubMed ID
2238551 View in PubMed
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227 records – page 1 of 23.