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[Breast cancer surgery in Norway 1990-95 illustrated by data from SINTEF United]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19462
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Sep 30;121(23):2688-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-2001
Author
S. Lundgren
S. Jørgensen
R. KÃ¥resen
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Unimed NIS 7465 Trondheim. steinar.lundgren@unimed.sintef.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Sep 30;121(23):2688-93
Date
Sep-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Mastectomy, Segmental - methods - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Breast-conserving therapy has been shown to be as effective as mastectomy in many cases; hence in many countries more breast cancer patients are offered this type of treatment. This study focuses on the amount and type of surgery used in Norway for breast cancer patients and the possible use of hospital discharge data to evaluate the diffusion of this surgical practice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data from the nationwide Register of Hospital Discharges in Norway at SINTEF Unimed for patients operated for breast cancer from 1990 to 1995 were used. RESULTS: 11,041 patients were registered with 11,727 hospital admissions for breast cancer operations from a total of 64 hospitals. The discrepancy in the number of breast cancer patients with the National Cancer Registry was 7%. Breast-conserving surgery was performed in 19.7%. An increase from 17% in 1990 to 21% in 1995 was found, but with variations according to type of hospital, county and age of patients. INTERPRETATION: The percentage of breast conserving surgery is still low in Norway; this indicates that many women are not offered this type of surgery. With some caution, the data from SINTEF Unimed can be used to reflect the clinical practice over time at Norwegian hospitals. Further improvements could be obtained if national identity numbers were added to the database.
PubMed ID
11699375 View in PubMed
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Delayed breast reconstruction with implants after invasive breast cancer does not impair prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85622
Source
Ann Plast Surg. 2008 Jul;61(1):11-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Hölmich Lisbet Rosenkrantz
Düring Maria
Henriksen Trine Foged
Krag Christen
Tange Ulla Brix
Kjøller Kim
McLaughlin Joseph K
Olsen Jørgen H
Friis Søren
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden, Copenhagen, Denmark. liroho02@herlevhosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Ann Plast Surg. 2008 Jul;61(1):11-8
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Implants - utilization
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Denmark
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Humans
Mammaplasty - utilization
Mastectomy
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prognosis
Registries
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Abstract
We investigated if delayed breast implant reconstruction after breast cancer impairs prognosis. Using data from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group register, we identified all women
PubMed ID
18580143 View in PubMed
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Influence of hospital characteristics on operative death and survival of patients after major cancer surgery in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167652
Source
Can J Surg. 2006 Aug;49(4):251-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Marko Simunovic
Eddy Rempel
Marc-Erick Thériault
Angela Coates
Timothy Whelan
Eric Holowaty
Bernard Langer
Mark Levine
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, the Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, ON. marko.simunovic@hrcc.on.ca
Source
Can J Surg. 2006 Aug;49(4):251-8
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Colonic Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Esophageal Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Teaching - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Surgical Procedures, Operative - mortality
Survival Analysis
Abstract
There is a lack of information from Canadian hospitals on the role of hospital characteristics such as procedure volume and teaching status on the survival of patients who undergo major cancer resection. Therefore, we chose to study these relationships using data from patients treated in Ontario hospitals.
We used the Ontario Cancer Registry from calendar years 1990-2000 to obtain data on patients who underwent surgery for breast, colon, lung or esophageal cancer or who underwent major liver surgery related to a cancer diagnosis between 1990 and 1995 in order to assess the influence of volume of procedures and teaching status of hospitals on in-hospital death rate and long-term survival. For each disease site and before observing patient outcomes data, volume cut-off points were selected to create volume groups with similar numbers of patients. Teaching hospitals were those directly affiliated with a medical school. Logistic regression and proportional hazards models were used to consider the clustering of data at the hospital level and to assess operative death and long-term survival. We also used 4 measures to gauge the degree of procedure regionalization across the province including (1) the number of hospitals performing a procedure; (2) the percentage of patients treated in teaching hospitals; (3) the percentage of rural patients treated in higher volume procedure hospitals; and (4) median distances travelled by patients to receive care.
The number of patients in our cohorts who underwent resection of the breast, colon, lung, esophagus or liver was 14 346, 8398, 2698, 629 and 362, respectively. Surgery in a high-volume versus a low-volume hospital did not have a statistically significant influence on the odds of operative death for patients who underwent colon, liver, lung or esophageal cancer resection. The risk of long-term death was increased in low-volume versus high-volume hospitals for patients who underwent resection of the breast (hazard ratio [HR] 1.2, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.0-1.4, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
16948883 View in PubMed
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[Prognosis after surgical treatment of breast cancer. 3. The low-risk group of the DBCG (Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24767
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Aug 12;153(33):2276-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-12-1991
Author
C K Axelsson
J A Andersen
K W Andersen
M. Blichert-Toft
P. Dombernowsky
M. Hansen
C. Krag
H T Mouridsen
M. Overgaard
B B Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Finseninstitutet, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Aug 12;153(33):2276-9
Date
Aug-12-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - mortality
Prognosis
Risk factors
Abstract
The two therapeutic protocols of The Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) DBCG 77a (1977-1982) and 82a (1982-1990) comprise patients who were classified as low risk patients after operation for cancer of the breast, a total of 7,315 women. Treatment consisted of mastectomy and dissection of the lower and middle axillary levels. The median period of observation for DBCG 77a was 9 1/2 years and for DBCG 82a 3 1/3 years. The curves for recurrence-free survival and survival were found to be congruent in the two protocols. The recurrence-free survival after five years was 70% and 55% after ten years. Survival was 87% after five years and 70% after ten years. Local recurrence developed in 12.7% and 1.1% had distant recurrences simultaneously. Local recurrence was distributed with 60% in the scar or thoracic wall, 33% in the axilla and 7% in the clavicular lymph nodes. Distant recurrence alone developed in 11.4%. The time curves for development of local or distant recurrences were practically congruent. Local recurrence developed in 3.8% of the patients per annum during the first four years and after that in 1.5% per annum. Distant recurrence was found in 3.5% per annum in the first four years and after that in 1.8% per annum. The survival was significantly different after local and distant recurrence. Patients with tumours of grade 1 anaplasia had better prognoses than patient with grade 2 og 3 tumours as regards recurrence-free survival and survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that age under 40 years and anaplasia grad were significant prognostic variables for the parameters: distant recurrence and local recurrence. In addition, the number of lymph nodes in the operation specimen was a prognostic variable for local recurrence.
PubMed ID
1781046 View in PubMed
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Radical mastectomy with parasternal and supraclavicular dissection for mammary carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28534
Source
Ann Surg. 1969 Dec;170(6):889-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1969

Risk for second primary non-breast cancer in pre- and postmenopausal women with breast cancer not treated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or endocrine therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136843
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2011 Apr;47(6):946-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Rikke Langballe
Jørgen H Olsen
Michael Andersson
Lene Mellemkjær
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. riklan@cancer.dk
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2011 Apr;47(6):946-52
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - mortality - surgery
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - etiology - mortality
Postmenopause
Postoperative Complications - etiology - mortality
Risk factors
Abstract
We investigated the risk for a second primary cancer in pre- and postmenopausal women with breast cancer treated by surgery alone, to assess the importance of non-treatment factors and menopausal status.
The cohort comprised 14,151 women with breast cancer diagnosed during 1977-2006, who did not receive radiotherapy or systemic adjuvant therapy. They were identified in the nationwide clinical database of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. The women were followed for a second primary cancer other than breast cancer in the Danish Cancer Registry, and risk was quantified as standardised incidence ratios (SIRs).
Women with breast cancer diagnosed before menopause had an 18% greater overall risk for a second primary non-breast cancer than the general female population (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.32). The excess was confined to cancers of the endometrium (1.5; 95% CI, 1.0-2.0) and ovaries (1.8; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4). Rare histological subtypes of breast cancer were associated with these two cancer sites. Women with breast cancer after menopause had no overall excess risk for a second cancer (SIR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.92-1.04).
An excess risk for second non-breast cancers related to non-treatment factors is seen primarily in breast cancer patients who were premenopausal at diagnosis.
PubMed ID
21339063 View in PubMed
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[Surgical treatment of breast neoplasms in early stages]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18662
Source
Klin Khir. 2002 Nov-Dec;(11-12):104-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ie V Cheshuk
V M Drozdov
A M Neiman
O S Zotov
L M Zakhartseva
M F Anikus'ko
V V Zaichuk
O I Sydorchuk
Source
Klin Khir. 2002 Nov-Dec;(11-12):104-7
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Mastectomy - methods
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Survival Rate
Abstract
Analysis of literary data and own investigation results for the modern surgical methods of treatment of mammary gland cancer in early stages was performed. Indexes of patients survival after surgical removal of mammary gland (MG) and quadranthectomy did not differ. Preservation of MG constitutes great social and psycho-emotional significance for women-patients.
PubMed ID
12549319 View in PubMed
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Survival of women with breast cancer in relation to smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20111
Source
Eur J Surg. 2000 Nov;166(11):852-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
J. Manjer
I. Andersson
G. Berglund
L. Bondesson
J P Garne
L. Janzon
J. Malina
S. Matson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Surg. 2000 Nov;166(11):852-8
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - surgery
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Carcinoma in Situ - mortality - surgery
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - mortality - surgery
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating - mortality - surgery
Carcinoma, Lobular - mortality - surgery
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Odds Ratio
Ovariectomy
Parity
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Smoking - adverse effects
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare survival of patients with breast cancer who had never smoked, were smokers, and who were ex-smokers. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: City of Malmö, Sweden. PATIENTS: 792 patients with breast cancer diagnosed between 1977-1986 in the Malmö mammographic screening trial. INTERVENTIONS: Follow-up of breast cancer cases through record-linkage with the Swedish Cause of Death Registry. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Death from breast cancer. Relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) of death from breast cancer was calculated for different smoking groups using Cox's proportional hazards analysis. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12.1 years, 145 patients died of breast cancer. Breast cancer mortality was 1347/10(5) person-years in those who had never smoked, 1941/10(5) in smokers, and 1493/10(5) in ex-smokers. The crude RR for smokers and ex-smokers, compared with those who had never smoked were 1.44 (1.01 to 2.06) and 1.13 (0.66 to 1.94), respectively. The RR associated with smoking remained significant after adjustment for age and stage at diagnosis, 2.14 (1.47 to 3.10), and other potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Survival after breast cancer was, as expected, strongly related to stage at diagnosis. However, stage by stage there was considerable variation between individual patients. We conclude that differences with regard to exposure to smoking contribute to this heterogeneity.
PubMed ID
11097150 View in PubMed
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Treatment and Prognosis of Radiation-Associated Breast Angiosarcoma in a Nationwide Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307971
Source
Ann Surg Oncol. 2020 Apr; 27(4):1002-1010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2020
Author
Samuli H Salminen
Tom Wiklund
Mika M Sampo
Maija Tarkkanen
Lea Pulliainen
Tom O Böhling
Erkki Tukiainen
Katja Hukkinen
Carl P Blomqvist
Author Affiliation
Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. samuli.h.salminen@helsinki.fi.
Source
Ann Surg Oncol. 2020 Apr; 27(4):1002-1010
Date
Apr-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Combined Modality Therapy
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemangiosarcoma - mortality - surgery
Humans
Mastectomy
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - mortality - surgery
Prognosis
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Registries
Survival Rate
Abstract
Radiation-associated angiosarcoma of the breast (RAASB) is an aggressive malignancy that is increasing in incidence. Only a few previous population-based studies have reported the results of RAASB treatment.
A search for RAASB patients was carried out in the Finnish Cancer Registry, and treatment data were collected to identify prognostic factors for survival.
Overall, 50 RAASB patients were identified. The median follow-up time was 5.4 years (range 0.4-15.6), and the 5-year overall survival rate was 69%. Forty-seven (94%) patients were operated on with curative intent. Among these patients, the 5-year local recurrence-free survival, distant recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 62%, 75%, and 74%, respectively. A larger planned surgical margin was associated with improved survival.
We found that the majority of RAASB patients were eligible for radical surgical management in this population-based analysis. With radical surgery, the prognosis is relatively good.
PubMed ID
31773514 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.